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The Battle of Behobeho was fought during the East African Campaign of World War I.After capturing the coastal capital of German East Africa, Dar es Salaam in September 1916, General Jan Smuts ordered his army's advance to halt due to a malaria pandemic that had devastated the soldiers. Shortly after the new year, the 25th Frontiersmen Battalion, led by famous hunter and explorer, Captain Frederick Selous advanced into the interior of the colony, up the Rufiji River. On January 3 British scouts ahead of the battalion reported a column of German soldiers moving down the road. A skirmish ensued. A German marksman reportedly killed Captain Frederick Selous during the battle. It is said that because of his fame Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck, commander of the German forces in German East Africa at the time sent a letter of condolence to the British after his death.

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>The Battle of Behobeho was fought during the East African Campaign of World War I.After capturing the coastal capital of German East Africa, Dar es Salaam in September 1916, General Jan Smuts ordered his army's advance to halt due to a malaria pandemic that had devastated the soldiers. Shortly after the new year, the 25th Frontiersmen Battalion, led by famous hunter and explorer, Captain Frederick Selous advanced into the interior of the colony, up the Rufiji River. ⇒「バホベブの戦い」は、第一次世界大戦の「東アフリカ野戦」中の戦いであった。1916年9月、ドイツ領東アフリカの沿岸の中心地ダル・エス・サラームを占領したあと、ジャン・スマッツ将軍はマラリアの世界的流行のため軍の進軍を止めるよう命じたところ、兵士らは驚愕し荒んだ。新年直後に、第25辺境地大隊が有名なハンターで探検家のフレデリック・セルース大尉の指揮下にルフィジ川を遡って植民地の内部へ進軍した。 >On January 3 British scouts ahead of the battalion reported a column of German soldiers moving down the road. A skirmish ensued. A German marksman reportedly killed Captain Frederick Selous during the battle. It is said that because of his fame Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck, commander of the German forces in German East Africa at the time sent a letter of condolence to the British after his death. ⇒1月3日、大隊より前に英国の偵察兵が、道に沿って動いているドイツ軍の兵士の縦隊を報告した。衝突が起こった。伝えられるところでは、その戦いの間にドイツ軍の狙撃兵によってフレデリック・セルース大尉が射殺された。そこで、彼の名声のために、ドイツ領東アフリカのドイツ軍隊指揮官のポール・エミール・フォン・レトウ‐フォルベックは、彼(大尉)の死後英国軍に哀悼のことばを送ったと言われている。

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