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Two brigades of the 24th Division in Corps reserve, advanced into the X Corps sector and reached Dammstrasse on time. The brigades easily reached their objectives around Bug Wood, Rose Wood and Verhaest Farm, taking unopposed many German pillboxes. The brigades captured 289 Germans and six field guns for a loss of six casualties, advancing 800 yards (730 m) along the Roozebeek valley, then took Ravine Wood unopposed on the left flank. The left battalion was drawn back to meet the 47th Division, which was still held up by machine-gun fire from the spoil bank. The final objectives of the British offensive had been taken, except for the area of the Ypres–Comines canal near the spoil bank and 1,000 yards (910 m) of the Oosttaverne line, at the junction of the II Anzac Corps and IX Corps. Despite a heavy bombardment until 6:55 p.m., the Germans at the spoil bank repulsed another infantry attack. The reserve battalion which had been moved up for the second attack on the spoil bank, had been caught in a German artillery bombardment while assembling for the attack. The companies which attacked then met with massed machine-gun fire during the advance and only advanced half-way to the spoil bank. The 207 survivors of the original 301 infantry, were withdrawn when German reinforcements were seen arriving from the canal cutting and no further attempts were made. The situation near the Blauwepoortbeek worsened, when German troops were seen assembling near Steingast Farm, close to the Warneton road. A British SOS barrage fell on the 12th Australian Brigade, which was inadvertently digging-in 250 yards (230 m) beyond its objective. The Australians stopped the German counter-attack with small-arms fire but many survivors began to withdraw spontaneously, until they stopped in relative safety on the ridge.

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>Two brigades of the 24th Division in Corps reserve, advanced into the X Corps sector and reached Dammstrasse on time. The brigades easily reached their objectives around Bug Wood, Rose Wood and Verhaest Farm, taking unopposed many German pillboxes. The brigades captured 289 Germans and six field guns for a loss of six casualties, advancing 800 yards (730 m) along the Roozebeek valley, then took Ravine Wood unopposed on the left flank. ⇒軍団予備の第24師団所属2個旅団が、第X部隊地区に進軍して、時間通りにダムシュトラッセに着いた。同旅団はバグ・ウッド、ローズ・ウッドおよびフェアハエスト農場周辺の標的に簡単に到達して、無抵抗のうちに多くのドイツ軍ピルボックスを抑えた。旅団は、6人の犠牲者を失った代価として289人のドイツ兵と6門の野戦砲を捕らえて、ローツェベーク渓谷に沿って800ヤード(730m)進み、それから左側面上で無抵抗のラヴィン・ウッドを奪取した。 >The left battalion was drawn back to meet the 47th Division, which was still held up by machine-gun fire from the spoil bank. The final objectives of the British offensive had been taken, except for the area of the Ypres–Comines canal near the spoil bank and 1,000 yards (910 m) of the Oosttaverne line, at the junction of the II Anzac Corps and IX Corps. Despite a heavy bombardment until 6:55 p.m., the Germans at the spoil bank repulsed another infantry attack. ⇒左翼の大隊は、引き返して第47師団に会ったが、この師団はまだ、戦利品貯蔵所からの機関銃砲火を止められていた。英国軍攻撃の最終標的は、戦利品貯蔵所近くのイープル–コミーヌ運河の領域、および第IIアンザック兵部隊と第IX部隊が接合する所にあるオースタフェルネ戦線の1,000ヤード(910m)分を除けば、(すでに)奪取されていた。午後6時55分までの重爆撃にもかかわらず、戦利品貯蔵所のドイツ軍は、もう一つの歩兵連隊攻撃を撃退した。 >The reserve battalion which had been moved up for the second attack on the spoil bank, had been caught in a German artillery bombardment while assembling for the attack. The companies which attacked then met with massed machine-gun fire during the advance and only advanced half-way to the spoil bank. The 207 survivors of the original 301 infantry, were withdrawn when German reinforcements were seen arriving from the canal cutting and no further attempts were made. ⇒戦利品貯蔵所への2回目の攻撃のために移動していた予備大隊は、攻撃のために集まっている間にドイツ軍の砲撃に捕えられた。そのとき攻撃した中隊は、進軍の間に大量の機関銃砲火を受けて、戦利品貯蔵所への途中まで進軍するのがやっとであった。当初の歩兵連隊301人のうち207人の生残り兵は、ドイツ軍増援隊が運河の切通しから到着するのが見られたときに撤退して、更なる試みはなされなかった。 >The situation near the Blauwepoortbeek worsened, when German troops were seen assembling near Steingast Farm, close to the Warneton road. A British SOS barrage fell on the 12th Australian Brigade, which was inadvertently digging-in 250 yards (230 m) beyond its objective. The Australians stopped the German counter-attack with small-arms fire but many survivors began to withdraw spontaneously, until they stopped in relative safety on the ridge. ⇒ドイツ軍隊がヴァルネトン道に接するシュタインガスト農場の近くに集まっているのが見られたとき、ブラウヴェポールツベーク近辺の状況は悪化した。英国軍のSOS集中砲火が第12オーストラリア旅団の頭上に落ちたが、彼らは不注意にもその標的を250ヤード(230m)越えて塹壕を掘っていたのである。オーストラリア軍は、ドイツ軍の反撃を小銃砲火で食い止めたが、多くの生存者が自発的に撤退し始めて、尾根上の相対的に安全な場所まで行って留まった。

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