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The region already faces a witches' brew of problems that environmentalists say are being worsened by climate change: coastal erosion, saltwater intrusion onto taro cropland and tourist sites, shortages of potable water, anemic economies propped up by foreign aid, disease, dependence on sugar-packed, processed food imports. And there are health problems like obesity and diabetes exacerbated by such food imports. A recent World Health Organization survey found that the South Pacific was the world's most overweight region. "We're not dealing with climate change on its own, because we have an expanding population and so greater stress on resources anyway," said Ashvini Fernando, regional climate change coordinator for the World Wildlife Fund South Pacific Program, based in Fiji. "Climate change makes those stresses so much greater." Some experts warn that, ultimately, these issues will combine to power a wave of emigrants fleeing the Pacific islands. Indeed, there are already signs of flight: according to a study by the Australian government, applications for New Zealand residency from eligible Pacific island nations shot up sharply in 2005 and 2006, compared with 2003.

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  • Nakay702
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当該地域は既に、環境保護論者が気候変化によって悪化している、と言う問題の恐ろしい害悪(*)に直面しています。すなわち、海岸侵食、タロイモ耕地や観光地上への塩水侵入、飲用水の不足、対外援助によって支えられた貧血気味(供給不足)の経済、疾病、依存、砂糖詰めの加工食品輸入への依存などです。また、そのような輸入食品によって悪化した、肥満や糖尿病のような健康問題があります。最近の世界保健機構の調査で、南太平洋地域が世界で最も体重超過の地域であることが分かりました。 「人口膨張があって、とにかくそれが資源に対するより大きな圧迫になっているので、私たちは気候変化そのものには対処していません。気候変化はその圧迫をさらに大きくします」と、フィジーに本拠がある世界野生生物基金南太平洋地域プログラムのための地域気候変化調整者アシビニ・フェルナンドは言いました。 何人かの専門家は、結局、これらの問題が結合して太平洋の島から逃げる移民の波に原動力を供給することになってしまうだろう、と警告します。実際、脱出の兆候が既にあります。すなわち、オーストラリア政府の研究によれば、2003年に比較して、2005年と2006年には、太平洋の資格ありとされる島国からのニュージーランドでの(仮)居住の応募者数が急激に上昇しました。 (*)witches' brew「魔女の酒」とは、すなわち、「恐ろしい痺れ薬・害悪」といったニュアンスでしょう。

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