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The country on the eastern side of the Judean Hills falls into the Jordan Valley in a confused mass of rocky ridges and deep narrow valleys. All the main wadis run from west to east; often with steep high banks, while the tributaries joined from all directions, breaking up the ridges making the hills, almost impossible to cross. Most tracks ran along the narrow beds of ravines where progress had to be made in single file. Further north at Jebel Kuruntul (also known as Jebel Quruntul, the Mount of Temptation and Mount Quarantania) the mountains end abruptly in a 1,000-foot (300 m) cliff. Sometimes the attacking parties had to haul themselves and each other over abrupt cliffs to be in a position to fight at close quarters at the top. Yet, in early Spring, the area was covered by wild flowers including cyclamen, anemones, poppies and tulips. Three Ottoman armies were deployed to defend their front line: the Eighth Army (headquartered at Tul Keram) defended the Mediterranean section, the Seventh Army (headquartered at Nablus) defended the Judean Hills sector, and the Fourth Army (headquartered at Amman) defended the eastern Transjordan section of the line. Between 3,000 and 5,000 Ottoman troops from the 26th and 53rd Infantry Divisions XX Corps defended the area on the western edge of the Jordan Valley. They garrisoned a series of hill-tops from Tubk el Kaneiterah, near the Dead Sea, through Talat ed Dumm to the Wadi Fara. Here the XX Corps was entrenched at Ras um Deisis and El Muntar Iraq Ibrahim astride the Jericho road. There was also at least one regiment in the Jordan Valley near the Wadi el Auja. By February, logistics had sufficiently developed to support the advance towards Jericho, and Allenby ordered Lieutenant General Philip Chetwode to capture Jericho as soon as the weather cleared. While the remainder of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force held the front line and garrisoned the captured territories in southern Palestine, Chetwode's XX Corps the 60th (2/2nd London) Division was to make the attack towards Jericho, supported by his 53rd (Welsh) Division and one infantry brigade from the 74th (Yeomanry) Division on the left.

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>The country on the eastern side of the Judean Hills falls into the Jordan Valley in a confused mass of rocky ridges and deep narrow valleys. All the main wadis run from west to east; often with steep high banks, while the tributaries joined from all directions, breaking up the ridges making the hills, almost impossible to cross. Most tracks ran along the narrow beds of ravines where progress had to be made in single file. Further north at Jebel Kuruntul (also known as Jebel Quruntul, the Mount of Temptation and Mount Quarantania)* the mountains end abruptly in a 1,000-foot (300 m) cliff. ⇒ユダヤ・ヒルズ東側の田園は、多数の岩がちの尾根と深く狭い谷とが入り混じってヨルダン渓谷に落ちる。主なワジ(枯れ谷)すべてが西から東へ走っている。しばしばあらゆる方向からの支流が合流しながらも、急勾配の高い岸壁があって、ほとんど渡ることが不可能なヒルを形成する尾根が散在する。トラックは、ほとんど谷間の狭い川床に沿って一列になって進まなければならなかった。ジェブル・クルンツル(またの名、「クアランタニア山」ないし「誘惑の山」として知られる)*のさらに北では、山々が突然1,000フィート(300m)の断崖になって終わる。 *Jebel Kuruntul「ジェブル・クルンツル」:アラブ地域の「山、丘」を意味し、固有名詞に冠して、その一部のようにして用いられる(クルンツルヤマ)。 >Sometimes the attacking parties had to haul themselves and each other over abrupt cliffs to be in a position to fight at close quarters at the top. Yet, in early Spring, the area was covered by wild flowers including cyclamen, anemones, poppies and tulips. Three Ottoman armies were deployed to defend their front line: the Eighth Army (headquartered at Tul Keram) defended the Mediterranean section, the Seventh Army (headquartered at Nablus) defended the Judean Hills sector, and the Fourth Army (headquartered at Amman) defended the eastern Transjordan section of the line. ⇒時々、諸攻撃部隊は頂上の狭苦しい所で戦うために、険しい断崖上で自身およびお互いを引きずるように動いて陣地を確保する必要があった。しかし早春のこの地域は、シクラメン、アネモネ、ケシ、およびチューリップを含む野生の花に覆われていた。3個のオスマントルコ方面軍が前線を防御するために布陣していた。すなわち、第8方面軍(ツル・ケラムに本部を置く)は地中海地区を防御し、第7方面軍(ナブルスに本部を置く)はユダヤ・ヒルズ地区を防御し、第4方面軍(アンマンに本部を置く)は線戦東のトランスヨルダン地区を防御していた。 >Between 3,000 and 5,000 Ottoman troops from the 26th and 53rd Infantry Divisions XX Corps defended the area on the western edge of the Jordan Valley. They garrisoned a series of hill-tops from Tubk el Kaneiterah, near the Dead Sea, through Talat ed Dumm to the Wadi Fara. Here the XX Corps was entrenched at Ras um Deisis and El Muntar Iraq Ibrahim astride the Jericho road. There was also at least one regiment in the Jordan Valley near the Wadi el Auja. ⇒第26、第53歩兵師団第XX軍団から来た3,000ないし5,000人のオスマントルコ軍がヨルダン渓谷の西端地域を防御していた。彼らは、死海近くのツブク・エル・カネイテラフからタラト・エド・ドゥムを通ってワジ・ファラに至るまでの一連のヒル・トップに駐屯していた。ここでは、第XX軍団が、エリコ道路にまたがるラス・ウム・デイスィスとエル・ムンタル・イラク・イブラヒムで塹壕にこもっていた。ワジ・エル・アウジャ近くのヨルダン渓谷には、少なくとも1個連隊が駐屯していた。 >By February, logistics had sufficiently developed to support the advance towards Jericho, and Allenby ordered Lieutenant General Philip Chetwode to capture Jericho as soon as the weather cleared. While the remainder of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force held the front line and garrisoned the captured territories in southern Palestine, Chetwode's XX Corps the 60th (2/2nd London) Division was to make the attack towards Jericho, supported by his 53rd (Welsh) Division and one infantry brigade from the 74th (Yeomanry) Division on the left. ⇒2月までには兵站業務が十分に展開して、エリコ方面への進軍を支援できたので、アレンビーは、フィリップ・チェトウォード中将に、天候が晴れたら直ちにエリコを攻略するよう命じた。エジプト遠征軍の残存兵が前線を保持して、南パレスチナで攻略した領域に駐屯する間、チェトウォードの第XX軍団第60(第2/2ロンドン)師団が、彼の第53(ウェールズ)師団、および左翼上の第74(ヨーマンリー)師団から来た歩兵1個旅団の支援を得て、エリコ方面を攻撃することになった。

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