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英文を日本語に訳してください

次の英文を日本語に訳してください! Some baseball fans and players didn't welcome Robinson at first. But the playrs that he made on the field moved them. Soon he became a symbol of hope to millions especially to African-Americans. After he retired in 1957 he kept fighting for a free and equal world. He joined the civil rights movement led by Martin Luther King Jr. He died in 1972. His life really had a strong impact on many people. The value of a life is measured by its impact on other people. That is the message that he left for us. お願いします(´>ω<`)

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  • 回答No.1
  • Him-hymn
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Some baseball fans and players didn't welcome Robinson at first. はじめはロビンソンを歓迎しない野球ファンと野球選手がいました。 But the players that he made on the field moved them. playrs → players しかし、彼が野手に仕立てた選手たちは彼らに感動を与えた。 Soon he became a symbol of hope to millions especially to African-Americans. すぐに、彼は何百万の人、とりわけアフリカ系アメリカ人にとって希望のシンボルとなった。 After he retired in 1957 he kept fighting for a free and equal world. He joined the civil rights movement led by Martin Luther King Jr. 1957年に引退した後、彼は自由で平等な世界のために闘い続けた。 マルチン・ルーサー・キング・ジュニアに導かれた公民権運動に参加した。 He died in 1972. 1972年に亡くなった。 His life really had a strong impact on many people. その生涯は多くの人々に強いインパクト(衝撃)を与えた。 The value of a life is measured by its impact on other people. 人生の価値は、他人に与えるインパクトで計れる。 That is the message that he left for us. そのことが、彼が私たちに残したメッセージだ。 以上でいかがでしょうか。

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役に立ちました!

その他の回答 (2)

  • 回答No.3

いくつかの野球ファンや選手は、最初はロビンソンを歓迎しなかった。 しかし、彼はフィールドで行われた選手たちは、それらを移動しました。 すぐに彼は特にアフリカ系アメリカ人の何百万人への希望の象徴となった。 彼は1957年に引退後、彼は自由で平等な世界のために戦い続け。 彼はマーティン·ルーサー·キング·ジュニア率いる公民権運動に参加 彼は1972年に死亡した。 彼の人生は、本当に多くの人々に強いインパクトを与えた。 人生の価値は、他の人への影響によって測定されます。 それは彼が私たちのために残されたメッセージです。 playrsでなくてplayersでは?と思い勝手にかえてしまいましたが playrsであっていたのでしょうか

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そうです間違いです(笑) ありがとうございました。

  • 回答No.2
  • sayshe
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野球ファンや選手の中には、最初、ロビンソンを歓迎しない人たちもいました。 しかし、彼が球場で見せるプレーは、彼らを感動させました。 すぐに、彼は数百万人にとって、特にアフリカ系アメリカ人にとって希望の象徴になりました。 1957年に引退したあと、彼は自由で平等な世界のために戦い続けました。 彼は、マーティン・ルーサー・キング・ジュニアに指導される市民権運動に加わりました。 彼は、1972年に亡くなりました。 彼の人生は、多くの人々に本当に強い影響を及ぼしました。 人生の価値は、他の人々に与えるその影響で測られます。 それが、彼が我々に残したメッセージです。

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ありがとうございます(・v・pq)

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