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Further east the Third Army was forced back to the west of Verdun as German attacks were made on the Meuse Heights to the south-east but managed to maintain contact with Verdun and the Fourth Army to the west. German attacks against the Second Army south of Verdun from 5 September almost forced the French to retreat but on 8 September the crisis eased. By 10 September the German armies west of Verdun were retreating towards the Aisne and the Franco-British were following up, collecting stragglers and equipment. On 12 September Joffre ordered an outflanking move to the west and an attack northwards by the Third Army to cut off the German retreat. The pursuit was too slow and on 14 September the German armes had dug in north of the Aisne and the Allies met trench lines rather than rearguards. Frontal attacks by the Ninth, Fifth and Sixth armies were repulsed on 15–16 September, which led Joffre to begin the transfer of the Second Army west to the left flank of the Sixth Army, the first phase of the Race to the Sea, a series of operations to outflank the German armies, which from 17 September to 17–19 October moved the opposing armies through Picardy and Flanders to the North Sea coast.

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以下のとおりお答えします。 連合国軍が、次第にドイツ軍を追い詰めにかかる場面を述べています。 >Further east the Third Army was forced back to the west of Verdun as German attacks were made on the Meuse Heights to the south-east but managed to maintain contact with Verdun and the Fourth Army to the west. German attacks against the Second Army south of Verdun from 5 September almost forced the French to retreat but on 8 September the crisis eased. ⇒さらに東では、第三方面軍がヴェルダンの西に押し戻された。ドイツの攻撃がミューズ高地から南東に向っていったが、第三方面軍は何とかして西のヴェルダンおよび第四方面軍との接触を維持することができた。9月5日から、ヴェルダン南の第二方面軍に対するドイツの攻撃は、フランス軍にほとんど退却のやむなきを迫っていたが、9月8日からは危機が緩んだ。 >By 10 September the German armies west of Verdun were retreating towards the Aisne and the Franco-British were following up, collecting stragglers and equipment. On 12 September Joffre ordered an outflanking move to the west and an attack northwards by the Third Army to cut off the German retreat. The pursuit was too slow and on 14 September the German armes (→armies) had dug in north of the Aisne and the Allies met trench lines rather than rearguards. ⇒9月10日までには、ヴェルダン西のドイツ軍はエスネ川の方へ撤退していたので、仏英軍はそれを追随して、落伍者と器材を収拾していった。9月12日、ジョフルはドイツ軍の退却路を断つべく、第三方面軍に包囲側面を西へ移動し、攻撃を北方に向けるよう命令した。追跡は遅々として進まなかった。9月14日、ドイツ方面軍はエスネ川の北で塹壕を掘って潜んだので、連合国軍としては後衛隊よりもむしろ塹壕組と相まみえることになった。 >Frontal attacks by the Ninth, Fifth and Sixth armies were repulsed on 15–16 September, which led Joffre to begin the transfer of the Second Army west to the left flank of the Sixth Army, the first phase of the Race to the Sea, a series of operations to outflank the German armies, which from 17 September to 17–19 October moved the opposing armies through Picardy and Flanders to the North Sea coast. ⇒第九、第五、第六方面軍による正面攻撃は、9月15–16日に撃退される羽目を食らった。それを見てジョフルは、第六方面軍の左側面へ向けて第二方面軍を西へ移動し始めることに(方向転換)した。それはドイツ軍の側面に回り込むための一連の作戦で、海へ出るレースの第一段階であった。そして、9月17日から10月17–19日にかけてピカルディやフランドルを通り、北海海岸まで対立する方面軍を動かしていった。

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モースから南西部にかけてドイツ軍の攻撃をうけ、第三軍の最西部はベルダンの西に後退したが、バーデンや西の第四軍との連携の維持に努めていた。 ドイツ軍は、9月5日からベルダン南の第二軍に攻撃を行い、フランス軍をほぼ敗退させようとしていたが、フランスは8日になって窮地を抜けた。 9月10日までにベルダン西のドイツ軍はエーヌに向けて引き上げ、フランス英国連合軍が落伍兵や装備をあつめながら跡を追った。 9月12日に、ジョフルは裏をかいて西に移動し北を攻撃してドイツ軍の退路を断つよう第三軍に命令した。しかし実行に時間を要しすぎてドイツ軍は9月14日にエーヌの北部にたどり着き、連合軍はより強固な塹壕線に遭遇した。 第九、第五、第六軍による前線攻撃は、9月15日~16日に反撃を受け、ジョフルは、第二軍を西から第六軍の左翼へと移動させた。ドイツ軍の側面に対する一連の作戦で、海に向かう競争の第一幕となった。9月17日から10月17ないし19日まで、ピカーデーとフランダースを通り北部海岸に至るまで慎重に軍を移動させた。

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