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However the German soldiers were pressing to get home. It was scarcely possible to arouse their readiness for battle anew, and desertions were on the increase. The Imperial Government stayed on course and Ludendorff was replaced by Wilhelm Groener. On 5 November, the Allies agreed to take up negotiations for a truce, now also demanding reparation payments. The latest note from Wilson was received in Berlin on 6 November. That same day, the delegation led by Matthias Erzberger departed for France. A much bigger obstacle, which contributed to the five-week delay in the signing of the Armistice and to the resulting social deterioration in Europe, was the fact that the French, British and Italian governments had no desire to accept the "Fourteen Points" and President Wilson's subsequent promises. For example, they assumed that the de-militarization suggested by Wilson would be limited to the Central Powers. There were also contradictions with their post-War plans that did not include a consistent implementation of the ideal of national self-determination. As Czernin points out: The Allied statesmen were faced with a problem: so far they had considered the "fourteen commandments" as a piece of clever and effective American propaganda, designed primarily to undermine the fighting spirit of the Central Powers, and to bolster the morale of the lesser Allies. Now, suddenly, the whole peace structure was supposed to be built up on that set of "vague principles", most of which seemed to them thoroughly unrealistic, and some of which, if they were to be seriously applied, were simply unacceptable. German Revolution Main article: German Revolution of 1918–19 The sailors' revolt which took place during the night of 29 to 30 October 1918 in the naval port of Wilhelmshaven spread across the whole country within days and led to the proclamation of a republic on 9 November 1918 and to the announcement of the abdication of Kaiser Wilhelm II. However in various areas soldiers challenged the authority of their officers and on occasion established Soldiers' Councils. Thus for example the Brussels Soldiers' Council was set up by revolutionary soldiers on 9 November 1918. Also on 9 November, Max von Baden handed over the office of Chancellor to Friedrich Ebert, a Social Democrat. Ebert's SPD and Erzberger's Catholic Centre Party had enjoyed an uneasy relationship with the Imperial government since Bismarck's era in the 1870s and 1880s. They were well represented in the Imperial Reichstag, which had little power over the government, and had been calling for a negotiated peace since 1917. Their prominence in the peace negotiations would cause the new Weimar Republic to lack legitimacy in right-wing and militarist eyes. Negotiation process

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>However the German soldiers were pressing to get home. It was scarcely possible to arouse their readiness for battle anew, and desertions were on the increase. The Imperial Government stayed on course and Ludendorff was replaced by Wilhelm Groener. On 5 November, the Allies agreed to take up negotiations for a truce, now also demanding reparation payments.  The latest note from Wilson was received in Berlin on 6 November. That same day, the delegation led by Matthias Erzberger departed for France. ⇒しかし、ドイツ軍の兵士らは家に帰ることを強く求めていた。新たな戦いの準備を喚起することはほとんど不可能であり、戦場放棄・脱走が増加していた。帝国政府は従来の姿勢を崩さず、ルーデンドルフはヴィルヘルム・グルナーに代わった。11月5日、連合国は停戦協定を締結することで合意し、すでに賠償金支払いをも求めていた。  11月6日、ウィルソンからの最新の通牒がベルリンに届けられた。その同じ日に、マチアス・エルツベルガーが率いる(ドイツ)代表団がフランスに出発した。 >A much bigger obstacle, which contributed to the five-week delay in the signing of the Armistice and to the resulting social deterioration in Europe, was the fact that the French, British and Italian governments had no desire to accept the "Fourteen Points" and President Wilson's subsequent promises. For example, they assumed that the de-militarization suggested by Wilson would be limited to the Central Powers. There were also contradictions with their post-War plans that did not include a consistent implementation of the ideal of national self-determination. As Czernin points out: ⇒停戦協定締結の5週間の遅れと、ヨーロッパの社会的悪化に作用した大きな障害は、フランス、英国、イタリア政府がウィルソン大統領の「14か条」とその後の約束を受け入れることを望まないという事実であった。例えば、彼らは、ウィルソンによって提案された非軍備化が中央同盟国軍に限定されることを示すのが当然と考えた。戦後の計画に、国家自決の理想を一貫して実施することを含まないという矛盾もあった。チェルニンはこう指摘した。 >The Allied statesmen were faced with a problem: so far they had considered the "fourteen commandments" as a piece of clever and effective American propaganda, designed primarily to undermine the fighting spirit of the Central Powers, and to bolster the morale of the lesser Allies. Now, suddenly, the whole peace structure was supposed to be built up on that set of "vague principles", most of which seemed to them thoroughly unrealistic, and some of which, if they were to be seriously applied, were simply unacceptable. ⇒連合国軍の政治家たちはある問題に直面していた。すなわち、彼らはこう見なしたのである。これまでのところ「14の戒め」は、主に中央同盟国軍の戦闘精神を弱めるように設計された、巧妙で効果的なアメリカの宣伝の一部である、と。今や、突然、その平和構造の全体が「曖昧な原則」に基づいて構築されたと想定され、その原則の大部分が徹底した非現実的なものに見え、真剣に適用しようとすれば単純に受け入れがたいものであった。 >German Revolution Main article: German Revolution of 1918–19  The sailors' revolt which took place during the night of 29 to 30 October 1918 in the naval port of Wilhelmshaven spread across the whole country within days and led to the proclamation of a republic on 9 November 1918 and to the announcement of the abdication of Kaiser Wilhelm II. However in various areas soldiers challenged the authority of their officers and on occasion established Soldiers' Councils. Thus for example the Brussels Soldiers' Council was set up by revolutionary soldiers on 9 November 1918. ⇒ドイツ革命 主要記事:1918年~19年のドイツ革命  1918年10月29日~30日の夜間、ヴィルヘルムスハーフェンの海軍港で起きた船員たちの反乱は、数日で全国に広がり、1918年11月9日の共和国宣言とヴィルヘルムII世カイザーの退位の発表に至った。しかし、様々な地域において、兵士は将校の権威に挑戦し、時には兵士評議会を設立した。かくして、例えば、1918年11月9日、革命兵士らによって「ブリュッセル兵士評議会」が設立されたのである。 >Also on 9 November, Max von Baden handed over the office of Chancellor to Friedrich Ebert, a Social Democrat. Ebert's SPD and Erzberger's Catholic Centre Party had enjoyed an uneasy relationship with the Imperial government since Bismarck's era in the 1870s and 1880s. They were well represented in the Imperial Reichstag, which had little power over the government, and had been calling for a negotiated peace since 1917. Their prominence in the peace negotiations would cause the new Weimar Republic to lack legitimacy in right-wing and militarist eyes.  Negotiation process ⇒また、11月9日には、マックス・フォン・バーデンが首相官邸を社会民主主義者フリードリヒ・エーベルトに引き渡ししまった。エバートのSPD(ドイツ社会民主党)とエルツベルガーのカトリック中央党は、1870年代、1880年代のビスマルク時代から帝国政府との不安な関係を持ってきた。彼らはよく帝国議会の代表になったが、政府に対する権限はほとんどなかった。彼らは、1917年以来平和交渉を求めていた。その平和交渉で彼らが目立ったことが、右翼および軍国主義者の目には、新しいワイマール共和国が正当性を欠くとの印象を引き起こすことにつながったようである。  交渉過程

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