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In the wake of the battle Italy finally declared war against Germany, on 28 August.In later years, historians maintained that that battle (with 21,000 dead on the Italian side) was a useless and limited conquest, perhaps Cadorna's only victory. In reality, the Austrians, who were short on troops (having to fight on two fronts), retreated to Slovene territory where Cadorna sacrificed thousands of soldiers in futile attempts to advance toward Ljubljana and Trieste. The Austrians, who were better equipped, preferred to preserve their forces. The Italian generals, in an attempt to make up for their poor equipment, committed the Italians to frontal assaults, resulting in massive casualties.

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>In the wake of the battle Italy finally declared war against Germany, on 28 August.In later years, historians maintained that that battle (with 21,000 dead on the Italian side) was a useless and limited conquest, perhaps Cadorna's only victory. ⇒それまでの戦いに引き続いて、イタリアは8月28日ついにドイツに対する宣戦を布告した。後年歴史家は、(21,000人の死者がイタリアの側にあった)その戦闘は、無益にして制限つきの征服、おそらくカドルナの唯一の勝利であった、と主張した。 >In reality, the Austrians, who were short on troops (having to fight on two fronts), retreated to Slovene territory where Cadorna sacrificed thousands of soldiers in futile attempts to advance toward Ljubljana and Trieste. ⇒実際、オーストリア軍は、(2つの前線で戦わねばならなかったので)軍隊が不足してスロベニアの領土へ退いたが、カドルナは、そこでリュブリャナやトリエステへ向かって進軍しようとする無益な試みの只中で何千もの兵士を犠牲にしたのであった。 >The Austrians, who were better equipped, preferred to preserve their forces. The Italian generals, in an attempt to make up for their poor equipment, committed the Italians to frontal assaults, resulting in massive casualties. ⇒オーストリア軍は、よりよい装備をしていたが、彼らの軍団の温存の方をより好んだ。イタリア軍の将軍らは、その貧弱な装備を補おうとして、イタリア軍に急襲を託して、大量の犠牲者を出す結果を生んだのである。

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