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In the interim, special companies of the Royal Engineers augmented the regular level of harassment by firing a total of 3,500 gas drums and 900 gas shells into Lens by 15 August. The artillery neutralized 40 out of an estimated 102 German batteries in the area by zero hour, partly with the technique of predicted fire for the first time, using datum points and calibrated guns, which greatly improved the accuracy of the artillery. Troops were rotated through the reserve area to conduct training and rehearsals in preparation for the assault. These obvious preliminary actions to an attack did not go unnoticed by the Germans, which made it impossible to conceal the First Army's general intentions or even, as it turned out, the date of the assault. The best that could be done was to attempt to mislead the Germans with respect to time and place. To this end I Corps staged exercises with dummy tanks on 14 August, directly west of Lens. Opposing forces Canadian Corps commander Lieutenant-General Arthur Currie had three attacking divisions, one division in reserve and numerous support units under his command. German 6th Army commander General der Infanterie Otto von Below was responsible for the area between Lille and Cambrai. Hill 70, and the area surrounding it was defended by the ad hoc Gruppe Loos. The defending elements of the German 6th Army consisted of the 7th Division, 4th Guards Division, 185th Division, 11th Reserve Division and 220th Division. Assault on Hill 70 The plan to capture Hill 70 called for the 1st and 2nd Canadian Divisions to attack on a front of 4,000 yards (3,700 m). Their objective was to capture the main enemy defensive positions on the eastern or reverse slope of Hill 70. The objectives were marked off in depth by three stages. In the first stage, the assaulting troops would capture the German front-line trenches. The German second position on the crest of the hill during the second stage and the final stage, marked by the German third line, on the reverse side of the slope, some 1,500 yards (1,400 m) from the starting position.

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>In the interim, special companies of the Royal Engineers augmented the regular level of harassment by firing a total of 3,500 gas drums and 900 gas shells into Lens by 15 August. The artillery neutralized 40 out of an estimated 102 German batteries in the area by zero hour, partly with the technique of predicted fire for the first time, using datum points and calibrated guns, which greatly improved the accuracy of the artillery. ⇒英国陸軍工兵隊の特任中隊が、その(延期の)間の8月15日までにレンスへ合計3,500個のドラム缶ガスと900発の毒ガス弾を発射することによって、妨害の正規レベルを上げた。砲兵隊は、作戦開始までにこの地域で、初めて予測された砲火の技術を部分的に使ってドイツ軍の約102個の砲撃中隊のうちの40個を制圧した。その際、点数化データや照準調整された銃を使ったので、砲撃の精度が大幅に改善された。 >Troops were rotated through the reserve area to conduct training and rehearsals in preparation for the assault. These obvious preliminary actions to an attack did not go unnoticed by the Germans, which made it impossible to conceal the First Army's general intentions or even, as it turned out, the date of the assault. The best that could be done was to attempt to mislead the Germans with respect to time and place. To this end I Corps staged exercises with dummy tanks on 14 August, directly west of Lens. ⇒攻撃に備えて教練と予行演習を行うために、軍隊は予備地域で交替した。攻撃に向けてのこれらの明らかな予備行動はドイツ軍に気づかれずには行かなかった。そして、それは第1方面軍の将軍の意図または、結局のところ、攻撃の日付さえ隠すことを不可能にした。することができた最善手は、時間と場所に関してドイツ軍を誤解させようとすることだった。この演習の終わりに第I軍団は、8月14日に直接レンス西で偽の戦車を使って実践演習を行った。 >Opposing forces Canadian Corps commander Lieutenant-General Arthur Currie had three attacking divisions, one division in reserve and numerous support units under his command. ⇒対抗する軍団 カナダ軍段の指揮官アーサー・カリー中将は、3個の攻撃師団、1個の予備師団、および多数の支援部隊を指揮の傘下に抱えていた。 >German 6th Army commander General der Infanterie Otto von Below was responsible for the area between Lille and Cambrai. Hill 70, and the area surrounding it was defended by the ad hoc Gruppe Loos. The defending elements of the German 6th Army consisted of the 7th Division, 4th Guards Division, 185th Division, 11th Reserve Division and 220th Division. ⇒ドイツ軍第6方面軍の指揮官、オットー・フォン・ベロー歩兵隊将軍は、リールとキャンブレの間の地域に対する責任者であった。70番ヒル、およびその周囲の地域は特別にグラップ(グループ)・ルースによって守られていた。ドイツ第6方面軍の守備部隊は、第7師団、第4警備師団、第185師団、第11予備師団、および第220師団から成っていた。 >Assault on Hill 70 The plan to capture Hill 70 called for the 1st and 2nd Canadian Divisions to attack on a front of 4,000 yards (3,700 m). Their objective was to capture the main enemy defensive positions on the eastern or reverse slope of Hill 70. The objectives were marked off in depth by three stages. In the first stage, the assaulting troops would capture the German front-line trenches. The German second position on the crest of the hill during the second stage and the final stage, marked by the German third line, on the reverse side of the slope, some 1,500 yards (1,400 m) from the starting position. ⇒70番ヒルの襲撃 70番ヒルの攻略計画は、4000ヤード(3,700m)の前線攻撃用にカナダ軍の第1、第2方面軍に召集をかけた。その目的は、70番ヒルの東傾斜、すなわち、逆傾斜面上の敵の防御陣地を攻略することだった。目的は(また)、深度別に3つの段階に区分けされた。襲撃軍隊は、第1段階ではドイツ軍の最前線塹壕を、第2および最終段階の間では、開始位置から約1,500ヤード(1,400m)の、逆傾斜面上のドイツ軍第3戦線によって画される丘の頂上にあるドイツ軍第2陣地を攻略するものとした。

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