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(Some witnesses considered that the state of the ground was worse than at Ypres a year later.) The ground in the Ancre valley was in the worst condition, a wilderness of mud, flooded trenches, shell-hole posts, corpses and broken equipment, overlooked and vulnerable to sniping from German positions. Little could be done beyond holding the line and frequently relieving troops, who found the physical and mental strain almost unbearable. Supplies had to be moved up by soldiers at night, to avoid sniping by German infantry and artillery-fire. Horses in transport units were used as pack animals and died when the oat ration was reduced to 6 pounds (2.7 kg) per day. The weather slightly improved in January and on 14 January, the temperature fell enough to freeze the ground.

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>(Some witnesses considered that the state of the ground was worse than at Ypres a year later.) The ground in the Ancre valley was in the worst condition, a wilderness of mud, flooded trenches, shell-hole posts, corpses and broken equipment, overlooked and vulnerable to sniping from German positions. Little could be done beyond holding the line and frequently relieving troops, who found the physical and mental strain almost unbearable. ⇒(地面の状態は、1年後のイープルでの状態より悪かったとみなす目撃者もいた。)アンクル渓谷の地面は、泥地の荒野、水浸しの塹壕や銃弾痕、死体と壊れた器材・兵器の残骸だらけという最悪の状態で、ドイツ軍の陣地からよく見渡されて、攻撃されやすい状況であった。戦線を保持すること以上には、しばしば、軍隊を救うこと以上には、ほとんど何もすることができず、彼ら(負傷兵ら)は肉体的・精神的な疲労困憊が、ほとんど耐えられない状況にあった。 >Supplies had to be moved up by soldiers at night, to avoid sniping by German infantry and artillery-fire. Horses in transport units were used as pack animals and died when the oat ration was reduced to 6 pounds (2.7 kg) per day. The weather slightly improved in January and on 14 January, the temperature fell enough to freeze the ground. ⇒供給必需品は、ドイツ軍の歩兵隊や砲火に攻撃されるのを避けるため、夜間に兵士が運び上げなければならなかった。輸送部隊の馬が運び屋の駄獣として酷使され、オート麦の割当てが1日6ポンド(2.7キログラム)に減らされたとき死んでしまった。天気は1月にわずかによくなったが、1月14日には温度がぐっと下がって地面を凍てつかせた。

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