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The objective was commanded by the higher ground on the south bank and it was not until the 50th Division captured the rise on the south side of the Cojeul that the village was taken. Several determined German counter-attacks were made and by the morning of 24 April, the British held Guémappe, Gavrelle and the high ground overlooking Fontaine-lez-Croisilles and Cherisy; the fighting around Roeux was indecisive. The principal objective of the attack was the need to sustain a supporting action tying down German reserves to assist the French offensive against the plateau north of the Aisne traversed by the Chemin des Dames. Haig reported, With a view to economising my troops, my objectives were shallow, and for a like reason, and also in order to give the appearance of an attack on a more imposing scale, demonstrations were continued southwards to the Arras-Cambrai Road and northwards to the Souchez River. — Haig At 04:25 on April 28, British and Canadian troops launched the main attack on a front of about eight miles north of Monchy-le-Preux. The battle continued for most of 28 and 29 April, with the Germans delivering determined counter-attacks.

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>The objective was commanded by the higher ground on the south bank and it was not until the 50th Division captured the rise on the south side of the Cojeul that the village was taken. Several determined German counter-attacks were made and by the morning of 24 April, the British held Guémappe, Gavrelle and the high ground overlooking Fontaine-lez-Croisilles and Cherisy; the fighting around Roeux was indecisive. ⇒コジュル川南岸の高地のおかげでそこから標的は見渡せていたが、第50師団が川の南側にある上り坂を攻略してからようやく村が占領された。断固としたドイツ軍の反撃が数回なされて、4月24日の朝までに、英国軍はゲマップ、ガヴレーユ、およびよく見渡しのきくフォンテーン‐レ‐クロワズィユとチェリスィを掌握した。(しかし)ロー周辺の戦いは、一進一退であった。 >The principal objective of the attack was the need to sustain a supporting action tying down German reserves to assist the French offensive against the plateau north of the Aisne traversed by the Chemin des Dames. Haig reported, ⇒攻撃の主要な標的は、シェマン・デ・ダムが周回するエーンの台地北に対するフランス軍の攻撃を援助することで、ドイツ予備軍を拘束する支持行動を続ける必要があった。ヘイグは次のように報告した、 >With a view to economising my troops, my objectives were shallow, and for a like reason, and also in order to give the appearance of an attack on a more imposing scale, demonstrations were continued southwards to the Arras-Cambrai Road and northwards to the Souchez River.* — Haig ⇒わが軍隊を経済的に動かすつもりでしたが、標的(の選択)は浅薄でしたので、その正当性の証しになりそうなものを求め、あるいはまた、より際立つ規模の攻撃を現出するために、実証行動が南のアラス-キャンブレ道や、北のスーシェ川の方へ向って続けられました。* —  ヘイグ *この部分、内容も訳もよく分かりません。誤訳の節はどうぞ悪しからず。 >At 04:25 on April 28, British and Canadian troops launched the main attack on a front of about eight miles north of Monchy-le-Preux. The battle continued for most of 28 and 29 April, with the Germans delivering determined counter-attacks. ⇒4月28日4時25分、英国軍とカナダ軍隊は、モンシー‐ル‐プルーの北8マイルほどの前線に対する主要攻撃を開始した。ドイツ軍が断固とした反撃を行ったので、戦いは4月28日・29日の間ほとんどずっと続いた。

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