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After Marines were repeatedly urged to turn back by retreating French forces, Marine Captain Lloyd W. Williams of the 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines uttered the now-famous retort "Retreat? Hell, we just got here". Williams' battalion commander, Major Frederic Wise, later claimed to have said the famous words. On 4 June, Major General Bundy—commanding the 2nd Division—took command of the American sector of the front. Over the next two days, the Marines repelled the continuous German assaults. The 167th French Division arrived, giving Bundy a chance to consolidate his 2,000 yards (1,800 m) of front. Bundy's 3rd Brigade held the southern sector of the line, while the Marine brigade held the north of the line from Triangle Farm. At 03:45 on 6 June, the Allies launched an attack on the German forces, who were preparing their own strike. The French 167th Division attacked to the left of the American line, while the Marines attacked Hill 142 to prevent flanking fire against the French. As part of the second phase, the 2nd Division were to capture the ridge overlooking Torcy and Belleau Wood, as well as occupying Belleau Wood. However, the Marines failed to scout the woods. As a consequence, they missed a regiment of German infantry dug in, with a network of machine gun nests and artillery. At dawn, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines—commanded by Major Julius Turrill—was to attack Hill 142, but only two companies were in position. The Marines advanced in waves with bayonets fixed across an open wheat field that was swept with German machine gun and artillery fire, and many Marines were cut down. Captain Crowther commanding the 67th Company was killed almost immediately. Captain Hamilton and the 49th Company fought from wood to wood, fighting the entrenched Germans and overrunning their objective by 6 yards (5.5 m). At this point, Hamilton had lost all five junior officers, while the 67th had only one commissioned officer alive. Hamilton reorganized the two companies, establishing strong points and a defensive line. In the German counter-attack, then-Gunnery Sergeant Ernest A. Janson—who was serving under the name Charles Hoffman—repelled an advance of 12 German soldiers, killing two with his bayonet before the others fled; for this action he became the first Marine to receive the Medal of Honor in World War I.

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>After Marines were repeatedly urged to turn back by retreating French forces, Marine Captain Lloyd W. Williams of the 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines uttered the now-famous retort "Retreat? Hell, we just got here". Williams' battalion commander, Major Frederic Wise, later claimed to have said the famous words. ⇒海兵隊員は、フランス軍団によって後退するようにと繰り返し勧められた後、第5海兵隊、第2大隊のロイド・W.ウィリアムズ中尉は、今や有名になった発言「退却だって? 何てこった、今来たばかりだというのに」と返答した。後にウィリアムズの大隊司令官、フレデリック・ワイズ大佐が、有名な言葉を言ったのは自分だと主張した。 >On 4 June, Major General Bundy—commanding the 2nd Division—took command of the American sector of the front. Over the next two days, the Marines repelled the continuous German assaults. The 167th French Division arrived, giving Bundy a chance to consolidate his 2,000 yards (1,800 m) of front. Bundy's 3rd Brigade held the southern sector of the line, while the Marine brigade held the north of the line from Triangle Farm. At 03:45 on 6 June, the Allies launched an attack on the German forces, who were preparing their own strike. ⇒6月4日、-第2師団を指揮する-バンディー少将が、米国軍前線地区の指揮をとった。次の2日間で、海兵隊員はドイツ軍の連続襲撃を撃退した。フランス軍第167師団が到着し、バンディーに2,000ヤード(1,800 m)の前線を強化する機会を与えた。バンディーの第3旅団は戦線の南地区を、海兵隊はトライアングル農場戦線の北側を受け持った。6月6日03時45分に、連合国軍は先手攻撃を打つための準備をしていたドイツ軍に対して攻撃を仕かけた。 >The French 167th Division attacked to the left of the American line, while the Marines attacked Hill 142 to prevent flanking fire against the French. As part of the second phase, the 2nd Division were to capture the ridge overlooking Torcy and Belleau Wood, as well as occupying Belleau Wood. However, the Marines failed to scout the woods. As a consequence, they missed a regiment of German infantry dug in, with a network of machine gun nests and artillery. ⇒フランス軍第167師団は米国軍の左翼方向に向かって攻撃し、海兵隊員は142番ヒルを攻撃してフランス軍に対する側面砲撃を防いだ。第2段階の一環として、第2師団はベロー・ウッドを占拠するとともに、トーシーとベロー・ウッドを見下ろす尾根を攻略することになった。しかし、海兵隊は森の偵察に失敗した。結果として、彼らはドイツ軍の歩兵連隊が機銃巣と大砲のネットワークを備えた塹壕に潜んでいるのを見逃していた。 >At dawn, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines—commanded by Major Julius Turrill—was to attack Hill 142, but only two companies were in position. The Marines advanced in waves with bayonets fixed across an open wheat field that was swept with German machine gun and artillery fire, and many Marines were cut down. Captain Crowther commanding the 67th Company was killed almost immediately. Captain Hamilton and the 49th Company fought from wood to wood, fighting the entrenched Germans and overrunning their objective by 6 yards (5.5 m). At this point, Hamilton had lost all five junior officers, while the 67th had only one commissioned officer alive. Hamilton reorganized the two companies, establishing strong points and a defensive line. ⇒明け方には、-ジュリアス・ターリル少佐指揮下の-第1大隊、第5海兵隊が142番ヒルを攻撃することになっていたが、2個中隊だけしか陣地にいなかった。海兵隊員は銃剣で武装し、麦畑を横切って波状編成で進軍したが、ドイツ軍の機関銃と砲撃で掃討され、多くの海兵隊員が削減された。第67中隊を指揮するクラウザー中尉は、ほぼ直ちに殺害された。ハミルトン大尉と第49中隊は森から森へ移動戦を戦い、堅固なドイツ軍と戦い、標的を6ヤード(5.5m)超えた。ハミルトンはこの時点で5人の下級将校を失ったが、第67中隊には任官将校が1人しかいなかった。ハミルトンは2個中隊を再編成し、強化地点と守備戦線を確立した。 >In the German counter-attack, then-Gunnery Sergeant Ernest A. Janson—who was serving under the name Charles Hoffman—repelled an advance of 12 German soldiers, killing two with his bayonet before the others fled; for this action he became the first Marine to receive the Medal of Honor in World War I. ⇒ドイツ軍の反撃では、チャールズ・ホフマンという名前で奉仕していたアーネスト・A.ヤンソン軍曹は、ドイツ軍12人の進軍を撃退し、他の兵が逃げる前に銃砲で2人を殺した。この行動のために、彼は第1次世界大戦で名誉の勲章を受ける最初の海兵となった。

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