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Material assistance was given to the returning columns by the 52nd (Lowland) Division, in form of the loan of camels, water fantasses, sandcarts and gun horse teams, the latter going out on the commanding generals' initiative to meet the returning teams.At dressing station set up 3 miles (4.8 km) west of Magdhaba, by the New Zealand Field Ambulance Mobile Section and the 1st Light Horse Field Ambulance, 80 wounded were treated during the day of battle. Field ambulances performed urgent surgery, gave tetanus inoculations and fed patients. During the night after the battle, treated wounded were evacuated in sandcarts and on torturous cacolets to El Arish, with the No. 1 Ambulance Convoy assisting.

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>Material assistance was given to the returning columns by the 52nd (Lowland) Division, in form of the loan of camels, water fantasses*, sandcarts and gun horse teams, the latter going out on the commanding generals' initiative to meet the returning teams. ⇒第52(ローランド)師団によって、帰還する縦隊に物質的な補助が与えられた。それは、貸し出し形式のラクダ、水用ファンタス*、サンドカート(砂上運搬車)および銃装備の騎馬チームで、この後者(騎馬チーム)が、将軍の指令を受けて帰還するチームと接触すべく出かけていくのである。 *fantasses:動物の背などに乗せて飲料水を運搬するための大型ブリキ缶。 >At dressing station set up 3 miles (4.8 km) west of Magdhaba, by the New Zealand Field Ambulance Mobile Section and the 1st Light Horse Field Ambulance, 80 wounded were treated during the day of battle. ⇒ニュージーランド野戦救急隊移動班および第1軽騎馬野戦救急隊によって、マグダバの3マイル(4.8キロ)西に設立された救護舎では、戦闘当日の間に80人の負傷兵が手当てを受けた。 >Field ambulances performed urgent surgery, gave tetanus inoculations and fed patients. During the night after the battle, treated wounded were evacuated in sandcarts and on torturous cacolets to El Arish, with the No. 1 Ambulance Convoy assisting. ⇒野戦救急隊は、至急の外科施術を実行し、破傷風の接種を与え、患者に食餌を供給した。戦闘日後の夜、(応急)治療手当てを受けた負傷兵は、1番救急搬送隊の介助によって拷問台のようなカコレット(椅子つきの鞍)に乗せられ、サンドカートで運び出されてエル・アリシュへ向かった。

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