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16-2日本語訳

お願いします。  What if he offered to help Sikander? If they were on the same side,there would be no battle.Taxila would be safe.What's more,Sikander might even help King Ambhi against his enemy King Porus.  So,when Sikander-whom you might know by his Gredk name,Alexander the Great-and his army marched up to the gates of Taxila,King Ambhi was there to welcome them.Just to make sure that Alexander understood that he,King Ambhi,was a friend,he threw Alexander's army a huge party hat lasted for a whole month.Arrian,a diplomat traveling with Alexander,wrote that when Alexander“arrived at Taxila,a great and flourishing city...Taxiles the governor of the city,and the Indians who belonged to it received him in a friendly manner,and he therefore added as much of the adjacent country to their territory as they requested.”The present that he offered Alexander as a symbol of his good will was just as impressive:5,000 soldiers and 56 war elephants.  These elephants and local troops would be important to provide backup for Alexander's elite corps of around 5,000 armored cavalry(men on horseback),14,500 archers,5,300 regular cavalry,and around 15,000 foot soldiers.Although his troops were brave,experienced,and skillful,Alexander knew that defeating Porus would be difficult. Porus had a large army of his own-3,000 cavalry and mnre than 1,000 chariots,50,000 font soldiers and archers,and 200 war elephants.His soldiers were also supposed to be the tallest and most powerful warriors in Asia,with an average height of more than six feet.They looked even taller because they wore their long hair coiled on their heads and wrapped in turbans so thick that even the sharpest sword could not cut through them.They were dressed in white cotton and white leather shoes,and wore earrings set with precious stones,golden armbands,and bracelets even into battle.

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 彼がシカンダールを助けると申し出るならば、どうでしょう? 彼らが味方に着くならば、戦いはないでしょう。 タキシラは安全です。 その上、シカンダールはアムビヒ王の敵のポーラス王に対してアムビヒ王を助けさえするかもしれません。  それで、シカンダール ― あなた方は彼のギリシア名、アレキサンダー大王で、彼を知っているかもしれません ― と彼の軍がタキシラの入口まで進軍してきたとき、アムビヒ王は彼らを歓迎するためにそこにいました。 アレキサンダーが、彼、すなわち、アムビヒ王が友人であると理解したことを確認するために、彼はアレキサンダーの軍にまる1ヵ月間続く盛大な宴を開きました。アレキサンダーと共に旅する外交官、アリアヌスは、次の様に書き記しました、アレキサンダーが、大きくて繁栄する街、タキシラに到着したとき、 ... その街の統治者タキシルス(アムビヒ王と思われる)とその部下のインド人達は、友好的に彼を迎え、そして、彼らが要求した通り、彼はその隣国さえも彼らの領土に加えました。彼が善意の印にアレキサンダーに提供した贈り物は、とにかく印象的でした: 5,000人の兵士と56頭の戦闘用の象だったのです。  これらの象と地元の軍隊は、アレキサンダーの精鋭部隊:約5,000人の機甲騎兵隊(馬に乗った兵士)、14,500人の弓術兵、5,300人の正規騎兵隊、約15,000人の歩兵に援軍を提供するのに重要となるでしょう。 彼の軍隊は、勇敢で、経験があり、戦闘技術に長けていたけれど、アレキサンダーはポーラスを打ち破ることが困難だということを知っていました。ポーラスには、彼自身の大きな軍 ― 3,000人の騎兵隊、1,000台以上の二輪戦車、50,000人の歩兵、弓術兵、200頭の戦闘用の象 ― がありました。 彼の兵士は、また、6フィート以上の平均身長を持つ、アジアで最も背が高くて最も強力な戦士であると思われていました。彼らは、一層、背が高く見えました、と言うのは、彼らはその長い髪を頭上で巻いて、とても分厚くターバンで包んでいたので、最も鋭い剣さえそれらを切り通せなかったのです。彼らは白い木綿の服に身を包み、白い革の靴を履き、戦いに際してさえ高価な宝石をはめ込んだ耳飾り、金色の腕章や腕輪を身につけていました。

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  • 16-3日本語訳

    お願いします。  At first,King Ambhi's plan seemed to have worked.Alexander marched on,leaving Taxila intact.When he got to the Jhelum River,the border between King Ambhi and Porus,Alexander demanded that Porus surrender at once.Porus,safe on the other side,refused.It was too hot to fight,and the river,rising from melting snow,was too dangerous to cross.At this time of the year,there was no grass for the army's horses and oxen,and villagers had no rice or wheat to spare for soldiers.Besides,the monsoon was expected soon,and no sensible person would try fighting during the huge rainstorms that were on their way.It was pointless.Once it started raining,everything was so muddy that horses and chariots got stuck and were useless.Only the elephants could get through,and even they wouldn't be much help.The archers the elephants carried would have ahard time shooting with wet,soggy bow strings.  But Alexander had not come as far as he had to be stopped by a river or a little rain.He sent small bands of men out at night to trick Porus into thinking he was crossing the river.According to one story,Porus sent his troops to meet them,only to find out that no one was there.When Alexander and his men finally did attack,during a heavy rainstorm,the battle lasted for more than eight hourr.Thousands of warriors(including both of Porus's sons)were kilked or wounded,along with their horses and elephants.Porus himself was badly wounded,too.But he was just as stubborn as Alexander and,wounded or not,he led a charge against the Greeks.  By the end of the day,both armies were exhausted,and Alexander called a truce.According to a Persian poem,Shah Nama,written by the poet Firdausi 1,600 years later,Alexander told Porus:

  • 16-4日本語訳

    お願いします。  O!Noble Man:  Our two hosts have been shattered by the fight,  The wild beasts batten on the brains of men,  The horses' hoofs are trampling on their bones,  Now both of us are heroes,brave and young,  Both paladins of eloquence and brain,  Why the slaughter be the soldier's lot  Or bare survival after combating. Alexander's first messenger war poor unlucky King Ambhi,but Porus chased that traitor away with a spear,so Alexander sent someone else.This time,after Porus had dirmounted from his horse and had a drink of water,he agreed to meet with Alexander.Although Greek historian Arrian said that Alexander won,he also said that when Alexander asked Porus how he wanted to be treated,Porus answered,“as a King. Many historians today believe that the battle ended in a tie.Alexander granted Porus not only the land that was already his,but a good part of King Ambhi's land as well.  Although Alexander was ready to go farther,after the battle with Porus his Greek soldiers had had enough,and they refused.Their return was horrible.After fighting their way down through unfriendly India settlements along the Indus River to the sea,most of the army died while trying to make its way home along the treacherous and waterless Makran coast between India and Mesopotamia.Although Alexander himself got to Mesopotamia safely,he died there a few years later,when he was only 32 years old.  From an Indian point of view,the invasion of Alexander the Great was far less important than the adventures of one of King Porus's allies,a minor prince named Chandragupta.The story goes that Alexander thought that Chandragupta was not respectful enough to him and tried to have him killed,but Chandragupta ran away.By 317 BCE,the prince who ran in fear of his life would control half of the Indian subcontinent,everything from present-day Afghanistan to Bangladesh and Nepal to the central Deccan plateau-including all of the South Asian territory once held by Alexander,Porus,and Ambhi.

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  • 16-5日本語訳

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  • 日本語訳を!!

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  • 日本語訳を!!12

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  • 日本語訳を!!

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