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The attack was not planned as a breakthrough operation, because Flandern I Stellung, the fourth German defensive position, lay 10,000–12,000 yards (9,100–11,000 m) behind the front line and was not an objective on the first day. The Fifth Army plan was a more ambitious version of the earlier plans devised by Rawlinson and Plumer, which had involved an advance of 1,000–1,750 yards (910–1,600 m) on the first day. Major-General J. Davidson, Director of Operations at GHQ, wrote in a memorandum that there was "ambiguity as to what was meant by a step-by-step attack with limited objectives" and suggested reverting to a 1,750 yards (1,600 m) advance, to increase the concentration of British artillery. Gough stressed the need to plan to exploit an opportunity to take ground left temporarily undefended; this was more likely in the first attack, which would have the benefit of long preparation. After discussions at the end of June, Haig and Plumer, the Second Army commander, endorsed the Fifth Army plan. Battle of Pilckem Ridge The British attack began at 3:50 a.m. on 31 July; the attack was to commence at dawn but a layer of unbroken low cloud, meant that it was still dark when the infantry advanced. The main attack, by II Corps across the Ghelveult Plateau to the south, confronted the principal German defensive concentration of artillery, ground-holding (Stellungsdivisionen) and Eingreif divisions. The attack had most success on the northern flank, in front of XIV Corps and the French First Army. In this section of the front, the Entente forces advanced 2,500–3,000 yards (2,300–2,700 m) to the line of the Steenbeek stream. In the centre, XVIII Corps and XIX Corps pushed forward to the line of the Steenbeek to consolidate and sent fresh troops towards the Green and Red lines on the XIX Corps front, for an advance of about 4,000 yards (3,700 m). Group Ypres counter-attacked the flanks of the British break-in, supported by all available artillery and aircraft around noon.

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>The attack was not planned as a breakthrough operation, because Flandern I Stellung, the fourth German defensive position, lay 10,000–12,000 yards (9,100–11,000 m) behind the front line and was not an objective on the first day. The Fifth Army plan was a more ambitious version of the earlier plans devised by Rawlinson and Plumer, which had involved an advance of 1,000–1,750 yards (910–1,600 m) on the first day. ⇒この攻撃は、標的を完全突破するための作戦行動として予定されたものではなかった。なぜなら、ドイツ軍第4防御陣地のフランドル第I陣地は、最前線の10,000–12,000ヤード(9,100–11,000m)背後に設置されていて、1日目の標的ではなかったからである。第5方面軍の計画は、ローリンソンとプルーマーによって考案された初期の計画より野心的な一案であった。そしてそれには、1日目の1,000–1,750ヤード(910–1,600m)の進軍が盛り込まれていた。 >Major-General J. Davidson, Director of Operations at GHQ, wrote in a memorandum that there was "ambiguity as to what was meant by a step-by-step attack with limited objectives" and suggested reverting to a 1,750 yards (1,600 m) advance, to increase the concentration of British artillery. Gough stressed the need to plan to exploit an opportunity to take ground left temporarily undefended; this was more likely in the first attack, which would have the benefit of long preparation. After discussions at the end of June, Haig and Plumer, the Second Army commander, endorsed the Fifth Army plan. ⇒GHQの作戦行動の管理者J.デーヴィッドソン少将は、「限られた標的に対する段階的な攻撃の意味することに関する曖昧さ」があると覚え書に書いて、英国軍の砲兵隊攻撃の集中度を増すために、1,750ヤード(1,600m)の進軍に戻ることを提案した。ゴフは、一時的に無防備のままになる地面を奪取する機会の利用を計画に入れる必要性を強調した。これは最初の攻撃において可能性が大きく、そこには長い準備の利点がありそうであった。6月末の議論の後、ヘイグと第2方面軍指揮官のプルーマーは、(結局)第5方面軍の計画を支持した。 >Battle of Pilckem Ridge The British attack began at 3:50 a.m. on 31 July; the attack was to commence at dawn but a layer of unbroken low cloud, meant that it was still dark when the infantry advanced. The main attack, by II Corps across the Ghelveult Plateau to the south, confronted the principal German defensive concentration of artillery, ground-holding (Stellungsdivisionen) and Eingreif divisions. The attack had most success on the northern flank, in front of XIV Corps and the French First Army. ⇒「ピルケム・リッジの戦い」 英国軍の攻撃は、7月31日午前3時50分に始まった。攻撃は夜明けに始まることになっていたが、低く垂れ込めた厚い雲の層によって、歩兵連隊が進軍したときはまだ暗かった、ということを意味した。ゲルヴェルト台地を南へ横切る第II軍団による主要攻撃は、砲兵隊、地面保持隊(陣地師団群)、およびアイングリーフ師団群などの主要ドイツ軍防御隊の集中攻撃に直面した。第XIV部隊とフランス第1方面軍の前の北側面で、大部分の攻撃成功があげられた。 >In this section of the front, the Entente forces advanced 2,500–3,000 yards (2,300–2,700 m) to the line of the Steenbeek stream. In the centre, XVIII Corps and XIX Corps pushed forward to the line of the Steenbeek to consolidate and sent fresh troops towards the Green and Red lines on the XIX Corps front, for an advance of about 4,000 yards (3,700 m). Group Ypres counter-attacked the flanks of the British break-in, supported by all available artillery and aircraft around noon. ⇒前線のこの地区の協商国軍は、シュテーンベーク川の戦線で2,500–3,000ヤード(2,300–2,700m)進軍移動した。中央部では、第XVIII部隊と第XIX部隊がシュテーンベーク戦線に突き進んで強化し、およそ4,000ヤード(3,700m)の進軍のために、第XIX部隊前線上の緑と赤(で示された)戦線に向けて新しい軍隊を派遣した。正午ごろ、グループ・イープルは、利用可能な全砲兵隊と航空隊の支援を受けて、英国軍の侵入隊の側面に反撃した。

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  • 英文を日本語訳して下さい。

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