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A turn in the wheel of fortune came for Machiavelli. With Spain's assistance, the Medicis overthrew the republic and restored their rule in Florence.Machiavelli was discharged, imprisoned,tortured, and finally banished to his small country estate near San Cascano. There, except for brief periods, he remained in retirement untill his death in 1527. His principal pastime during those, to him,long dull years was writing: The Prince, The Discourses,The Art of War,and the History of Florence-all primarily concerned with politics, ancient and contemporary. Any sentiment in Machiavelli's nature in relation to public affairs is hard to detect, but on one matter he felt deeply. He was a genuine patriot with an ardent longing for a strong, united Italy. He might be a cold, skeptical observer, a cynical man of pure intellect, untill he discussed Italian unity, and then he became inspired with passion, eloquence, warmth, and life. Italy's condition in the early, sixteen century was sad enough to make any patriot weep.

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以下のとおりお答えします。(ところで、till を考えるので間違いやすいところですが、untill でなく、until です。) マキアヴエリにとって幸運の回転の曲がり角がやって来ました。スペインの援助で、メディチ一家が共和国を倒し、フィレンツェに彼らの支配を復活しました。マキアヴエリは、解任され、収監され、拷問され、ついにサン・カスカノ近くの小さな田園の別荘地へ追放されました。そこで彼は、ほんの短い期間を除いて、1527年の死去まで隠遁しました。その間の長い退屈な歳月にあって、彼にとってのおもな娯楽は執筆でした。すなわち、「君主論」、「談話論」、「戦術論」、それと「おもに古代・同時代の政治に関連するーフィレンツェ全史」。 公務に関しては、マキアヴエリの本質的な見解はどれについてもそれを検知することは難しいが、ある1つの問題において、彼は深く感じ入っていました。彼は、統一された強いイタリアに対して、熱烈な切望を抱く純粋な愛国者でした。イタリアの統一について発議するまでの彼は、冷酷で懐疑的な傍観者、純粋知性だけの皮肉屋であったかもしれませんが、そのころ彼は、情熱、雄弁、温情、命などを奮い立たせるに至ったのでした。16世紀の初期におけるイタリアの状態は、いかなる愛国者も泣かさずにはおかないほど悲惨なものだったのです。

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