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In 1967, Hunter "Patch" Adams entered the Medical College of Virginia. He was a very bright student, but one of the professors did not like him. Patch loved fun andhumor and acted like a fool even in college. The professor said to him, "If you want to be a clown, join the circus!" In fact, Patch wanted to be a clown, but he also wanted to but a doctor-the best foolish doctor in the world-who really cares for his patients. When he was a medical student, Patch had a chance to visit very sick children in a hospital. He asked a girl if she was doing fine. But the girl didn't answer. He quickly put something red on his nose and began acting like a clown. The room was soon full of laughter, and all the children there felt better. Patch did many other foolish things. For example, he rolled down a hill with a patient who was suffering from mental problems. He even dressed like a wild animal for an old patient who had the dream of going hunting before his death.

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1967年に、ハンター「パッチ」アダムズは、ヴァージニア医科大学に入学しました。 彼は非常に頭の良い学生でした、しかし、教授の1人は彼が好きではありませんでした。 パッチはおかしなことやユーモアが大好きで、大学にいてさえ馬鹿のようなふるまいをしました。 その教授は彼に言いました「君が道化になりたいなら、サーカスに入りなさい!」 実際、パッチは道化になりたかったのです、しかし、彼はまた彼の患者を本当に看護する医者 ― 世界で最も馬鹿な医者 ― になりたかったのです。 彼が医学生のとき、パッチには重病で入院している子供たちを訪ねる機会がありました。 彼は、ある女の子にうまくやっているかどうか、尋ねました。 しかし、その女の子は答えませんでした。 彼は、すぐに何か赤い物を鼻につけて、道化のようなふりをし始めました。 部屋は笑いですぐにいっぱいになりました、そして、そこのすべての子供たちは気分が前より良くなりました。 パッチは、他にも多くの馬鹿なことをしました。 たとえば、彼は、精神疾患を患っている患者と、丘を転がり落ちました。 死ぬ前に狩りをしに行くことを夢見ていた高齢の患者のために、彼は野生動物のような衣装を着さえしました。 <参考> パッチ・アダムス http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%91%E3%83%83%E3%83%81%E3%83%BB%E3%82%A2%E3%83%80%E3%83%A0%E3%82%B9 VOICE http://www.voice-inc.co.jp/store/workshop_last.php?genre1_code=03&genre2_code=019

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