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The ground was powdery to a depth of 30 ft (9 m) and when wet, had the consistency of porridge. The ground dried quickly, except where water was held in shell-holes and after a few dry days became dusty. British offensive preparations Main article: The British set-piece attack in mid-1917 Brigadier-General J. H. Davidson intervened again on 1 August, with a memorandum urging caution on Haig and Gough. Davidson recommended that the preliminary operation by II Corps not be hurried, a full artillery preparation and relief of the divisions already engaged, should be completed before the operation, as tired and depleted units had often failed in attacks in the past. Two or three clear days were needed for accurate artillery fire, especially as captured ground on the Gheluvelt plateau, gave better observation and German maps revealed the positions of German machine-gun emplacements, which being small and concealed, would need precise shooting by the artillery to destroy. Capture of the black line from Inverness Copse north to Westhoek, would be insufficient to cover an advance from the Steenbeek further north and large German counter-attacks could be expected on the plateau, given that its retention was fundamental to the German defensive scheme. Two more divisions were sent to II Corps as a reinforcement. Few of the pillboxes captured on 31 July, had been damaged by artillery-fire and before the attack, the 109th Brigade commander Brigadier-General Ricardo, arranged three-minute bombardments on selected pillboxes and blockhouses by the XIX Corps heavy artillery, with pauses so that the artillery observers could make corrections to contradictory maps and photographs. It was discovered that on many of the targets, the shell dispersion covered hundreds of yards, as did wire-cutting bombardments. On 2 August, at the suggestion of Brigadier-General Hugh Elles, commander of the Tank Corps, it was decided that the surviving tanks were to be held back due to the weather, to ensure that they could be used en mass later on, although some were used in late August.

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>The ground was powdery to a depth of 30 ft (9 m) and when wet, had the consistency of porridge. The ground dried quickly, except where water was held in shell-holes and after a few dry days became dusty. ⇒30フィート(9m)の深さまで粉状であった地面が、雨天のもとでは一面の粥状となった。砲弾痕に水がたまった所を除いて、地面は乾燥した日が数日続いたあと、急速に干上がってほこりっぽくなった。 >British offensive preparations Main article: The British set-piece attack in mid-1917 Brigadier-General J. H. Davidson intervened again on 1 August, with a memorandum urging caution on Haig and Gough. Davidson recommended that the preliminary operation by II Corps not be hurried, a full artillery preparation and relief of the divisions already engaged, should be completed before the operation, as tired and depleted units had often failed in attacks in the past. ⇒英国軍の攻勢準備 主要な記事:中間1917年半ばにおける英国軍のセットピース(綿密な計画の)攻撃 J. H.デビッドソン准将は、8月1日に、警告を強く主張する覚書を引っさげて再びヘイグとゴフに介入してきた。デビッドソンは、第II軍団による予備的な作戦行動は急がないように勧めた。過去の攻撃では、疲弊し消耗した部隊がしばしば失敗したのだから、すでに取り組んでいる銃砲の完全準備や師団の救援は、作戦行動の前に十分に完成させるべきである、ということを推奨した。 >Two or three clear days were needed for accurate artillery fire, especially as captured ground on the Gheluvelt plateau, gave better observation and German maps revealed the positions of German machine-gun emplacements, which being small and concealed, would need precise shooting by the artillery to destroy. Capture of the black line from Inverness Copse north to Westhoek, would be insufficient to cover an advance from the Steenbeek further north and large German counter-attacks could be expected on the plateau, given that its retention was fundamental to the German defensive scheme. Two more divisions were sent to II Corps as a reinforcement. ⇒正確な砲火の発砲のためには、晴天の日が2,3日は必要であった。特に、攻略したゲルヴェルト高原の地面からよりよい観察ができて、ドイツ軍の機関銃砲床の所在が地理上明らかになったので、それを破壊するためには精密な大砲の射撃が必要であった。インヴァーネス雑木林から北のウェストホークまでの黒線部に対する攻略は、シュテーンベークからさらに北への進軍を庇護するためには不十分で、ゲルヴェルト高原の保持がドイツ軍の防御計画に必須なものであるからには、高原に対するドイツ軍の大反撃が予期された。それで、強化隊としてさらに2個師団が第II軍団に送られた。 >Few of the pillboxes captured on 31 July, had been damaged by artillery-fire and before the attack, the 109th Brigade commander Brigadier-General Ricardo, arranged three-minute bombardments on selected pillboxes and blockhouses by the XIX Corps heavy artillery, with pauses so that the artillery observers could make corrections to contradictory maps and photographs. ⇒7月31日に捕らえたピルボックスのうち、砲火砲撃によって損われたものは少なかった。そして、第109旅団司令官リカルド准将は、攻撃の前に、選び出したピルボックスと防塞に対する第XIX軍団の重砲隊による3分砲撃を手配した。砲兵観察隊が矛盾の生じた地図と写真に訂正を施すことができるように、(砲撃途中に)休止を挟んだ。 >It was discovered that on many of the targets, the shell dispersion covered hundreds of yards, as did wire-cutting bombardments. On 2 August, at the suggestion of Brigadier-General Hugh Elles, commander of the Tank Corps, it was decided that the surviving tanks were to be held back due to the weather, to ensure that they could be used en mass later on, although some were used in late August. ⇒ワイヤ切断のための砲撃で見られたように、標的の多くにおいて砲弾の拡散は数百ヤード分がカバーされることが明らかになった。8月2日に、戦車隊司令官ヒュー・エルズ准将の提案で、生き残った戦車は、一部8月末に使われたが、後で全部一緒に使うことを保証するために、天候に応じてとっておくことが決められた。

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