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Companies of the support battalions were located at the back of the forward zone with half in the pillboxes of the Albrecht Stellung. Dispersed in front of the Albrecht Stellung were divisional sharpshooter machine-gun nests. The Albrecht Stellung marked the front of the main zone with the Wilhelm Stellung (third line), located a further 2,000 yards (1,800 m) away, marking the rear of the main zone. This zone contained most of the field artillery supporting the front divisions. In pillboxes of the Wilhelm Stellung were reserve battalions of the front-line regiments in divisional reserve. The rearward zone, located between the Wilhelm Stellung and the Flandern I Stellung, contained the support and reserve assembly areas for the Eingreif divisions. The German failures at the Battle of Verdun in December 1916 and at the Battle of Arras in April 1917 had given more importance to these areas, since the forward zones had been overrun and the garrisons lost. It was anticipated that the main defensive engagement would take place in the main battle zone, against attackers who had been slowed and depleted by the forward garrisons, reinforced if need be by the Eingreif divisions. The Germans planned a rigid defence of the front system and forward zone supported by counter-attacks. Local withdrawals according to the concept of elastic defence, was rejected by Lossberg the new 4th Army Chief of Staff, who believed that they would disorganise troops moving forward to counter-attack. Front line troops were not expected to cling to shelters, which were man traps but evacuate them as soon as the battle began and move forward and to the flanks to avoid British fire and to counter-attack. A small number of machine-gun nests and permanent garrisons were separate from the counter-attack organisation, to provide a framework for the re-establishment of defence in depth once an attack had been repulsed. German infantry equipment had recently been improved by the arrival of thirty-six MG08/15 machine-guns per regiment, which gave German units more means for fire and manoeuvre.

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>Companies of the support battalions were located at the back of the forward zone with half in the pillboxes of the Albrecht Stellung. Dispersed in front of the Albrecht Stellung were divisional sharpshooter machine-gun nests. ⇒支援大隊に属する数個中隊が、前方地帯の背後とアルブレヒト陣地のピルボックスあたりで半々に陣取っていた。アルブレヒト陣地の前線には、師団の射手班のための機関銃巣が分散して置かれていた。 >The Albrecht Stellung marked the front of the main zone with the Wilhelm Stellung (third line), located a further 2,000 yards (1,800 m) away, marking the rear of the main zone. This zone contained most of the field artillery supporting the front divisions. In pillboxes of the Wilhelm Stellung were reserve battalions of the front-line regiments in divisional reserve. The rearward zone, located between the Wilhelm Stellung and the Flandern I Stellung, contained the support and reserve assembly areas for the Eingreif divisions. ⇒アルブレヒト陣地は、ウィルヘルム陣地(第3戦線)に対して主要地帯の前線を画して(占有して)、後者は2,000ヤード(1,800m)とずっと離れて主要地帯の後衛部を画していた。前線の諸師団を支える大部分の野戦砲はこの地帯に収容されていた。ウィルヘルム陣地のピルボックスには、師団予備隊という形で、最前線へ出る連隊の予備として数個大隊が控えていた。後衛部地帯は、ウィルヘルム陣地とフランドル第I陣地の間に位置して、アイングリーフ師団に対する支援隊と予備隊の集会地域を含んでいた。 >The German failures at the Battle of Verdun in December 1916 and at the Battle of Arras in April 1917 had given more importance to these areas, since the forward zones had been overrun and the garrisons lost. It was anticipated that the main defensive engagement would take place in the main battle zone, against attackers who had been slowed and depleted by the forward garrisons, reinforced if need be by the Eingreif divisions. ⇒1916年12月の「ヴェルダンの戦い」、および1917年4月の「アラスの戦い」でのドイツ軍の失敗は、これらの地域に重大な影響を与えた。というのも、前方地帯が蹂躙され、駐屯軍が失われたからである。主要な防御戦は、主要交戦地帯で起こることが予期された。そこでは、前方の駐屯軍が攻撃者の攻撃速度を削ぎ、消耗させる。その前方駐屯軍は、必要あらば、アイングリーフ師団によって補強される。 >The Germans planned a rigid defence of the front system and forward zone supported by counter-attacks. Local withdrawals according to the concept of elastic defence, was rejected by Lossberg the new 4th Army Chief of Staff, who believed that they would disorganise troops moving forward to counter-attack. Front line troops were not expected to cling to shelters, which were man traps but evacuate them as soon as the battle began and move forward and to the flanks to avoid British fire and to counter-attack. ⇒ドイツ軍は、反撃で支えられる前線システムと前方地帯の厳格な守備体制を計画した。新任の第4方面軍総司令官ロスベルクは、弾力性のある防御の概念に従って局地的な撤退を拒絶した。それは反撃するために進軍する軍隊を崩壊させしまうと思ったのである。前線付軍隊が避難所にしがみつくことは期待外であった。というのは、それが対兵士の策略で、戦いが始まったら可及的速やかに彼らを避難させて英国軍の砲火を避け、反撃するために前方や側面へ移動させるためであった。 >A small number of machine-gun nests and permanent garrisons were separate from the counter-attack organisation, to provide a framework for the re-establishment of defence in depth once an attack had been repulsed. German infantry equipment had recently been improved by the arrival of thirty-six MG08/15 machine-guns per regiment, which gave German units more means for fire and manoeuvre. ⇒少数の機関銃巣と、常駐する駐屯軍とは、一旦攻撃隊が撃退されたら、(即座に)縱深防御の再建体制を提供するために、反撃組織から離れた別働隊であった。ドイツ軍歩兵連隊の装備は、最近1個連隊につき36門のMG08/15型機関銃が配給され到着したことによって改善され、そのおかげでドイツ軍部隊の砲撃と機動作戦にとってはより多くの手段が与えられた。

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  • 英文翻訳をお願いします。

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