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英文翻訳をお願いします。

Since the 1860s, Luxembourgers had been keenly aware of German ambition, and Luxembourg's government was well aware of the implications of the Schlieffen Plan. In 1911, Prime Minister Paul Eyschen commissioned an engineer to evaluate Germany's western railroad network, particularly the likelihood that Germany would occupy Luxembourg to suit its logistical needs for a campaign in France. Moreover, given the strong ethnic and linguistic links between Luxembourg and Germany, it was feared that Germany might seek to annex Luxembourg into its empire. The government of Luxembourg aimed to avoid this by re-affirming the country's neutrality.

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以下のとおりお答えします。 ドイツの野心に対する、ルクセンブルクの警戒について述べています。 >Since the 1860s, Luxembourgers had been keenly aware of German ambition, and Luxembourg's government was well aware of the implications of the Schlieffen Plan. In 1911, Prime Minister Paul Eyschen commissioned an engineer to evaluate Germany's western railroad network, particularly the likelihood that Germany would occupy Luxembourg to suit its logistical needs for a campaign in France. ⇒1860年代以来、ルクセンブルク人はドイツの野心に目ざとく気づき、ルクセンブルク政府は「シュリーフェン計画」の意味を十分に気づいていた。1911年、ポール・アイシェン総理大臣は、ドイツの西部鉄道網を評価するよう、特にフランスでの野戦でその兵站学的な必要性を満たすためにドイツがルクセンブルクを占拠する可能性を評価する(見極める)よう、技師に委任した。 >Moreover, given the strong ethnic and linguistic links between Luxembourg and Germany, it was feared that Germany might seek to annex Luxembourg into its empire. The government of Luxembourg aimed to avoid this by re-affirming the country's neutrality. ⇒さらに、ルクセンブルクとドイツの間には強い民族的言語的なつながりがあることから、ドイツが、その帝国にルクセンブルクを併合しようとするかも知れないことが恐れられた。ルクセンブルク政府は、国の中立を再断言してこれを避けることをめざした。

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