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On 15 March French abandoned the offensive, as the supply of field-gun ammunition was inadequate. News of the ammunition shortage led to the Shell Crisis of 1915 which, along with the failed attack on the Dardanelles, brought down the Liberal British government under the premiership of H. H. Asquith. He formed a new coalition government and appointed David Lloyd George as Minister of Munitions. It was a recognition that the whole economy would have to be adapted for war, if the Allies were to prevail on the Western Front. The battle also affected British tactical thinking with the idea that infantry offensives accompanied by artillery barrages could break the stalemate of trench warfare. Of the 40,000 Allied troops in the battle, 7,000 British and 4,200 Indian casualties were suffered. The 7th Division had 2,791 casualties, the 8th Division 4,814 losses, the Meerut Division 2,353 casualties and the Lahore Division 1,694 losses. In 2010 Humphries and Maker recorded German casualties from 9–20 March as c. 10,000 men and in 2018, Jonathan Boff wrote that the British suffered 12,592 casualties and that the German official history estimate of "almost 10,000 men", was closer to 8,500 according to the records of the 6th Army and the diary kept by Crown Prince Rupprecht. The 6th Bavarian Reserve Division lost 6,017 men from 11–13 March, Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 21 losing 1,665 casualties, Infantry Regiment 14 of the VII Corps lost 666 troops from 7–12 March. Infantry Regiment 13 lost 1,322 casualties from 6–27 March. The Neuve-Chapelle Indian Memorial commemorates 4,700 Indian soldiers and labourers who died on the Western Front during the whole of the First World War and have no known graves; the location was chosen because it was at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle that the Indian Corps fought its first major action. War graves of the Indian Corps and the Indian Labour Corps are found at Ayette, Souchez and Neuve-Chapelle. The Battle of Más a Tierra was a World War I sea battle fought on 14 March 1915, near the Chilean island of Más a Tierra, between a British squadron and a German light cruiser. The battle saw the last remnant of the German East Asia Squadron destroyed, when SMS Dresden was cornered and sunk in Cumberland Bay. After escaping from the Battle of the Falkland Islands, SMS Dresden and several auxiliaries retreated into the Pacific Ocean in an attempt to resume commerce raiding operations against Allied shipping. These operations did little to stop shipping in the area, but still proved troublesome to the British, who had to expend resources to counter the cruiser. The Battle of Más a Tierra マスアティエラの戦い

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>On 15 March French abandoned the offensive, as the supply of field-gun ammunition was inadequate. News of the ammunition shortage led to the Shell Crisis of 1915 which, along with the failed attack on the Dardanelles, brought down the Liberal British government under the premiership of H. H. Asquith. He formed a new coalition government and appointed David Lloyd George as Minister of Munitions. It was a recognition that the whole economy would have to be adapted for war, if the Allies were to prevail on the Western Front. The battle also affected British tactical thinking with the idea that infantry offensives accompanied by artillery barrages could break the stalemate of trench warfare. ⇒3月15日、フランス軍は攻撃を放棄したが、それは野戦砲の弾薬供給が不十分だったためであった。弾薬不足のニュースは、ダーダネルスへの攻撃失敗とともに1915年の「砲弾危機」を引き起こし、H. H.アスキス首相のもとで自由英国の政府が倒れるに至った。彼は新しい連合政府を編成し、デビッド・ロイド=ジョージを軍需大臣に任命した。連合国軍が西部戦線で勝つためには、経済全体が戦争に適応しなければならない、という認識であった。戦闘はまた、砲兵隊の集中砲撃が歩兵隊の攻勢に伴えば塹壕戦の行き詰まりを打破できる、という考えが英国軍の戦術的思考に影響を与えた。 >Of the 40,000 Allied troops in the battle, 7,000 British and 4,200 Indian casualties were suffered. The 7th Division had 2,791 casualties, the 8th Division 4,814 losses, the Meerut Division 2,353 casualties and the Lahore Division 1,694 losses. In 2010 Humphries and Maker recorded German casualties from 9–20 March as c. 10,000 men and in 2018, Jonathan Boff wrote that the British suffered 12,592 casualties and that the German official history estimate of "almost 10,000 men", was closer to 8,500 according to the records of the 6th Army and the diary kept by Crown Prince Rupprecht. ⇒戦闘中の40,000人の連合国軍のうち、7,000人の英国人と4,200人のインド人の犠牲者が出た。第7師団は2,791人の負傷者、第8師団は4,814人の負傷者、ミーラト師団は2,353人の負傷者、ラホール師団は1,694人の負傷者を被った。2010年、ハンフリーズとメーカーは、3月9日-20日に10,000人のドイツ軍兵士の死傷者を記録した。そして、2018年、ジョナサン・ボフは書いている。英国軍は12,592人の死傷者を出したが、ドイツ軍公報史はそれを「ほぼ10,000人」と推定し、第6方面軍の記録とルプレヒト皇太子が記録した日記によると、それは8,500人に近い数値だったという。 >The 6th Bavarian Reserve Division lost 6,017 men from 11–13 March, Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 21 losing 1,665 casualties, Infantry Regiment 14 of the VII Corps lost 666 troops from 7–12 March. Infantry Regiment 13 lost 1,322 casualties from 6–27 March. The Neuve-Chapelle Indian Memorial commemorates 4,700 Indian soldiers and labourers who died on the Western Front during the whole of the First World War and have no known graves; the location was chosen because it was at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle that the Indian Corps fought its first major action. War graves of the Indian Corps and the Indian Labour Corps are found at Ayette, Souchez and Neuve-Chapelle. ⇒第6バイエルン予備軍師団は3月11日-13日に6,017人を失い、バイエルン予備軍歩兵連隊21は1,665人の負傷者を、第7歩兵連隊14は3月7日-12日に666人の軍隊を失った。歩兵連隊13は、3月6日から27日までに1,322人の死傷者を出した。「ヌーヴ・シャペルのインド人記念墓地」は、第一次世界大戦中に西部戦線で亡くなり、墓が(分から)なかった4,700人のインド兵と労働者を記念している。この場所が選ばれた理由は、インド軍が最初の主要な戦闘行動として戦ったのが「ヌーヴ・シャペルの戦い」であったからである。インド軍団とインド労働者隊の戦争墓地は、アイエット、スーシェ、およびヌーヴ・シャペルにある。 >The Battle of Más a Tierra was a World War I sea battle fought on 14 March 1915, near the Chilean island of Más a Tierra, between a British squadron and a German light cruiser. The battle saw the last remnant of the German East Asia Squadron destroyed, when SMS Dresden was cornered and sunk in Cumberland Bay. After escaping from the Battle of the Falkland Islands, SMS Dresden and several auxiliaries retreated into the Pacific Ocean in an attempt to resume commerce raiding operations against Allied shipping. These operations did little to stop shipping in the area, but still proved troublesome to the British, who had to expend resources to counter the cruiser. ⇒「マスアティエラの戦い」は、1915年3月14日にチリのマスアティエラ島の近くで、英国軍の戦隊とドイツ軍の軽巡洋艦の間で行われた第一次世界大戦の海戦であった。この戦闘では、SMSドレスデン号が追い詰められてクンベルランド湾に沈められたときに、ドイツ東アジア戦隊の最後の残党が破壊された。SMSドレスデン号と数隻の補助部隊は、「フォークランド諸島の戦い」から脱出した後、連合国軍に対する海運商船襲撃作戦を再開しようとして太平洋に退却した。これらの作戦行動は、この地域での出荷を止めることはほとんどなかったが、巡洋艦に対抗するために資源を費やさなければならない英国軍にとっては、依然として厄介で煩わしいものであった。

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