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At the outbreak of war in Europe in early August 1914, the German colonial administration in Kamerun attempted to offer neutrality with Britain and France in accordance with Articles 10 and 11 of the Berlin Act of 1885. However this was hastily rejected by the Allies. The French were eager to regain the land ceded to Germany in the Treaty of Fez in 1911. The first Allied expeditions into the colony on 6 August 1914 were from the east conducted by French troops from French Equatorial Africa under General Joseph Gaudérique Aymerich. This region was mostly marshland, undeveloped, and was initially not heavily contested by Germans. By 25 August 1914, British forces in present-day Nigeria had moved into Kamerun from three different points. They pushed into the colony towards Mara in the far north, towards Garua in the centre, and towards Nsanakang in the south. British forces moving towards Garua under the command of Colonel MacLear were ordered to push to the German border post at Tepe near Garua. The first engagement between British and German troops in the campaign took place at the Battle of Tepe, eventually resulting in German withdrawal. In the far north British forces attempted to take the German fort at Mora but initially failed. This resulted in a long siege of German positions which would last until the end of the campaign.British forces in the south attacking Nsanakang were defeated and almost completely destroyed by German counter-attacks at the Battle of Nsanakong. MacLear then pushed his forces further inland towards the German stronghold of Garua but was repulsed in the First Battle of Garua on 31 August.

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以下のとおりお答えします。植民地の争奪をめぐって、フランス軍や英国軍とドイツ軍との間の野戦について述べています。 >At the outbreak of war in Europe in early August 1914, the German colonial administration in Kamerun attempted to offer neutrality with Britain and France in accordance with Articles 10 and 11 of the Berlin Act of 1885. However this was hastily rejected by the Allies. The French were eager to regain the land ceded to Germany in the Treaty of Fez in 1911. The first Allied expeditions into the colony on 6 August 1914 were from the east conducted by French troops from French Equatorial Africa under General Joseph Gaudérique Aymerich. This region was mostly marshland, undeveloped, and was initially not heavily contested by Germans. ⇒1914年8月初め、ヨーロッパでの戦争突発の時に、カメルーンのドイツ植民地管理部によって、1885年の「ベルリン法」第10,11条項に従って英国とフランスに対する中立(の立場)を提供する試みがなされた。しかし、これは連合国により急遽拒絶された。フランス軍は、1911年に「フェズの条約」でドイツに譲渡した土地を取り戻したがっていた。1914年8月6日、連合軍の最初の植民地遠征は、ジョセフ・ゴドリク・エメリシュ将軍指揮下に、仏領赤道アフリカを発ったフランス軍によって東側から遂行された。この領域はほとんどが未開発の湿地帯なので、当初ドイツ軍は激しく競うことはなかった。 >By 25 August 1914, British forces in present-day Nigeria had moved into Kamerun from three different points. They pushed into the colony towards Mara in the far north, towards Garua in the centre, and towards Nsanakang in the south. British forces moving towards Garua under the command of Colonel MacLear were ordered to push to the German border post at Tepe near Garua. The first engagement between British and German troops in the campaign took place at the Battle of Tepe, eventually resulting in German withdrawal. ⇒1914年8月25日までに、現代のナイジェリアの英国軍は、3つの異なる地点からカメルーンに入り込んだ。彼らはそれぞれ、遠い北部にあるマーラ、中央部のガルア、および南部のンサナカンに向かって植民地に突き進んだ。マクリア大佐の指揮下ガルアに接近していた英国軍は、ガルア近くのテペでドイツ軍の境界基地へ押し入るよう命じられた。その英国軍とドイツ軍の間の野戦における最初の会戦は「テペの戦い」で起こったが、結局、ドイツ軍が撤退する結果となった。 >In the far north British forces attempted to take the German fort at Mora but initially failed. This resulted in a long siege of German positions which would last until the end of the campaign.British forces in the south attacking Nsanakang were defeated and almost completely destroyed by German counter-attacks at the Battle of Nsanakong. MacLear then pushed his forces further inland towards the German stronghold of Garua but was repulsed in the First Battle of Garua on 31 August. ⇒遠い北部の英国軍は、モーラでドイツ軍の要塞を奪取すべく試みたが、初めは失敗であった。これは、長期にわたるドイツ基地の包囲攻撃を結果として生じ、野戦の終わりまで続くことになった。南部のンサナカンへの攻撃では英国軍が敗北し、「ンサナカンの戦い」でドイツ軍の反撃によってほとんど完全に破壊された。そこでマクリアは、ガルアのドイツ軍要塞を目指して自軍をより遠い内陸に推進したが、8月31日に第1回目の「ガルアの戦い」において追い返された。

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  • 英文を和訳して下さい。

    By 25 August 1914, British forces in Nigeria had moved into Kamerun towards Mara in the far north, towards Garua in the center and towards Nsanakang in the south. British forces moving towards Garua under the command of Colonel MacLear were ordered to push to the German border post at Tepe near Garua. The first engagement between British and German troops in the campaign took place at the Battle of Tepe, eventually resulting in German withdrawal. In the far north British forces attempted to take the German fort at Mora but failed and began a siege which lasted until the end of the campaign. British forces in the south attacked Nsanakang and were defeated and almost completely destroyed by German counter-attacks at the Battle of Nsanakong. MacLear then pushed his forces further inland towards the German stronghold of Garua, but was repulsed in the First Battle of Garua on 31 August.

  • 英文和訳お願いいたします。

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  • お手数ですが、次の英文を訳して下さい。

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  • 次の英文を訳して下さい。

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    Döring also appealed for neutrality because of the economic interdependence of the West African colonies and their common interest in dominating local populations. On 6 August, the Cabinet in London refused the offer of neutrality and Bryant on his own initiative, after hearing that the French in Dahomey wished to co-operate, sent Captain Barker and the District Commissioner of Keta to Döring, with a demand the surrender of the colony and gave 24-hours to reply. The next morning the British intercepted a wireless message from Döring that he was withdrawing from the coast to Kamina and that Lomé would be surrendered if attacked. A similar proposal for neutrality from Döring had been received by the Governor of Dahomey, who took it for a declaration of war and ordered an invasion. A French contingency plan to seize Lomé and the coast had been drafted in ignorance of the wireless station at Kamina, only 37 mi (60 km) from the Dahomey border. Late on 6 August, French police occupied customs posts near Athieme and next day Major Maroix, the commander of French military forces in Dahomey, ordered the capture of Agbanake and Aneho. Agbanake was occupied late on 7 August, the Mono River was crossed and a column under Captain Marchand took Aneho early on 8 August; both moves were unopposed and local civilians helped to see off the Germans, by burning down the Government House at Sebe. The ~460 colonists and Askaris retreated inland, impressing civilians and calling up reservists as they moved north. Repairs began on the Aneho–Lomé railway and the French advanced to Porto Seguro and Togo before stopping the advance, once it was clear that Lomé had been surrendered to British forces. The British invasion began late on 7 August, the British emissaries returned to Lomé by lorry, to find that the Germans had left for Kamina and given Herr Clausnitzer discretion to surrender the colony up to Chra, 75 mi (120 km) inland, to prevent a naval bombardment of Lomé. On 8 August, the emissaries took command of fourteen British soldiers and police from Aflao; a telegraph operator arrived by bicycle and repaired the line to Keta and Accra. The British flag was raised and on 9 August, parties of troops arrived having marched 50 mi (80 km) in exhausting heat. Over the border, Bryant had arranged to move the main force by sea and embarked on the Elele on 10 August. Three other companies had been ordered to Krachi, to begin a land advance to Kamina. The Elele arrived off Lomé on 12 August and the force disembarked through the surf. Arrangements were made with the French, for a converging advance towards Atakpame by the British and the French from Aneho, a French column under Maroix from Tchetti in the north and the British column at Krachi under Captain Elgee.