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Despite these losses the majority of the Ottoman armies had managed to withdraw relativity in one piece, but they had been split with no way for one to support the other if or when they were attacked. Further the Ottoman Seventh Army on the British right was cut off from the Palestinian rail network and all their supplies would have to be brought in by road. In preparation for the attack, against Jerusalem, the ANZAC Mounted Division and the 54th (East Anglian) Division, would form a defensive line on the coastal plain, while the XXI Corps moved into the Judaean Mountains. Instead of a direct assault on Jerusalem, Allenby planned to first cut off the city from their supply routes in the north. The plan was for two infantry division, the 75th Division on the left, the 52nd (Lowland) Division in the centre, with the horsemen from the Yeomanry Mounted Division on the right, to move on Jerusalem with the 75th using the main Jaffa–Jerusalem road. The two outer division's would circle around Jerusalem meeting at Bireh 10 miles (16 km) to the north of the city. In the way of the 75th Division was the village of Nebi Samwil also known as the "Tomb of Samuel", the traditional burial site for the biblical prophet Samuel. Nebi Samwil rests at the top of a hill 2,979 feet (908 m) above sea level, 3.1 miles (5.0 km) to the north of Jerusalem. From the village observers can see into Jerusalem and it controls the road from the coast to the west and the road from Samaria to the north into the city. The village was part of the Ottoman defences in front of Jerusalem and its capture was considered vital, to the eventual capture of the city. The attack began on 18 November, with the Australian Mounted Division clearing Latron, which was in the way of the 75th Division. The next day the Yeomanry Mounted Division with the furthest to go moved off first. Followed by the 52nd (Lowland) Division which departed from Ludd and the 75th Division from Latron. The two other divisions travelling astride nothing more than tracks, found it more difficult and their vehicles and heavy weapons had to turn back. The advance also coincided with the start of the winter rains, which not only affected the terrain, but also caused problems for the troops, who were only equipped for a desert war and lacked any winter clothing.

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>Despite these losses the majority of the Ottoman armies had managed to withdraw relativity in one piece, but they had been split with no way for one to support the other if or when they were attacked. Further the Ottoman Seventh Army on the British right was cut off from the Palestinian rail network and all their supplies would have to be brought in by road. In preparation for the attack, against Jerusalem, the ANZAC Mounted Division and the 54th (East Anglian) Division, would form a defensive line on the coastal plain, while the XXI Corps moved into the Judaean Mountains. ⇒これらの損失にもかかわらず、オスマントルコ方面軍の大多数は何とか関係者がひと塊になって退却したものの、彼らが攻撃された時はお互いに支持し合う術もなくバラバラに分裂していた。さらに、英国軍右翼側のオスマントルコ軍第7方面軍は、パレスチナの鉄道網から切り離されて、彼らの供給品はすべて陸路で運び込まなければならなくなった。アンザック騎馬師団および第54(東アングル)師団は、エルサレムに対する攻撃の準備で、沿岸の平地に防御戦線を組み立てる一方、第XXI軍団はユダヤ山系へ移動した。 >Instead of a direct assault on Jerusalem, Allenby planned to first cut off the city from their supply routes in the north. The plan was for two infantry division, the 75th Division on the left, the 52nd (Lowland) Division in the centre, with the horsemen from the Yeomanry Mounted Division on the right, to move on Jerusalem with the 75th using the main Jaffa–Jerusalem road. The two outer division's would circle around Jerusalem meeting at Bireh 10 miles (16 km) to the north of the city. ⇒アレンビーは、エルサレムへの直接的な猛攻撃の代わりに、最初町の北側で供給ルートから都市を切り離すことを計画した。その計画は、歩兵2個師団用に、すなわち、左翼の第75師団、中央部の第52(ローランド)師団用と、ヤッファ-エルサレム主要路を使って第75師団とともに動くために右翼のヨーマンリー騎馬師団から来る騎手用に作られた。より外側の2個師団の騎馬隊がエルサレムを包囲し、都市の北10マイル(16キロ)のビレフで会戦することになっていた。 >In the way of the 75th Division was the village of Nebi Samwil also known as the "Tomb of Samuel", the traditional burial site for the biblical prophet Samuel. Nebi Samwil rests at the top of a hill 2,979 feet (908 m) above sea level, 3.1 miles (5.0 km) to the north of Jerusalem. From the village observers can see into Jerusalem and it controls the road from the coast to the west and the road from Samaria to the north into the city. The village was part of the Ottoman defences in front of Jerusalem and its capture was considered vital, to the eventual capture of the city. ⇒第75師団の行軍途上に、「サミュエルの墓」としても知られる、聖書の予言者サミュエルのための伝統的埋葬地であるネビ・サムウィルの村があった。ネビ・サムウィルは、エルサレムの北3.1マイル(5キロ)の、海抜2,979フィート(908m)の丘の頂上にある。村の眺望台からエルサレムを見ることができて、それは沿岸から西へ行く道路とサマリアから北の都市に入る道路を見下ろしている。村はエルサレムの前のオスマントルコ軍の防御施設の一部であり、それを攻略することが最終の都市部攻略に必須であると考えられた。 >The attack began on 18 November, with the Australian Mounted Division clearing Latron, which was in the way of the 75th Division. The next day the Yeomanry Mounted Division with the furthest to go moved off first. Followed by the 52nd (Lowland) Division which departed from Ludd and the 75th Division from Latron. The two other divisions travelling astride nothing more than tracks, found it more difficult and their vehicles and heavy weapons had to turn back. The advance also coincided with the start of the winter rains, which not only affected the terrain, but also caused problems for the troops, who were only equipped for a desert war and lacked any winter clothing. ⇒攻撃は、第75師団の行軍途上にあるラトロンを、オーストラリア騎馬師団が一掃する攻撃をもって、11月18日に始まった。その翌日、まずヨーマンリー騎馬師団が最も遠くまで動いた。それに続いて、第52(ローランド)師団がラッドを発ち、第75師団がラトロンを発った。行軍用にトラックしか持たない他の2個師団は、行進は困難で、彼らの乗り物と重火器は引き返さざるを得ないことが分かった。その進軍はまた、冬の雨の開始時期と重なったので、それが地形に影響したのみならず、軍隊にとっての問題も引き起こした。というのも、彼らは砂漠での戦いの装備しかなく、いかなる冬用衣類も持たなかったからである。

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