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A rescue effort by Major William J. "Wild Bill" Donovan was begun in haste attempting to dig the men but their efforts were hampered by mud-slides and continued enemy shelling. :pp.167–171 Two men were rescued and five dead were recovered before efforts had to be halted. The voices other men could be heard for a while, but the remaining fifteen men died before rescue efforts could resume. :pp.167–171 Donovan was awarded the French Croix de Guerre for his actions during the attempted rescue. :pp.209–210 Poet and literary critic Joyce Kilmer, a sergeant with the regiment, wrote the 1918 poem "Rouge Bouquet" (also called "The Wood Called Rouge Bouquet" to commemorate the soldiers in his unit who died. :pp.175–176 The poem was first read by Kilmer at the memorial service held on the battlefield a few days later. :pp.175–176 It first appeared in print in the American serviceman's newspaper Stars and Stripes—published two weeks after Kilmer died in combat in the Second Battle of the Marne on 30 July 1918. The Battle of Tell 'Asur, known as the Action of Tell 'Asur also known as the Battle of Turmus 'Aya, took place between 8 and 12 March 1918, after the decisive victory at the Battle of Jerusalem and the Capture of Jericho during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I. Fighting took place over an area which extended from the Mediterranean to Abu Tellul and Mussalabeh on the edge of the Jordan Valley. After the Capture of Jericho by the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) in February 1918 the occupation of the Jordan Valley began. However, the captured territory was not sufficiently broad to provide a strong enough base for the planned Transjordan operations. The EEF's front line was successfully pushed northwards following attacks by the XX and XXI Corps against the Ottoman Seventh Army and Eighth Army. At the end of March the First Transjordan attack on Amman was launched to be followed the next month by the Second Transjordan attack on Shunet Nimrin and Es Salt.General Edmund Allenby's right flank was secure but was not sufficiently broad to support the planned operations across the Jordan to the Hedjaz railway.

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>A rescue effort by Major William J. "Wild Bill" Donovan was begun in haste attempting to dig the men but their efforts were hampered by mud-slides and continued enemy shelling. :pp.167–171 Two men were rescued and five dead were recovered before efforts had to be halted. The voices other men could be heard for a while, but the remaining fifteen men died before rescue efforts could resume. :pp.167–171 Donovan was awarded the French Croix de Guerre for his actions during the attempted rescue. :pp.209–210 ⇒「野生のビル」ことウィリアム・J.ドノバンによる救助の努力が開始され、急遽埋まった兵士の掘り出しにかかったが、泥流と打ち続く敵の砲撃によって彼らの努力は妨げられた:167-171ページ。救出活動を中断せざるを得なくなる前に2人の兵が救出されて、5人の死亡者が埋め戻された。しばらくの間他の兵の声が聞かれたけれども、救助努力が再開できる前に残りの15人が死亡した:167-171ページ。ドノバンは、救助を試みる間の行動によってフランス軍の戦功十字章を授与された:209-210ページ。 >Poet and literary critic Joyce Kilmer, a sergeant with the regiment, wrote the 1918 poem "Rouge Bouquet" (also called "The Wood Called Rouge Bouquet" to commemorate the soldiers in his unit who died. :pp.175–176 The poem was first read by Kilmer at the memorial service held on the battlefield a few days later. :pp.175–176 It first appeared in print in the American serviceman's newspaper Stars and Stripes—published two weeks after Kilmer died in combat in the Second Battle of the Marne on 30 July 1918. ⇒詩人兼文学評論家にして連隊付軍曹のジョイス・キルマーは、彼の部隊で戦死した兵士を記念するため、1918年に「ルージュブーケ」という詩(「ルージュ・ブーケという名の森」とも呼ばれる)を書いた:175-176ページ。この詩は、数日後に戦場で行われた記念式典でキルマーによって初めて詠唱された:175-176ページ。それは、1918年7月30日の「第2次マルヌの戦い」の戦闘でキルマーが死んだ2週後に、アメリカの軍人新聞「星条旗」で初めて印刷に付され、出版された。 >The Battle of Tell 'Asur, known as the Action of Tell 'Asur also known as the Battle of Turmus 'Aya, took place between 8 and 12 March 1918, after the decisive victory at the Battle of Jerusalem and the Capture of Jericho during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I. Fighting took place over an area which extended from the Mediterranean to Abu Tellul and Mussalabeh on the edge of the Jordan Valley. ⇒「テル・'アッシュールの戦い」(「テル・'アッシュールの戦闘」あるいは「ツルムス・'アヤの戦い」としても知られる)は、「エルサレムの戦い」の決定的な勝利と第一次世界大戦中の「シナイ半島とパレスチナ野戦」間でのエリコ攻略の後、1918年3月8日から12日にかけて起こった。戦いは、地中海からヨルダン渓谷の縁にあるアブ・テルルやムサラベにかけて広がる地域で起こった。 >After the Capture of Jericho by the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) in February 1918 the occupation of the Jordan Valley began. However, the captured territory was not sufficiently broad to provide a strong enough base for the planned Transjordan operations. The EEF's front line was successfully pushed northwards following attacks by the XX and XXI Corps against the Ottoman Seventh Army and Eighth Army. At the end of March the First Transjordan attack on Amman was launched to be followed the next month by the Second Transjordan attack on Shunet Nimrin and Es Salt.General Edmund Allenby's right flank was secure but was not sufficiently broad to support the planned operations across the Jordan to the Hedjaz railway. ⇒エジプト遠征軍(EEF)による1918年2月の「エリコの攻略」の後に、ヨルダン渓谷の占拠が始まった。しかし、攻略された領域は、計画されたトランスヨルダン作戦行動のための基地を提供するのに十分広くはなかった。EEFの前線では、第XX、第XXI軍団がオスマントルコ軍第7、第8方面軍に対抗して、それを首尾よく北へ押し上げ、それに攻撃隊が続いた。アンマンでの「第1次トランスヨルダン攻撃」が3月末に終り、続いて翌月シュネット・ニムリンとエス・ソルトへの「第2次トランスヨルダン攻撃」が開始された。エドムンド・アレンビー将軍の右翼は、安全ではあったが、ヨルダンを横切ってヘジャズ鉄道へ進撃すべく計画された作戦行動を支援するのに十分な広がりはなかった。

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