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英語 長文の和訳を教えてください。

Perhaps more importantly, the seeds of japanese culture were spread in the united states by the almost two million americans who came to japan during the occupation. While they represented only about one percent of the population, they had a tremendous influence on the american image of japan. As each of them returned to the U.S., they brought tales of life in this strange, exotic country which spread to their friends, relatives and neighbors.

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恐らく、より重要なことには、日本の文化の起源は、占有の間に漆器に来たほとんど200万amアメリカ人によって結合した状態で広げられました。人口のわずか約1パーセントしか相当しなかった一方、それらは漆器のアメリカ人のイメージにすさまじい影響がありました。それらの各々が米国に返すように、それらは、友達、親類および隣人に広がる、この奇妙で新種の国の生活の物語をもたらしました。 あとはがんばれ\(*⌒0⌒)♪

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  • sayshe
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おそらくより重要なことは、占領期間中、日本に来たほぼ200万人のアメリカ人によって、日本文化の種は、アメリカ合衆国に広げられたと言うことです。 彼らは、人口のわずか約1パーセントを代表するにすぎませんが、彼らはアメリカ人の日本のイメージに対する相当な影響がありました。 彼らの一人一人が米国に戻るにつれて、この見知らぬ、エキゾチックな国の物語をもたらしました、そして、その物語は、彼らの友人、親類、隣人へと広がていったのです。

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