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Small British forces on the northern border, were put under the command of Maroix and ordered to move south, as ~560 French cavalry were ordered across the northern border from Senegal and Niger, towards Sansane Mangu from 13–15 August. The British force at Lomé comprised 558 soldiers, 2,084 carriers, police and volunteers, who were preparing to advance inland, when Bryant received news of a German foray to Togblekove. The Battle of Bafilo was a skirmish between French and German troops in north-east Togoland on 13 August. French forces had crossed the border between French Dahomey and Togoland on 8–9 August. The French were engaged by German troops in the districts of Sansane-Mangu and Skode-Balfilo. The French company retreated, after facing greater resistance than expected. After the capture of Lomé on the coast, Bryant was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, made commander of all Allied forces in the operation and landed at Lomé on 12 August, with the main British force of 558 soldiers, 2,084 carriers, police and volunteers. As preparations began to advance northwards to Kamina, Bryant heard that a German party had travelled south by train the day before. The party had destroyed a small wireless transmitter and railway bridge at Togblekove, about 10 mi (16 km) to the north. Bryant detached half an infantry company on 12 August and sent another ​1 1⁄2 companies forward the next day, to prevent further attacks. By the evening, "I" Company had reached Tsevie, scouts reported that the country south of Agbeluvhoe was clear of German troops and the main force had reached Togblekove; at 10:00 p.m. "I" Company began to advance up the road to Agbeluvhoe. The relatively harsh terrain of bushland and swamp impeded the Allied push to Kamina, by keeping the invaders on the railway and the road, which had fallen into disrepair and was impassable by wheeled vehicles. Communication between the parties was difficult, because of the intervening high grass and thick scrub. The main force moved on from Togblekove at 6:00 a.m. on 15 August and at 8:30 a.m., local civilians told Bryant that a train full of Germans had steamed into Tsevie that morning and shot up the station. In the afternoon the British advanced guard met German troops near the Lili river, who blew the bridge and dug in on a ridge on the far side. The demolitions and the delaying action, held up the advance until 4:30 p.m. and the force spent the night at Ekuni rather than joining "I" Company as intended. Döring had sent two raiding parties with 200 men south in trains, to delay the advancing Allied force. "I" Company had heard the train run south at 4:00 a.m., while halted on the road near Ekuni, a village about 6 mi (9.7 km) south of Agbeluvhoe. A section was sent to cut off the train and the rest of "I" Company pressed on to Agbeluvhoe.

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>Small British forces on ~ of Sansane-Mangu and Skode-Balfilo. ⇒北部国境にいる小規模の英国軍団は、マロワの指揮下に置かれ、560人ほどのフランス騎兵隊(の一部)として860年13月15日-15日にセネガルとニジェールから北部国境を越えてサンサン・マニュに向かって移動するよう命じられた。ロメの英国軍は、558人の兵士、2,084人の輸送隊、警察および志願兵で構成されていて、内地への進軍の準備をしていたが、そのときブライアントはトグブレコブに向かうドイツ軍の急襲(略奪)隊のニュースを受け取った。「バフィロの戦い」は、8月13日にトーゴランド北東部におけるフランス軍とドイツ軍の間の小競り合いであった。フランス軍団は、8月8日-9日にフランス領ダホミーとトーゴランドの国境を越えた。フランス軍は、サンセン-マニュとスコド-バフィロの地区でドイツ軍から交戦を仕かけられた。 >The French company retreated, ~ to prevent further attacks. ⇒フランス軍の中隊は予想以上に大きな抵抗に直面して、その後退却した。ブライアントは、沿岸でロメを攻略した後中佐に昇進し、この作戦中の全連合国軍の司令官となって8月12日に、558人の兵士、2,084人の輸送隊、警察および志願兵からなる主力英国軍を伴ってロメに上陸した。編成隊が北からカミナまで進み始めたとき、ブライアントはドイツ軍の一行が前日に列車で南へ旅立ったと聞いた。この一行が、北へ10マイル(16キロ)のトグブレコブにある小さな無線送信機と鉄道橋を破壊した。ブライアントは8月12日に歩兵中隊の1/2個(半個隊)を派遣したが、さらなる攻撃を防ぐために翌日別の1個隊半を送った。 >By the evening, "I" Company* had reached Tsevie, scouts reported that the country south of Agbeluvhoe was clear of German troops and the main force had reached Togblekove; at 10:00 p.m. "I" Company began ~ by wheeled vehicles. ⇒夕方ごろ、「第I」中隊*がツェビーに到着したところ、アグベルフォー南部の国ではドイツ軍が引き払っていて、主力軍はトグブレコブに到着した、と偵察隊が報じた。午後10時、「第I」中隊はアグベルフォーへの道を進め始めた。森林帯と湿地帯の比較的過酷な地形が連合国軍によるカミナへの押し込みを妨げ、鉄道や道路に沿った侵略者たちを拒み続け、車輪類は故障状態と通行不能に追い込まれた。 *"I" Company「第I」中隊:先発隊は中途半端な人数の中隊なので、このようなカッコ付きで表しているものと見られる。 >Communication between the parties ~ ridge on the far side. ⇒高い草と厚い雑木類が介在しているため、当事者間のコミュニケーションは困難であった。主力部隊(後発隊)は8月15日の午前6時と午後8時30分にトグブレコブから移動したが、その日の朝ドイツ軍人でいっぱいの列車がツェビーに入ってきて駅に向かって発砲したと地元の民間人らがブライアントに伝えた。午後、英国の先進防衛隊がリリ川の近くでドイツ軍に遭遇したところ、彼らは橋を吹き飛ばし、向こう側の尾根の塹壕にこもった。 >The demolitions and the delaying ~ pressed on to Agbeluvhoe. ⇒破壊や遅延を引き起こされた戦闘行動のせいで部隊は午後4時30分まで前進を遅らせ、(この主力部隊の)意図したように「第I」中隊に合流するのではなく、エクニで夜を過ごした。デーリングは、連合国軍の前進を遅らせるために、200人の兵士をもって2個の襲撃隊を列車で南に送った。「第I」中隊は、アグベルフォーから6マイル(9.7キロ)南にある村エクニ近くの道路で停止している間に、午前4時に列車が南に走るのを聞いた。列車切断のために1個小隊が送られ、残りの「第I」中隊はアグベルフォーに向かって進んだ。

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