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The 6th Army attacked with the XIV, VII, XIII and XIX corps, intending to break through the Allied defences from Arras to La Bassée and Armentières. German infantry advanced in rushes of men in skirmish lines, covered by machine-gun fire. To the south of the 18th Brigade, a battalion of the 16th Brigade had dug in east of Radinghem while the other three dug a reserve line from Bois Blancs to Le Quesne, La Houssoie and Rue du Bois, half way to Bois Grenier. A German attack by the 51st Infantry Brigade at 1:00 p.m. was repulsed but the battalion fell back to the eastern edge of the village, when the German attack further north at Ennetières succeeded. The main German attack was towards a salient at Ennetières held by the 18th Brigade, in disconnected positions held by advanced guards, ready for a resumption of the British advance. The brigade held a front of about 3 mi (4.8 km) with three battalions and was attacked on the right flank where the villages of Ennetières and La Vallée merged. The German attack was repulsed by small-arms fire and little ground was gained by the Germans, who were attacking across open country with little cover. Another attack was made on Ennetières at 1:00 p.m. and repulsed but on the extreme right of the brigade, five platoons were spread across 1,500 yd (1,400 m) to the junction with the 16th Brigade. The platoons had good observation to their fronts but were not in view of each other and in a drizzle of rain, the Germans attacked again at 3:00 p.m. The German attack was repulsed with reinforcements and German artillery began a bombardment of the Brigade positions from the north-east until dark, then sent about three battalions of the 52nd Infantry Brigade of the 25th Reserve Division forward in the dark, to rush the British positions. The German attack broke through and two companies of Reserve Infantry Regiment 125 entered Ennetières from the west; four companies of Reserve Infantry Regiment 122 and a battalion of Reserve Infantry Regiment 125 broke in from the south and the British platoons were surrounded and captured. Another attack from the east, led to the British infantry east of the village retiring to the west side of the village, where they were surprised and captured by German troops advancing from La Vallée, which had fallen after 6:00 p.m. and who had been thought to be British reinforcements; some of the surrounded troops fought on until 5:15 a.m. next morning. The German infantry did not exploit the success and British troops on the northern flank were able to withdraw to a line 1 mi (1.6 km) west of Prémesques, between La Vallée and Chateau d'Hancardry.

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>The 6th Army attacked with the XIV, VII, XIII and XIX corps, intending to break through the Allied defences from Arras to La Bassée and Armentières. German infantry advanced in rushes of men in skirmish lines, covered by machine-gun fire. To the south of the 18th Brigade, a battalion of the 16th Brigade had dug in east of Radinghem while the other three dug a reserve line from Bois Blancs to Le Quesne, La Houssoie and Rue du Bois, half way to Bois Grenier. A German attack by the 51st Infantry Brigade at 1:00 p.m. was repulsed but the battalion fell back to the eastern edge of the village, when the German attack further north at Ennetières succeeded. ⇒第6方面軍は、アラスからラ・バセおよびアルマンティエールまでの連合国軍の防御網を突破することを意図して、第XIV、第VII、第XIII、第XIX軍団をもって攻撃した。このドイツ軍歩兵隊は、機関銃砲火の援護を受けながら小競り合いの戦線に突入した。第18旅団の南側では、第16旅団の1個大隊がラディンゲムの東に塹壕を掘削し、他の3個大隊はボワ・ブランからラ・ケーヌ、ラ・フソイエ、ルア・デュ・ボワまでと、さらにボワ・グルニエへの途中まで掘削した。午後1時、第51歩兵旅団によるドイツ軍の攻撃は撃退されたが、この(うちの1個)大隊も村の東端まで後退した。ただしその頃、もっと北のエネティエールのドイツ軍攻撃は成功した。 >The main German attack was towards a salient at Ennetières held by the 18th Brigade, in disconnected positions held by advanced guards, ready for a resumption of the British advance. The brigade held a front of about 3 mi (4.8 km) with three battalions and was attacked on the right flank where the villages of Ennetières and La Vallée merged. The German attack was repulsed by small-arms fire and little ground was gained by the Germans, who were attacking across open country with little cover. ⇒主なドイツ軍の攻撃は、第18旅団が保持するエネティエールの突出地に対するもので、それは進軍した警備隊が保持する不連続の陣地であり、英国軍の前進を再開する準備をしているところであった。この旅団は3個大隊をもって3マイル(4.8キロ)の前線を掌握していたが、エネティエール村とラ・ヴァレー村にまたがる(範囲に布陣する)右側面を攻撃された。ドイツ軍の攻撃は小火器砲撃によって撃退されたが、ほとんど援護(射撃)なしで開かれた田園を横切って攻撃したドイツ軍も、ほとんど地面を得られなかった。 >Another attack was made on Ennetières at 1:00 p.m. and repulsed but on the extreme right of the brigade, five platoons were spread across 1,500 yd (1,400 m) to the junction with the 16th Brigade. The platoons had good observation to their fronts but were not in view of each other and in a drizzle of rain, the Germans attacked again at 3:00 p.m. The German attack was repulsed with reinforcements and German artillery began a bombardment of the Brigade positions from the north-east until dark, then sent about three battalions of the 52nd Infantry Brigade of the 25th Reserve Division forward in the dark, to rush the British positions. ⇒午後1時、エネティエールに別の攻撃が行われて押し返されたが、この旅団の最右翼には5個の小隊が1,500ヤード(1,400 m)にわたって第16旅団との交差地点まで広がった。小隊は彼らの前線をよく観察してはいたが、霧雨の中で相手が互いの視界に入らず、ドイツ軍は午後3時に再び攻撃した。ドイツ軍の攻撃は増援隊によって撃退されたが、ドイツ軍の砲兵隊は北東の陣地から旅団(規模)の砲撃を開始して暗くなるまで行い、その後は暗闇の中で第25予備師団、第52歩兵旅団の約3個大隊を派遣して英国軍を急襲した。 >The German attack broke through and two companies of Reserve Infantry Regiment 125 entered Ennetières from the west; four companies of Reserve Infantry Regiment 122 and a battalion of Reserve Infantry Regiment 125 broke in from the south and the British platoons were surrounded and captured. Another attack from the east, led to the British infantry east of the village retiring to the west side of the village, where they were surprised and captured by German troops advancing from La Vallée, which had fallen after 6:00 p.m. and who had been thought to be British reinforcements; some of the surrounded troops fought on until 5:15 a.m. next morning. The German infantry did not exploit the success and British troops on the northern flank were able to withdraw to a line 1 mi (1.6 km) west of Prémesques, between La Vallée and Chateau d'Hancardry. ⇒ドイツ軍の攻撃は(敵軍)突破し、第125予備歩兵連隊の2個中隊が西側からエネティエールに入った。第122予備歩兵連隊の4個中隊と第125予備歩兵連隊の1個大隊が南から侵入したので、英国軍の数個小隊が取り囲まれ、攻略された。東からの別の攻撃が村東の英国軍歩兵隊に達したので、彼らは村の西側に撤退したが、そこでラ・ヴァレーから前進していたドイツ軍に急襲されて攻略され、午後6時過ぎに陥落した。囲まれた部隊の一部は翌朝午前5時15分まで戦ったので、彼らは英国軍の増援隊と考えられていた。ドイツ軍歩兵隊は成功を(それ以上)利用しようとはしなかったので、北側面にいる英国軍は、ラ・ヴァレーとシャトー・ダンカルドリーの間にあるプレムスクから西へ1マイル(1.6キロ)の戦線まで撤退することができた。 ※字面だけを何とか訳しましたが、全体によく分かりません。誤訳の可能性大ですが、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。

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  • 和訳をお願いします。

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  • 英文和訳をお願いします。

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  • 英文を日本語訳して下さい。

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  • 英文を和訳して下さい。

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  • 次の英文を訳して下さい。

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  • 英文を訳して下さい。

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    British artillery fired a preparatory bombardment from Polygon Wood to Langemarck but the German guns concentrated on the Gheluvelt Plateau. The British artillery was hampered by low cloud and rain, which made air observation extremely difficult and shells were wasted on empty gun emplacements. The British 25th Division, 18th Division and the German 54th Division took over by 4 August but the German 52nd Reserve Division was not relieved; both sides was exhausted by 10 August. The 18th Division attacked on the right and some troops quickly reached their objectives but German artillery isolated the infantry around Inverness Copse and Glencorse Wood. German troops counter-attacked several times and by nightfall the copse and all but the north-west corner of Glencorse Wood had been recaptured. The 25th Division on the left flank advanced quickly and reached its objectives by 5:30 a.m., rushing the Germans in Westhoek but snipers and attacks by German aircraft caused an increasing number of casualties. The Germans counter-attacked into the night as the British artillery bombarded German troops in their assembly positions. The appalling weather and costly defeats began a slump in British infantry morale; lack of replacements concerned the German commanders. Plan of attack Ypres area, 1917 The attack was planned as an advance in stages, to keep the infantry well under the protection of the field artillery. II Corps was to reach the green line of 31 July, an advance of about 1,480–1,640 yd (1,350–1,500 m) and form a defensive flank from Stirling Castle to Black Watch Corner. The deeper objective was compensated for by reducing battalion frontages from 383–246 yd (350–225 m) and leap-frogging supporting battalions through an intermediate line, to take the final objective. On the 56th Division front, the final objective was about 550 yd (500 m) into Polygon Wood. On the right, the 53rd brigade was to advance from Stirling Castle, through Inverness Copse to Black Watch Corner, at the south western corner of Polygon Wood, to form a defensive flank to the south.