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Six more German aircraft were shot down by RFC and Royal Naval Air Service ("RNAS") pilots over the battlefield. Operations further afield were reduced due to the low cloud but three German airfields were attacked and an offensive patrol over the front line intercepted German bombers and escorts and drove them off. German 4th Army Despite difficulties at the extremities of the attack front, by mid-morning most British objectives had been gained and consolidated. The Germans launched several counter-attacks, with the Eingreif divisions supported by the equivalent of ten normal divisional artilleries. Clearing weather assisted early observation of the German counter-attacks, most of which were repulsed by accurate and heavy artillery and small-arms fire, causing many German casualties. At Zonnebeke a local counter-attack by the 34th Fusilier Regiment (3rd Reserve Division) was attempted around 6:45 a.m., with part of the 2nd battalion (in support) advancing to reinforce the 3rd Battalion holding the front line and the reserve battalion (1st) joining the counter-attack, after advancing west over Broodseinde ridge. The order reached the troops south of the Ypres–Roulers railway quickly, who attacked immediately. The companies south of Zonnebeke advanced and were overrun by British troops on the Grote Molen spur and taken prisoner. Closer to the railway, troops reached the lake near Zonnebeke church and were pinned down by a British machine-gun already dug-in nearby. The counter-attack order was delayed north of the railway and the counter-attack there did not begin until the 1st Battalion (in reserve) arrived. The battalion was able to descend the slope from Broodseinde covered by mist and smoke, which led to few losses but some units losing direction. The British barrage near the village caused many casualties but the survivors pressed on through it and at 7:30 a.m. reached the remnants of the 3rd Battalion near the level crossing north of the village, just in time to hold off a renewed British attack 200 yd (180 m) short of their position, as stray German troops trickled in.

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>Six more German aircraft were shot down by RFC* and Royal Naval Air Service ("RNAS") pilots over the battlefield. Operations further afield were reduced due to the low cloud but three German airfields were attacked and an offensive patrol over the front line intercepted German bombers and escorts and drove them off. ⇒さらにドイツ軍航空機6機が、戦場上空のRFC(英国空軍)*および英国海軍航空隊(「RNAS」)のパイロットにより撃ち落とされた。遠い戦場での航空作戦行動は低い雲のために減らされたが、3か所のドイツ軍用飛行場を攻撃して、前線上の守備パトロール隊がドイツ軍の爆撃機と護衛機を妨害し、撃退した。 *RFC:Royal Flying Corps(直訳は「王立英国航空軍団」)。 >German 4th Army Despite difficulties at the extremities of the attack front, by mid-morning most British objectives had been gained and consolidated. The Germans launched several counter-attacks, with the Eingreif divisions supported by the equivalent of ten normal divisional artilleries. Clearing weather assisted early observation of the German counter-attacks, most of which were repulsed by accurate and heavy artillery and small-arms fire, causing many German casualties. ⇒ドイツ軍第4方面軍 攻撃前線の難局面での困難にもかかわらず、朝方過ぎまでにはほとんどの英国軍の標的が得られて、強化された。ドイツ軍は、通常の師団砲兵隊の10個相当によって支援されたアイングリーフ師団をもって、幾つかの反撃を開始した。晴れ上がった天候が、ドイツ軍反撃隊を早期に観察する助けとなって、正確な重砲と小形火器によって反撃隊の多くが追い返され、多くのドイツ軍の死傷者数を引き起こされた。 >At Zonnebeke a local counter-attack by the 34th Fusilier Regiment (3rd Reserve Division) was attempted around 6:45 a.m., with part of the 2nd battalion (in support) advancing to reinforce the 3rd Battalion holding the front line and the reserve battalion (1st) joining the counter-attack, after advancing west over Broodseinde ridge. The order reached the troops south of the Ypres–Roulers railway quickly, who attacked immediately. ⇒ゾンネベーケでは、第34フュージリア(火打ち石銃兵)連隊(第3予備師団)によって、局地の反撃が午前6時45分ごろに試みられた。支援隊の第2大隊の一部とともに進軍して、前線を保持している第3大隊と、ブロードサインデ尾根の西に進んだ後に反撃に参加する(第1)予備大隊とを補強した。反撃団は、急いでイープル-ルレルス鉄道南の軍隊と接触し、直ちに攻撃した。 >The companies south of Zonnebeke advanced and were overrun by British troops on the Grote Molen spur and taken prisoner. Closer to the railway, troops reached the lake near Zonnebeke church and were pinned down by a British machine-gun already dug-in nearby. The counter-attack order was delayed north of the railway and the counter-attack there did not begin until the 1st Battalion (in reserve) arrived. ⇒ゾンネベーケ南の中隊は進軍したが、グロート・モレン山脚で英国軍によって制圧され、囚人にとられた。最寄の鉄道で数個隊がゾンネベーケ教会近くの湖に到着したが、すでにその周辺に塹壕を掘っていた英国軍の機関銃掃射によって、くぎ付けにされた。反撃団は鉄道での北上が遅れたので、そこで反撃は第1大隊(予備軍)が到着するまで始まらなかった。 >The battalion was able to descend the slope from Broodseinde covered by mist and smoke, which led to few losses but some units losing direction. The British barrage near the village caused many casualties but the survivors pressed on through it and at 7:30 a.m. reached the remnants of the 3rd Battalion near the level crossing north of the village, just in time to hold off a renewed British attack 200 yd (180 m) short of their position, as stray German troops trickled in.* ⇒大隊は、霧や煙にまぎれてブロードサインデから斜面を下ることができて、ほとんど損失はなかったが、方向を見失う部隊もあった。村近くにおける英国軍の集中砲火が多くの死傷者数を引き起こしたが、生存者は進軍を急ぎ、午前7時30分に村の北につながる平地の近くで第3大隊の生き残り兵と接触した。まさにその時、彼らの200ヤード(180m)手前から新たな英国軍の攻撃があったが、道に迷ってボツボツやって来たドイツ兵らがそれを阻止した。* *この最後の1文は、構文と意味がよく分かりません。多分に推測交じりで訳しましたので、誤訳かも知れませんが、その節はどうか悪しからず。

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