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- C.Rosenthal, Major General, 11/9/18 William Stevens, 23rd Australian Infantry Battalion, originally from Melbourne was awarded a Bar to his Military Medal for his work during the battle. In part, his citation from C.Rosenthal, Major General reads: "In the Village fighting he personal lead a party of five which accounted for 16 of the enemy who put up a spirited resistance. Later during the consolidation, he personally supervised the placing of the six Company Lewis Guns, moving around the Company front in spite of fierce enemy fire. His work throughout was of the highest order, and his fighting spirit throughout was of the greatest value to the success of his Company." The Drocourt-Quéant Line (Wotan Stellung) was a set of mutually supporting defensive lines constructed by Germany between the French towns of Drocourt and Quéant during World War I. This defensive system was part of the northernmost section of the Hindenburg Line, a vast German defensive system that ran through northeastern France. It was attacked and captured by Canadian and British troops in the closing months of the war as part of Canada's Hundred Days of successful offensive campaigning that helped end the war. The Drocourt–Quéant Line ran between the French cities of Drocourt and Quéant and was part of a defensive system that ran from a point within the Hindenburg Line, eleven miles west of Cambrai, northward to within seven miles west of Douai and terminated along the front east of Armentières. The Drocourt–Quéant Line was a system in depth and incorporated a number of mutually supporting lines of defence. The system consisted of a front line system and a support line system, each consisting of two lines of trenches. The system incorporated numerous fortifications including concrete bunkers, machine gun posts and heavy belts of barbed wire. Capture At 5:00 a.m. in the morning on 2 September 1918, Canadian and British forces attacked the Drocourt–Quéant Line supported by tanks and aircraft. In twilight, the Canadian 1st Division attacked the line south-eastwards, on the extreme right, south of the Arras–Cambrai road, The Canadian 4th Division attacked in the centre between Dury and the main road and the British 4th Division attacked south of the River Sensee. Seven Canadians were awarded VCs individually that day: Bellenden Hutcheson, Arthur George Knight, William Henry Metcalf, Claude Nunney, Cyrus Wesley Peck, Walter Leigh Rayfield and John Francis Young. The next day the Germans retreated to the Hindenburg Line with the Allies taking many prisoners. The Canadian and British troops then moved on to their next battle, the Battle of Canal du Nord.

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>- C.Rosenthal, Major General, 11/9/18  William Stevens, 23rd Australian Infantry Battalion, originally from Melbourne was awarded a Bar to his Military Medal for his work during the battle. In part, his citation from C.Rosenthal, Major General reads: "In the Village fighting he personal lead a party of five which accounted for 16 of the enemy who put up a spirited resistance. Later during the consolidation, he personally supervised the placing of the six Company Lewis Guns, moving around the Company front in spite of fierce enemy fire. His work throughout was of the highest order, and his fighting spirit throughout was of the greatest value to the success of his Company." ⇒C.ローゼンタール、少将、11/9/1918  元メルボルン出身の第23オーストラリア軍歩兵大隊のウィリアム・スティーブンスは、戦闘中の勲功により軍事勲章を授与された。一部、C.ローゼンタール少将の表彰状にはこう書かれている。「村での戦いでは、彼がみずから導いていた5人の小隊が、激しく抵抗する16人の敵を相手にしていた。後で強化の間に、彼はルイス銃6個中隊の陣取りを個人的に指揮監督し、強烈な敵砲火にもかかわらず、中隊を前線に移動した。彼の指揮ぶりには、実にこの上ない秩序があり、彼の闘争心は徹頭徹尾最大の価値をもって、彼の中隊を成功にいざなった」。 ※この段落、誤訳があるかも知れませんが、どうぞ悪しからず。 >The Drocourt-Quéant Line (Wotan Stellung) was a set of mutually supporting defensive lines constructed by Germany between the French towns of Drocourt and Quéant during World War I. This defensive system was part of the northernmost section of the Hindenburg Line, a vast German defensive system that ran through northeastern France. ⇒ドロクール=ケアン戦線(ヴォータン陣地)は、ドイツ軍が第一次世界大戦中にフランスの町ドロクールとケアンの間に建造した、相互支持的な防衛戦線のセット(組合せ機構)であった。この防衛システムは、ヒンデンブルク戦線の最北端地区の部分であり、フランス東北部を通り抜ける巨大防衛システムであった。 >It was attacked and captured by Canadian and British troops in the closing months of the war as part of Canada's Hundred Days of successful offensive campaigning that helped end the war. The Drocourt–Quéant Line ran between the French cities of Drocourt and Quéant and was part of a defensive system that ran from a point within the Hindenburg Line, eleven miles west of Cambrai, northward to within seven miles west of Douai and terminated along the front east of Armentières. The Drocourt–Quéant Line was a system in depth and incorporated a number of mutually supporting lines of defence. The system consisted of a front line system and a support line system, each consisting of two lines of trenches. The system incorporated numerous fortifications including concrete bunkers, machine gun posts and heavy belts of barbed wire. ⇒それは、戦争の終結に貢献したカナダ軍による「百日(攻勢)」の一環として、カナダ・英国軍隊によって戦争終結の月に攻撃され、攻略された。ドロクール=ケアン戦線はドロクールとケアンのフランス都市の間を走っており、カンブレの西11マイル、ヒンデンブルク戦線内の一地点から北に向ってドゥーエの西7マイル以内の地点まで通って、アルマンチェール東の前線に沿って終る防御システムの一部であった。ドロクール=ケアン戦線は深み(奥行き)のあるシステムであり、数多くの相互に支持し合う防衛線を組み込んでいる。このシステムは、前線システムと支援戦線システムで構成され、それぞれ2つの塹壕戦線で構成されている。コンクリートのバンカー(防護堤)、機関銃の哨戒陣地(台座陣屋)、厳重な有刺鉄線地帯を含み、多数の要塞を組み込んだシステムであった。 >Capture  At 5:00 a.m. in the morning on 2 September 1918, Canadian and British forces attacked the Drocourt–Quéant Line supported by tanks and aircraft. In twilight, the Canadian 1st Division attacked the line south-eastwards, on the extreme right, south of the Arras–Cambrai road, The Canadian 4th Division attacked in the centre between Dury and the main road and the British 4th Division attacked south of the River Sensee. ⇒攻略  1918年9月2日午前5時、カナダ軍と英国軍は戦車と航空機の支持を得てドロクール=ケアン戦線を攻撃した。夕暮れ時に、カナダ軍第1師団がアラス=カンブレ道南の右翼端にある戦線南東部を攻撃し、カナダ第4師団がドゥリーと主要道間の中心部を攻撃し、英国軍第4師団がリバー・センセーを攻撃した。 >Seven Canadians were awarded VCs individually that day: Bellenden Hutcheson, Arthur George Knight, William Henry Metcalf, Claude Nunney, Cyrus Wesley Peck, Walter Leigh Rayfield and John Francis Young.  The next day the Germans retreated to the Hindenburg Line with the Allies taking many prisoners. The Canadian and British troops then moved on to their next battle, the Battle of Canal du Nord. ⇒ベレンドン・ハチェソン、アーサー・ジョージ・ナイト、ウィリアム・ヘンリー・メットカーフ、クラウド・ナニー、シー・ペックラス・ウェズリ、ウォルター・レイ・レイフィールド、ジョン・フランシス・ヤングの7人のカナダ人が個別にビクトリア十字勲章を授与された。  翌日、ドイツ軍はヒンデンブルク戦線に撤退し、連合国軍は多くの囚人を捕縛した。その後、カナダ軍と英国軍は次の戦闘「カナル・デュ・ノール(北運河)の戦い」に移った。

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