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The cavalry, always the most honored branch of the army in Austria, was top notch, and the commanders Auffenberg relegated command to were very capable of deploying them to full effectiveness. Three of the Five Generals under his command were General der Kavallerie. The Infantry were also dependable, led by the professional soldiers brought into the military before the outbreak of the war. It was a dependable army and would prove so in the course of the first months of the war. Von Plehve's forces were superior in numbers. In fact all along the front the Russians were in numerical superiority, this made the position on Auffenberg's flanks dangerous. Plehve had the trusty Russian Cossacks, recruited from loyal monarchist families in the Urals and well trained, they could hold their own easily against their counterparts across the front. The infantry, however, was a weak point. While the Austro-Hungarians were properly supplied and trained, even Russian peacetime formations had supply problems from the beginning of mobilization. The Russian strength was in their numbers. The Austro-Hungarians moved forward in good order on 26 August and smashed into the Russian lines. Von Plehve's right flank was already shaken by the defeat of the Russian Fourth Army at the Battle of Kraśnik a few days earlier, and despite his typical quick action, he could do nothing to oppose a superior enemy. By the 31st, the Austro-Hungarians had taken approximately 20,000 prisoners, a huge amount for the first month of the war. These prisoners were some of Russia's best soldiers, despite their inferior supply they were loyal. The conscripts that would fill the ranks of Russia's armed forces in the coming years of war would be lacking in proper training and far less willing to fight and by the time of the Kerensky Offensive in 1917 loyal soldiers were few and far between on the Russian line. The first two battles (Kraśnik and Komarow) of Conrad's invasion of Poland had been crushing successes, and it seemed as though the Russian might not be able to prevent a crisis in Poland and conduct their invasion of East Prussia simultaneously, particularly with the conclusion of the Battle of Tannenberg a few days later. Russia lost 20,000 of its better soldiers. The two Austro-Hungarian armies were poised to move farther into Poland, and the Austro-Hungarians received a huge boost to morale. Despite the remaining lack of security in the east the triple victory of Kraśnik-Komarow-Tannenberg and the successful advance in France gave the Germans and Austro-Hungarians their greatest hope of a victorious Schlieffen Plan. However, this would be proved false hope in a matter of days - not only due to the German defeat at the Battle of the Marne.

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>The cavalry, always the most honored branch of the army in Austria, was top notch, and the commanders Auffenberg relegated command to were very capable of deploying them to full effectiveness. Three of the Five Generals under his command were General der Kavallerie. The Infantry were also dependable, led by the professional soldiers brought into the military before the outbreak of the war. It was a dependable army and would prove so in the course of the first months of the war. ⇒オーストリア軍隊の中で常にこの上なく尊敬されていた騎兵隊は最上級であり、アウフェンベルクは指揮権を付託した司令官らの展開能力を十分効果的に生かした。彼の指揮下にある5人の将軍のうち3人は騎兵隊の将軍であった。歩兵隊も、戦争の勃発前から軍に参入したプロの兵士たちが先導する頼もしい存在であった。それは頼りになる方面軍なので、戦争の最初の数か月のうちにそれが判明することになった。 >Von Plehve's forces were superior in numbers. In fact all along the front the Russians were in numerical superiority, this made the position on Auffenberg's flanks dangerous. Plehve had the trusty Russian Cossacks, recruited from loyal monarchist families in the Urals and well trained, they could hold their own easily against their counterparts across the front. The infantry, however, was a weak point. While the Austro-Hungarians were properly supplied and trained, even Russian peacetime formations had supply problems from the beginning of mobilization. ⇒フォン・プレーブの軍勢は数的に優勢であった。実際、ロシア軍が全前線で数的優位に立っていたため、アウフェンベルクの立場は両翼とも危険に晒されていた。プレーブは、信頼できるロシア軍のコサック兵を持っていたが、彼らはウラルの忠実な君主制の家族から募集され、よく訓練されていた。彼らは前線の向こう側で彼らに対抗する敵に対して自軍(の陣地)を保持するのはたやすいことだった。しかし、歩兵隊には弱点があった。オーストリア-ハンガリー軍が適切に補給され訓練された一方で、ロシア軍は平時の編成隊でさえ、動員の開始から補給問題を抱えていた。 >The Russian strength was in their numbers. The Austro-Hungarians moved forward in good order on 26 August and smashed into the Russian lines. Von Plehve's right flank was already shaken by the defeat of the Russian Fourth Army at the Battle of Kraśnik a few days earlier, and despite his typical quick action, he could do nothing to oppose a superior enemy. By the 31st, the Austro-Hungarians had taken approximately 20,000 prisoners, a huge amount for the first month of the war. These prisoners were some of Russia's best soldiers, despite their inferior supply they were loyal. ⇒ロシア軍の強さはその数にあった。オーストリア‐ハンガリー軍は8月26日に整然と前進し、ロシアの戦線内に突入した。フォン・プレーブの右側面隊は数日前の「クラシニクの戦い」におけるロシア第4方面軍の敗北によって既に動揺があり、彼特有の素早い戦闘行動にもかかわらず、優れた敵に対抗するためには何もできなかった。31日までに、オーストリア‐ハンガリー軍は約20,000人の捕虜を捕らえていた。これらの囚人は、より劣った物資供給状況にもかかわらず、ロシア軍の最も優れた兵士であった。 >The conscripts that would fill the ranks of Russia's armed forces in the coming years of war would be lacking in proper training and far less willing to fight and by the time of the Kerensky Offensive in 1917 loyal soldiers were few and far between on the Russian line. The first two battles (Kraśnik and Komarow) of Conrad's invasion of Poland had been crushing successes, and it seemed as though the Russian might not be able to prevent a crisis in Poland and conduct their invasion of East Prussia simultaneously, particularly with the conclusion of the Battle of Tannenberg a few days later. ⇒その後数年間の戦いでロシア軍の各階級を埋めることになる徴兵は適切な訓練に欠けており、戦う意欲は極めて少なく、忠実な兵士は、1917年の「ケレンスキー攻勢」まではロシア戦線の間でほんのわずかであった。コンラッドによるポーランド侵攻の最初の2つの戦い(クラシニクとコマロフ)は成功を粉砕され、それによってロシア軍がポーランドの危機を防ぎ、同時に東プロイセンの侵略、特に数日後の「タンネンベルクの戦い」を戦うことなどできないように思えた。 >Russia lost 20,000 of its better soldiers. The two Austro-Hungarian armies were poised to move farther into Poland, and the Austro-Hungarians received a huge boost to morale. Despite the remaining lack of security in the east the triple victory of Kraśnik-Komarow-Tannenberg and the successful advance in France gave the Germans and Austro-Hungarians their greatest hope of a victorious Schlieffen Plan. However, this would be proved false hope in a matter of days - not only due to the German defeat at the Battle of the Marne. ⇒ロシア軍は、優れた兵士を20,000人失った。オーストリア‐ハンガリー軍の2方面軍はさらにポーランドに移動する態勢にあり、オーストリア‐ハンガリー全軍が士気の上で大幅な後押しを受けた。東部における安全性の欠如が残っていたにもかかわらず、クラシニク‐コマロフ‐タンネンベルクの3重の勝利とフランスでの前進の成功はドイツ軍とオーストリア‐ハンガリー軍にシュリーフェン計画の勝利の遠大なる希望を与えた。しかし、これが偽りの希望と判明するのに ―「マルヌの戦い」におけるドイツ軍の敗北のせいばかりでなく― ほんの数日もかからかった。 ※全体にわたって出来事の記述ではないので、具体的な内容が掴みにくいです。誤訳があるかも知れませんが、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。

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