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お願いします。  Prince Ashoka Maurya had two kinds of heroes.The first were the deities of the Vedic scriptures and the prince and princesses who served them in sacred texts such as the Mahabharata and the Ramayana.These religious heroes taught him the satisfaction of living with honor and justice(dharma),the excitement of money and succesr(artha),and the contentment of enjoying the world's beauties and pleasures(kama).They taught him that if he filled his life with these qualities of honor,excellence,and beauty,he would reach moksha,when the cycle of life,death,and rebirth would end.   That all sounded good to Prince Ashoka.But so did the adventures of his second kind of hero-the warrior heroes like his father,King Bindusara,and his grandfather,Chandragupta.Ashoka loved fighting,and he was good at it.He may well have gone to a military academy like the one in Taxila.Brahmins and Kshatriya came there from all over the subcontinent to learn military science,including the use of the eight major eapoms.Brahmins shot bows,the Kshatriya were swordsmen,the Vaishya used the lance,and the Shudra wielded the mace-a heavy,spiked,hammerlike weapon.The teacher was skilled in all those weapons plus the disk(chakra),the spear,and fighting with his bare hands.Brahmin and Kshatriya students were also trained to command a war elephant.  Military academies like the one in Taxila show how important war was to the people of Ashoka's time.Each town had its own central armory,a strong building for storing weapons,run by a superintendet.The government kept such tight control over its weapons that all soldiers had to return their arms to the armory after they practiced each morning.No one could carry a weapon unless he had special permit.

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 アショカ・マウリヤ王子には、2種類の英雄がいました。 1つ目は、ベーダ聖典の神々や、例えばマハーバーラタやラーマヤーナの様な聖典の中で彼らに仕えた王子や王女たちでした。 これらの宗教的な英雄は、彼に高潔で正義の生活を送る満足感(自然の法)、お金と成功の興奮(アルサ)、世界の美や喜びを楽しむ満足(カーマ)を教えました。彼が人生を名誉、優秀さ、美しさと言ったこれらの性質で満たすならば、彼が解脱に達し、その時は、生、死、再生の輪廻が終わるだろうと、彼らは彼に教えました。  それは、すべて、アショカ王子にはよいことに思えました。 しかし、彼の2番目の種類の英雄 ― 彼の父ビンドゥサラ王や彼の祖父チャンドラグプタの様な戦士の英雄 ― の冒険も素晴らしいように思えました。 アショカは戦うのが好きでした、そして、彼はそれが得意でした。 彼が、タキシラにある様な士官学校に行ったのももっともでした。バラモンやクシャトリヤが、8つの主要な武器の使用を含む軍事学を学ぶために、亜大陸中からそこに来ました。 バラモンは弓を射ました、クシャトリヤは剣士でした、バイシャは槍を使いました、そして、シュードラはメイス(槌矛) ― 大型の、釘の付いた、ハンマー状の武器 ― を用いました。教師は、それらすべての武器、さらに、円盤(チャクラ)、槍、素手での戦いに熟練していました。 バラモンとクシャトリヤの学生は、戦闘用の象を操る訓練もうけました。  タキシラにあるものような士官学校は、アショカ時代の人々にとって戦争がいかに重要かを示します。 それぞれの町は、そこ独自の中央兵器庫(武器を保存するための頑丈な建物)を管理者に運営させました。 毎朝、訓練したあとすべての兵士が兵器庫に彼らの武器を戻さなければならないと言うような武器に対する厳しいコントロールを、政府は維持しました。 特別な許可がない限り、誰も武器を持つことができませんでした。

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