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Byng was given use of No. 2 Squadron, No. 8 (Naval) Squadron, No. 25 Squadron, No. 40 Squadron and No. 43 Squadron, with No. 16 Squadron permanently attached to the Canadian Corps and employed exclusively for observation and artillery support. Aerial reconnaissance was often a hazardous task because of a requirement to fly at slow speeds and at low altitudes. The task was made all the more dangerous with the arrival of additional German flying squadrons, including Manfred von Richthofen's highly experienced and well equipped Jasta 11, which led to a sharp increase in Royal Flying Corps casualties. Although significantly outnumbering the Germans, the Royal Flying Corps lost 131 aircraft during the first week of April alone. Despite the losses suffered by the Royal Flying Corps, the Imperial German Army Air Service failed to prevent the Royal Flying Corps from carrying out its prime objective, namely the continued support of the army throughout the Arras Offensive with up-to-date aerial photographs and reconnaissance information. German Sixth Army commander General Ludwig von Falkenhausen was responsible for the Cambrai–Lille sector and commanded 20 divisions, plus reserves. Vimy Ridge itself was principally defended by the ad hoc Gruppe Vimy formation based under I Bavarian Reserve Corps commander General der Infanterie Karl von Fasbender.

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>Byng was given use of No. 2 Squadron, No. 8 (Naval) Squadron, No. 25 Squadron, No. 40 Squadron and No. 43 Squadron, with No. 16 Squadron permanently attached to the Canadian Corps and employed exclusively for observation and artillery support. ⇒ビングは、恒久的にカナダ軍団に配属されて、もっぱら斥候観察と砲兵隊支援のためにだけ使用されるNo.16飛行大隊とともに、No.2飛行大隊、No.8(ナバル)飛行大隊、No.25飛行大隊、No.40飛行大隊、およびNo.43飛行大隊の使用権を与えられた。 >Aerial reconnaissance was often a hazardous task because of a requirement to fly at slow speeds and at low altitudes. The task was made all the more dangerous with the arrival of additional German flying squadrons, including Manfred von Richthofen's highly experienced and well equipped Jasta 11, which led to a sharp increase in Royal Flying Corps casualties. ⇒空中斥候調査は、しばしば遅い速度でしかも低い高度で飛ぶ必要性があるため、危険な仕事であった。仕事は、さらなるドイツ軍遊撃飛行隊の到着で、いっそう危険になった。その飛行隊は、極めて(飛行・参戦)経験豊かで装備の優れたマンフレッド・フォン・リヒトホーフェンのヤスタ11型機を含んでいた。この飛行隊の到着で、英国王立航空隊としては急激に犠牲者が増加するに至った。 >Although significantly outnumbering the Germans, the Royal Flying Corps lost 131 aircraft during the first week of April alone. Despite the losses suffered by the Royal Flying Corps, the Imperial German Army Air Service failed to prevent the Royal Flying Corps from carrying out its prime objective, namely the continued support of the army throughout the Arras Offensive with up-to-date aerial photographs and reconnaissance information. ⇒数的にはドイツ軍よりかなり優位にあったが、英国王立航空隊は4月の第1週目の間に131機の航空機を失った。英国王立航空隊のその損失にもかかわらず、帝国ドイツ軍航空部は、英国王立航空隊がその主要目的、すなわち、最新の航空写真と調査情報によるアラス攻撃を通じての、方面軍への継続的な支援を実行することを妨げることはできなかった。 >German Sixth Army commander General Ludwig von Falkenhausen was responsible for the Cambrai–Lille sector and commanded 20 divisions, plus reserves. Vimy Ridge itself was principally defended by the ad hoc Gruppe Vimy formation based under I Bavarian Reserve Corps commander General der Infanterie Karl von Fasbender. ⇒ドイツ軍の第6方面軍指揮官ルートヴィヒ・フォン・ファルケンハウゼン将軍は、キャンブレ‐リーユ地区に対する責任者であり、20個の師団を指揮していた。ヴィミー・リッジそれ自体は、第Iバヴァリア(バイエルン)予備軍団の指揮官、カール・フォン・ファスベンダー歩兵隊将軍の指揮に基づいて特別に編成された「ヴィミー・グループ」によって防護されていた。

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