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Aftermath The battle penetrated a majority of the defenses of the Hindenburg Line and allowed the next attack (the Battle of Cambrai (1918)) to complete the penetration and begin the advance beyond the Hindenburg Line. Twelve Victoria Crosses, the highest military decoration for valour awarded to British and Commonwealth forces, were awarded for actions during the battle; • Acting Lieutenant-Colonel John Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort of the 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. • Captain John MacGregor, 2nd Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles. • Captain Cyril Hubert Frisby, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. • Lieutenant Graham Thomson Lyall, 102nd (North British Columbia) Battalion, CEF. • Lieutenant Samuel Lewis Honey, 78th Battalion (Winnipeg Grenadiers), CEF. • Lieutenant George Fraser Kerr, 3rd Battalion (Toronto Regiment), CEF. • Lieutenant Milton Fowler Gregg, Royal Canadian Regiment. • Sergeant William Merrifield, 4th (Central Ontario) Battalion, CEF. • Sergeant Frederick Charles Riggs, 6th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment. • Corporal Thomas Neely, 8th Battalion, The King's Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster). • Lance-Corporal Thomas Norman Jackson, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. • Private Henry Tandey, 5th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding). Commemoration The Canadian participation in the Battle of the Canal du Nord is commemorated at the Canadian Bourlon Wood Memorial, located southeast of the town of Bourlon. The memorial is located on high ground beside the Bourlon Woods, giving a view of the town. The Fifth Battle of Ypres, also called the Advance of Flanders and the Battle of the Peaks of Flanders (French: Bataille des Crêtes de Flandres) is an informal name used to identify a series of battles in northern France and southern Belgium from late September through October 1918. After the German Spring Offensive of 1918 was stopped, German morale waned and the increasing numbers of American soldiers arriving on the Western Front gave the Allies a growing advantage over the German forces. To take advantage of this Marshal Ferdinand Foch developed a strategy which became known as the Grand Offensive in which attacks were made on the German lines over as wide a front as possible. Belgian, British and French forces around the Ypres Salient were to form the northern pincer of an offensive towards the Belgian city of Liège.

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>Aftermath  The battle penetrated a majority of the defenses of the Hindenburg Line and allowed the next attack (the Battle of Cambrai (1918)) to complete the penetration and begin the advance beyond the Hindenburg Line. ⇒余波  この戦闘でヒンデンブルク戦線防御帯の大部分に突入し、次の攻撃(「カンブレの戦い」〈1918年〉)で侵入が完了したことによってヒンデンブルク戦線を越えて進軍を始めることができるようになった。 >Twelve Victoria Crosses, the highest military decoration for valour awarded to British and Commonwealth forces, were awarded for actions during the battle; •Acting Lieutenant-Colonel John Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort of the 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. •Captain John MacGregor, 2nd Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles. ⇒英国および英連邦軍団に与えられた最高の軍事勲章である12個のビクトリア十字軍が、戦闘中の勇敢な行動に対して授与された。 •近衛歩兵連隊、第1大隊の第6ゴート子爵隊、ジョン・ビレカー代理中佐。 •カナダ軍騎馬ライフル隊、第2大隊、ジョン・マクグレガー大尉。 >•Captain Cyril Hubert Frisby, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. •Lieutenant Graham Thomson Lyall, 102nd (North British Columbia) Battalion, CEF. •Lieutenant Samuel Lewis Honey, 78th Battalion (Winnipeg Grenadiers), CEF. •Lieutenant George Fraser Kerr, 3rd Battalion (Toronto Regiment), CEF. •Lieutenant Milton Fowler Gregg, Royal Canadian Regiment. ⇒•コールドストリーム護衛隊、第1大隊、サイリル・ハバート・フリスビー大尉。 • CEF(中央英国軍)、第102(北ブリティッシュ・コロンビア)大隊、グラハム・トムソン・ライアル中尉。 • CEF、第78大隊(ウィニペグ榴弾隊)、サミュエル・レーウィス・ホーニー中尉。 • CEF、第3大隊(トロント連隊)、ジョージ・フレイザー・カー中尉。 •王立カナダ軍連隊、ミルトン・ファウラー・グレッグ中尉。 •Sergeant William Merrifield, 4th (Central Ontario) Battalion, CEF. •Sergeant Frederick Charles Riggs, 6th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment. •Corporal Thomas Neely, 8th Battalion, The King's Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster). •Lance-Corporal Thomas Norman Jackson, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards. •Private Henry Tandey, 5th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding). • CEF、第4(中央オンタリオ)大隊、ウィリアム・メリフィールド軍曹。 •ヨーク、ランカスター連隊、第6大隊、フレデリック・チャールズ・リッグス軍曹。 •王有王立連隊(ランカスター隊)、第8大隊、トーマス・ネリー曹長。 •コールドストリーム衛兵隊、第1大隊、トーマス・ノーマン・ジャクソン伍長。 •ウェリントン大公(西ライディング)連隊、第5大隊、ヘンリー・タンディ兵卒。 >Commemoration  The Canadian participation in the Battle of the Canal du Nord is commemorated at the Canadian Bourlon Wood Memorial, located southeast of the town of Bourlon. The memorial is located on high ground beside the Bourlon Woods, giving a view of the town. ⇒記念  「カナル・デュ・ノールの戦い」でのカナダ軍の参戦が、ブーロンの町の南東に位置するブーロン・ウッドで記念された。記念碑はブーロン・ウッドの横にある高台にあり、(そこから)街を一望することができる。 >The Fifth Battle of Ypres, also called the Advance of Flanders and the Battle of the Peaks of Flanders (French: Bataille des Crêtes de Flandres) is an informal name used to identify a series of battles in northern France and southern Belgium from late September through October 1918. After the German Spring Offensive of 1918 was stopped, German morale waned and the increasing numbers of American soldiers arriving on the Western Front gave the Allies a growing advantage over the German forces. To take advantage of this Marshal Ferdinand Foch developed a strategy which became known as the Grand Offensive in which attacks were made on the German lines over as wide a front as possible. Belgian, British and French forces around the Ypres Salient were to form the northern pincer of an offensive towards the Belgian city of Liège. ⇒「フランドルの進軍」・「フランドルの峰上の戦い」とも呼ばれる「第5次イープルの戦い」は、1918年9月末から10月にかけてフランス北部とベルギー南部で行われた一連の戦闘を識別するために使われる非公式の名前である。1918年のドイツ軍の「春攻勢」が止まった後、ドイツ軍の士気が低下し、西部戦線に到着するアメリカ軍の兵士が増えたことで、連合国軍はドイツ軍よりも有利になった。このフェルディナン・フォシュ元帥(計画)を生かすために、「グランド攻勢」として知られるようになる戦略が策定された。この攻撃では、できる限り広域のドイツ軍戦線が攻撃対象とされた。イープル突出部周辺のベルギー・英国・フランス軍団は、ベルギーのリエージュ市に向かって攻撃の北側を挟み込む体勢をとることとなった。

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  • 日本語訳をお願いいたします。

    The left of the battalion entered the wood further north, took thirty prisoners and occupied part of the eastern edge, as German troops in the wood from I Battalion, Reserve Infantry Regiment 106, II Battalion, Infantry Regiment 182 and III Battalion, Reserve Infantry Regiment 51, skirmished with patrols and received reinforcements from Guillemont. Around noon, more German reinforcements occupied the north end of the wood and at 6:00 p.m., the British artillery fired a barrage between Trônes Wood and Guillemont, after a report from the French of a counter-attack by Reserve Infantry Regiment 106. The attack was cancelled but some German troops managed to get across to the wood to reinforce the garrison, as part of a British battalion advanced from the south, retook the south-eastern edge and dug in.

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    On 8 July, German counter-barrage on the lines of the 36th Brigade west of Ovillers, caused many casualties but at 8:30 a.m., the British attacked behind a creeping barrage and quickly took the first three German trenches. Many prisoners were taken in the German dug-outs, where they had been surprised by the speed of the British advance. The three German battalions lost 1,400 casualties and withdrew to the second German trench behind outposts; Infantry Regiment 186, II Battalion, Guard Fusiliers and Recruit Battalion 180, had many casualties and withdrew into the middle of the village.

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    An attack by a second battalion from the Ginchy–Flers road was also repulsed, the battalions losing 528 men. In the early afternoon a battalion of the 8th Division attacked the north-eastern face of the wood and was also repulsed, after losing all its officers. At 3:00 p.m. on 15 July Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 6 of the 10th Bavarian Division attacked in force from the east but was partially driven back by rifle and machine-gun fire. At 4:40 p.m. Tanner reported to Lukin that German forces were massing to the north of the wood and he called for reinforcements, as the South Africans had already lost a company from the 2nd (Natal and Free State) Battalion.

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    Lukin ordered an attack from the south-west corner of the wood on a battalion front, with the 2nd Battalion forward, the 3rd Battalion in support and the 4th Battalion in reserve. The three battalions moved forward from Montauban before first light, under command of Lieutenant–Colonel W. E. C. Tanner of the 2nd Battalion. On the approach, Tanner received instructions to detach two companies to the 26th Brigade in Longueval and sent B and C companies of the 4th Battalion. The 2nd Battalion reached a trench occupied by the 5th Camerons, which ran parallel to the wood and used this as a jumping-off line for the attack at 6:00 a.m.

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