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日本語訳を教えてください(かなり長文です)(2)

Why Chinese Mothers Are Superiorという記事の日本語訳教えてください。よろしくお願いします。 Other studies indicate that compared to Western parents, Chinese parents spend approximately 10 times as long every day drilling academic activities with their children. By contrast, Western kids are more likely to participate in sports teams. What Chinese parents understand is that nothing is fun until you're good at it. To get good at anything you have to work, and children on their own never want to work, which is why it is crucial to override their preferences. This often requires fortitude on the part of the parents because the child will resist; things are always hardest at the beginning, which is where Western parents tend to give up. But if done properly, the Chinese strategy produces a virtuous circle. Tenacious practice, practice, practice is crucial for excellence; rote repetition is underrated in America. Once a child starts to excel at something—whether it's math, piano, pitching or ballet—he or she gets praise, admiration and satisfaction. This builds confidence and makes the once not-fun activity fun. This in turn makes it easier for the parent to get the child to work even more. Chinese parents can get away with things that Western parents can't. Once when I was young—maybe more than once—when I was extremely disrespectful to my mother, my father angrily called me "garbage" in our native Hokkien dialect. It worked really well. I felt terrible and deeply ashamed of what I had done. But it didn't damage my self-esteem or anything like that. I knew exactly how highly he thought of me. I didn't actually think I was worthless or feel like a piece of garbage. As an adult, I once did the same thing to Sophia, calling her garbage in English when she acted extremely disrespectfully toward me. When I mentioned that I had done this at a dinner party, I was immediately ostracized. One guest named Marcy got so upset she broke down in tears and had to leave early.

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他の研究は、西洋の親と比べて、中国人の親が約10倍長い時間、自分たちの子供と共に毎日学問的なことを教え込むことに費やすと言うことを示しています。対照的に、西洋の子供はスポーツチームにより参加することがおおそうです。 中国人の親が理解していることは、物事は、上手になるまで、何もおもしろくないということです。 何かに上達するためには、頑張らなければなりません、そして、一人で子供は決して頑張ろうとは思いません、そして、それが子供たちの好みを無視することが重要である理由なのです。子供が抵抗するので、これは親の側にしばしば不屈の精神を要求します。 何事も始めがいつも最も困難です。そして、その部分を西洋人の親はあきらめる傾向があります。しかし、適切にするなら、中国人の戦略は好循環を生み出します。優秀さには、粘り強い練習、練習、練習が極めて重要です;機械的反復はアメリカでは過小評価されます。ひとたび、子供が何かで優れ始めると―それが、数学、ピアノ、ピッチング、バレエ、何であろうと―その子は、称賛、賛美、満足を得る様になります。かつては楽しい活動でなかったことが、楽しみになります。こうなれば、今度は、親が子供にもっと頑張らせるのがより容易になります。 中国人の親は西洋人の親がうまくやることができないものをうまくやることができます。 私は、若い頃一度―多分一度以上―母に対して、ひどく無礼なこと言った時、父は、怒って、私たちの福建語方言で、私を「ゴミ」と呼びました。これは本当に効果的でした。私はまずかったと感じ自分のしたことを深く恥じました。しかし、そのことは、私の自尊心などを傷つけはしませんでした。私は、父が私のことをどれほど高く評価してくれているかちゃんとわかっていたからです。私は、実際、自分が無価値だとか、ゴミだとは感じませんでした。 大人になって、私は一度ソフィアに対して同じことをしたことがあります、彼女が私に対してとても無礼なふるまいをした時、英語で彼女をゴミと呼んだのです。私が晩餐会でこのことに言及したとき、すぐに私は仲間外れにされました。 マーシーという一人のお客様は大変動揺して、彼女は、泣いてしまい、早く帰らなければなりませんでした。

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