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英文の和訳をお願いします。

Americans are having a passionate love affair with something they cannot see, hear, feel, touch or taste. That something is calories, billions upon billions of which are consumed every day, often unwittingly, at and between meals. Certainly calories are talked about constantly, and information about them appears with increasing frequency on food labels, menus, recipes and Web sites. But few people understand what they are and how they work - especially how they have worked to create a population in which 64 percent of adults and a third of children are overweight or obese, or how they thwart the efforts of so many people to shed those unwanted pounds and keep them off once and for all. Enter two experts: Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University; and Malden Nesheim, professor emeritus of nutritional sciences at Cornell University. Together they have written a new book, "Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics," to be published April 1, which explains what calories are, where they come from, how different sources affect the body, and why it is so easy to consume more of them than most people need to achieve and maintain a healthy weight.

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  • sayshe
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アメリカ人は、彼らには、見たり、聞いたり、触ったり、味わったりできないあるものに情熱的な愛着を抱いています。そのあるものとは、カロリーです、数十億と言う途方もないカロリーが、気付かれないまま食事中や食間に毎日消費されています。 確かに、カロリーは常に話題に上ります、そして、カロリーについての情報は、ますます頻繁に食品のラベル、メニュー、レシピ、ウェブサイトに登場します。しかし、カロリーが何か、カロリーがどの様な働きをするか理解している人は、ほとんどいません ― とりわけ、人口の中で成人の64パーセント、子供の3分の1が、体重過多や肥満である状況を生み出すのにカロリーがどの様な働きをして来たのか、あるいは、とても多くの人々が、そうした望まない体重を減らし、これを最後に余分な体重を増やさないようにしようとする努力をカロリーがどの様に邪魔しているかを理解している人は、ほとんどいないのです。 2人の専門家に登場してもらいましょう:ニューヨーク大学の栄養、食物学及び公衆衛生学の教授のマリオン・ネスレ氏とコーネル大学の栄養学の名誉教授のモールデン・ネサイム氏です。両氏は、「なぜカロリーは重要なのか:科学から政治へ」と題する新著を4月1日に上梓しましました、この著書で、カロリーとは何か、カロリーはどこから来るのか、様々な原因物質がどの様に身体に影響するのか、ほとんどの人が健康な体重を達成し維持するのに必要とする以上のカロリーを、なぜこれほど簡単に消費してしまうのか解説しています。

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