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長文の訳お願いします

Fortunately, we know who made this term and the occasion upon which he first used it. Noah Webster, the famous dictionary maker, coined demoralize. Although he spent fifty years of his life studying words and defining them in dictionaries, this is the only one he ever made. In 1794 he wrote about the French Revolution, and in this he emphasized the bad effects of war, especially civil war, on the morals of the people involved. He referred to these effects as demoralizing. Webster knew he had added a word to the language. He watched to see if others would adopt it, and was pleased to see that the term soon became popular. Before he died in 1843 he knew demoralize had become firmly established in the language. His word has had an unusual thing happen to it. As soon as people began to notice the term, some of them supposed Webster had borrowed it form the French word demoraliser, but in a dictionary he brought out in 1828 Webster explained he had made it by placing the common prefix de on moralize or moral. And this explanation he stuck to as long as he lived. Not long after his death, however, his word was explained as being derived from French, and some dictionaries still give this explanation of it. How does your dictionary say demoralize originated?

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Fortunately, we know who made this term and the occasion upon which he first used it. Noah Webster, the famous dictionary maker, coined demoralize. 幸いなことに我々は誰が最初にどのような状況でその用語を作ったかを知っている。有名な辞書メーカー Noah Webster が demoralize という言葉を造った。 Although he spent fifty years of his life studying words and defining them in dictionaries, this is the only one he ever made. 彼は50年間も言葉を研究し定義していたが、言葉を造ったのはこれが最初で最後であった。 In 1794 he wrote about the French Revolution, and in this he emphasized the bad effects of war, especially civil war, on the morals of the people involved. He referred to these effects as demoralizing. 1974年に彼はフランス革命について書いた。その中で彼は戦争、特に内戦が人々のモラルに悪影響を及ぼすことを強調した。そのような影響を彼は demoralizing と呼んだ。 Webster knew he had added a word to the language. He watched to see if others would adopt it, and was pleased to see that the term soon became popular. Webster は英語に一つ新語を加えたことを認識していた。彼はその語が人々に受け入れられるか観察し、間もなくポピュラーになったことを知って喜んだ。 Before he died in 1843 he knew demoralize had become firmly established in the language. 彼が1843年に亡くなる前に、彼は demoralize という語が英語にしっかり定着したことを知っていた。 His word has had an unusual thing happen to it. 彼の語にまれなことが起こった。 As soon as people began to notice the term, some of them supposed Webster had borrowed it form the French word demoraliser, but in a dictionary he brought out in 1828 Webster explained he had made it by placing the common prefix de on moralize or moral. この用語に気づいた人々はすぐにWebster がフランス語の demoraliser という語を借りたのだと考えた。しかし1828年に Webster が世に送り出した辞書には、moralize または moral に接頭語の de を付けて彼が造ったものと説明している。 And this explanation he stuck to as long as he lived. 彼は生きている間ずっとこの説明に固執した。 Not long after his death, however, his word was explained as being derived from French, and some dictionaries still give this explanation of it. How does your dictionary say demoralize originated? しかしながら、彼の死後間もなく、彼の語はフランス語から来たものと説明されるようになり、いくつかの辞書には今もそのように説明されている。あなたの辞書には demoralize の語源は何と書かれていますか?

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    纏めれば     demoralize は、ウェブスターは自分が作ったと言うが、似た語がフランス語にある、あなたの辞書には語源は何と書いてありますか?    と言うことです。

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