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So far as the Chamber was concerned, his success was complete. But the acceptance of a position in a bourgeois ministry led to his exclusion from the Unified Socialist Party (March 1906). As opposed to Jaurès, he contended that the Socialists should co-operate actively with the Radicals in all matters of reform, and not stand aloof to await the complete fulfillment of their ideals. He himself was atheist. He became a freemason in the lodge Le Trait d'Union in July 1887 while the lodge didn't record his name in spite of his repeated requests. The lodge declared "unworthy" to him on 6 September 1889. In 1895 he joined the lodge Les Chevaliers du Travail that was established in 1893. Briand served as Minister of Justice under Clemenceau in 1908-9, before succeeding Clemenceau as Prime Minister on 24 July 1909, serving until 2 March 1911. In social policy, Briand’s first ministry was notable for the passage of a bill in April 1910 for workers' and farmers' pensions.

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>So far as the Chamber was concerned, his success was complete. But the acceptance of a position in a bourgeois ministry led to his exclusion from the Unified Socialist Party (March 1906). As opposed to Jaurès, he contended that the Socialists should co-operate actively with the Radicals in all matters of reform, and not stand aloof to await the complete fulfillment of their ideals. He himself was atheist. ⇒議員に関する限り、彼の成功は完全であった。しかし、ブルジョワ的な省の職位への受け入れは、統一社会党からの彼の排除につながった(1906年3月)。ジョレスとは対照的に、彼は、社会党は改革のすべての問題について活発に過激派と協力しなければならなくて、理想の完全な達成を待ち構えるために(お互いが)離れていてはならない、と主張した。彼自身は、無神論者であった。 >He became a freemason in the lodge Le Trait d'Union in July 1887 while the lodge didn't record his name in spite of his repeated requests. The lodge declared "unworthy" to him on 6 September 1889. In 1895 he joined the lodge Les Chevaliers du Travail that was established in 1893. Briand served as Minister of Justice under Clemenceau in 1908-9, before succeeding Clemenceau as Prime Minister on 24 July 1909, serving until 2 March 1911. In social policy, Briand’s first ministry was notable for the passage of a bill in April 1910 for workers' and farmers' pensions. ⇒彼は、1887年7月に「ル・トレ・デュニオン(橋渡し)」の組合支部でフリーメーソン会員になったが、一方彼の度重なる要請にもかかわらず組合支部は彼の名前を記録しなかった。1889年9月6日、組合支部は彼に「ふさわしくない」と宣言した。1895年、彼は1893年に設立された「シュヴァリエ・デュ・トラヴァイ(労働の騎士)」に加わった。ブリアンは、1909年7月24日に首相としてクレマンソーの跡を継ぐ前に、1908-9年のクレマンソー政権下で法務大臣を勤め、そして、(首相の職務は)1911年3月2日まで勤めた。社会政策では、ブリアンの初めての首相としての職務では、1910年4月に労働者や農民の年金制度の請求を(国会を)通過させたことが顕著であった。

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