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英文を日本語訳して下さい。

Involving some 250 ships and 100,000 men, this battle off Denmark’s North Sea coast was the only major naval surface engagement of World War I. The battle began in the afternoon of May 31, 1916, with gunfire between the German and British scouting forces. When the main warships met, British Admiral John Jellicoe maneuvered his boats to take advantage of the fading daylight, scoring dozens of direct hits that eventually forced German Admiral Reinhard Scheer into retreat. Both sides claimed victory in this indecisive battle, though Britain retained control of the North Sea.

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約250隻の船舶と100,000人の兵士を巻き込んで、デンマークの北海沿岸沖のこの戦いは第一次世界大戦の唯一の大きな海上会戦であった。戦いは、1916年5月31日の午後、ドイツ軍と英国軍の偵察部隊の間の発砲をもって始まった。主要軍艦が対峙したとき、英国のジョン・ジェリコ提督は消えかかっている日光を利用するために彼のボートを機動させ、結局ドイツのR・シーア提督に何十もの直撃を記録して退却を余儀なくさせた。両軍とも、この勝勢は不明の戦いにおいて勝利を主張した。(ただ)英国は北海の制海権は保持した。 以下は、前々回分です(ちょっと違いがありましたので)。 5月に、シーアはフォン・ヒッパー提督に40隻の船を海へ引き出してデンマークの海岸沿いを移動するよう命じた。この動きのニュースは、ロシスにいるジェリコ提督のもとに届いた。彼は、挑発的な動きと取れるそのような大軍を見て、大艦隊の進水を命じた。(かくして)1916年5月31日に「ユトランドの戦闘」が始まった。敵艦隊の所在をつきとめるのは、かなり難しい仕事であることが判明した。航空偵察隊は、北海上で必要とされる距離をカバーしてもらうには極めて頼りなかった。したがって、相手の艦隊の所在を発見するために、双方の艦隊から、高速クルーザーが送り出された。双方が相手の所在を見つけたとき、短い砲撃合戦はあったが、しかし、双方とも(すでに)その任務 ― 敵を追い詰めること ― は果たし終えていた。

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