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On the north bank, a dawn bombardment was followed by a German attack on the 11th Brigade front, where one battalion was spread along 2,000 yd (1,800 m) from Le Gheer to the Douve river. No continuous trenches existed and the isolated strongpoints had no communication trenches. Infantry Regiment 134 of the 40th Division began to overrun the battalion, until a counter-attack by the brigade reserve pushed the Germans back. An attack on 31 October, reached the British trenches again but the Germans retired before a counter-attack could be mounted. A battalion of the 12th Brigade from the 4th Division took over the right flank of the Cavalry Corps line, which brought the divisional front north to Messines During November, artillery-fire, sniping and local attacks continued south of the Lys and on 1 November, the Cavalry Corps was forced out of Messines, which left the northern flank of III Corps exposed, at a time when the corps was defending a 12 mi (19 km) front with severely depleted units. Few reserves were left and Pulteney reported to the BEF headquarters, that the corps could not withstand another big attack. French sent two battalions north from II Corps and gave permission for the corps to retreat to a reserve line from Fleurbaix to Nieppe and Neuve Eglise if necessary. The daily ration of artillery ammunition was doubled from forty rounds per day for each 18-pounder and twenty per day for each 4.5-inch howitzer, which enabled the 4th and 6th divisions to maintain their front. The Battle of Armentières ended officially on 2 November but north of the Lys, fighting in the 4th Division positions up to the Douve river continued and are described in the Battle of Messines (1914). The battles in French and Belgian Flanders were the last battles of encounter and manoeuvre on the Western front, until 1918. After the meeting engagements, the battles became a desperate defence by the British, French and Belgian armies against the offensives of the German 6th and 4th armies. No defensive system like those built in 1915 existed and both sides improvised shelter pits and short lengths of trench, which were repaired each night. Artillery was concealed by ground features only but the small number of observation aircraft on both sides and the extent of tree cover, enabled guns to remain hidden. The attack by the 6th Army on 21 October, from La Bassée to St Yves by the VII, XIII and XIX corps achieved only small advances against the 6th Division and the XIX Corps attack on the 4th Division front gained no ground but the attacks put great strain on the British defence and prevented reserves from being transferred north to Ypres. British artillery adopted the French practice of night artillery fire on German communication routes, as far as 6-inch gun ammunition allowed.

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>On the north bank, a dawn bombardment was followed by a German attack on the 11th Brigade front, where one battalion was spread along 2,000 yd (1,800 m) from Le Gheer to the Douve river. No continuous trenches existed and the isolated strongpoints had no communication trenches. Infantry Regiment 134 of the 40th Division began to overrun the battalion, until a counter-attack by the brigade reserve pushed the Germans back. An attack on 31 October, reached the British trenches again but the Germans retired before a counter-attack could be mounted. A battalion of the 12th Brigade from the 4th Division took over the right flank of the Cavalry Corps line, which brought the divisional front north to Messines ⇒北岸では、夜明けの爆撃の後、第11旅団の前線に対するドイツ軍の攻撃が続き、そこでは1個の大隊がル・ゲールからドゥーブ川沿いに2,000ヤード(1,800 m)広がった。連続する塹壕が存在せず、隔離され孤立した強化地点には通信塹壕がなかった。第40師団の第134歩兵連隊が大隊を蹂躙し始め、旅団予備隊による反撃でドイツ軍が後退するまで続いた。10月31日の攻撃は再び英国軍の塹壕に達したが、反撃を起こす前にドイツ軍は退去した。第4師団から来た第12旅団の1個大隊が騎兵隊戦線の右側面を奪取し、メシーヌ北の師団前線まで伸びた。 >During November, artillery-fire, sniping and local attacks continued south of the Lys and on 1 November, the Cavalry Corps was forced out of Messines, which left the northern flank of III Corps exposed, at a time when the corps was defending a 12 mi (19 km) front with severely depleted units. Few reserves were left and Pulteney reported to the BEF headquarters, that the corps could not withstand another big attack. French sent two battalions north from II Corps and gave permission for the corps to retreat to a reserve line from Fleurbaix to Nieppe and Neuve Eglise if necessary. ⇒11月の間、リィスの南で砲撃、狙撃、および局地の攻撃が続く。11月1日、騎兵軍団が極度に枯渇した部隊とともに12 マイル(19キロ)の前線を警護していたが、そのとき一斉にメシーヌから追放された。残っている予備隊兵員はほとんどなく、プルトニーは、別の大きな攻撃があれば軍団は耐えることができないことをBEF本部に報告した。フランス軍は第II軍団から2個大隊を北に派遣したが、もし必要ある場合には軍団がフルールベーからニエップとヌーヴ・エグリーズへ予備軍戦線まで退却することを許可した。 >The daily ration of artillery ammunition was doubled from forty rounds per day for each 18-pounder and twenty per day for each 4.5-inch howitzer, which enabled the 4th and 6th divisions to maintain their front. The Battle of Armentières ended officially on 2 November but north of the Lys, fighting in the 4th Division positions up to the Douve river continued and are described in the Battle of Messines (1914). The battles in French and Belgian Flanders were the last battles of encounter and manoeuvre on the Western front, until 1918. After the meeting engagements, the battles became a desperate defence by the British, French and Belgian armies against the offensives of the German 6th and 4th armies. ⇒砲弾の1日当たりの配給量は、18型ポンド砲で1門ごとに1日40発、4.5インチ榴弾砲で1門ごとに1日20発であったものが、それぞれ2倍になったので、それで第4、第6師団は前線を維持することができた。「アルマンティエールの戦い」は11月2日に正式に終了したが、リィスの北、ドゥーブ川まで続く第4師団の陣地での戦いは続き、「メシーヌの戦い」(1914年)でようやく形勢が判明してくる。フランス・ベルギーのフランドルでの戦いは、1918年まで西部前線での対戦と機動戦の連続であった。会戦・交戦の後、戦いは英国、フランス、ベルギーの各軍隊にとってドイツ第6、第4方面軍の攻撃に対する絶望的な防御戦となった。 >No defensive system like those built in 1915 existed and both sides improvised shelter pits and short lengths of trench, which were repaired each night. Artillery was concealed by ground features only but the small number of observation aircraft on both sides and the extent of tree cover, enabled guns to remain hidden. The attack by the 6th Army on 21 October, from La Bassée to St Yves by the VII, XIII and XIX corps achieved only small advances against the 6th Division and the XIX Corps attack on the 4th Division front gained no ground but the attacks put great strain on the British defence and prevented reserves from being transferred north to Ypres. British artillery adopted the French practice of night artillery fire on German communication routes, as far as 6-inch gun ammunition allowed. ⇒(当時は)1915年に建造された防衛システムに適うようなものは存在せず、両陣営とも避難用窪地と短い塹壕を即席で造って毎晩のように修繕していた。砲兵は地面の特徴のみを利用して隠れたが、両陣営のわずかな観測航空機と樹木の覆いの広さによって、銃砲を隠しておくことができたにすぎない。10月21日、対第6方面軍の、ラ・バセからサン・イヴにわたる第VII、第XIII、第XIX軍団の攻撃ではわずかな前進しか達成されず、第4師団戦線への第XIX軍団の攻撃では地面の獲得は無かったが、これらの攻撃は(少なくとも)英国軍の防衛隊をいためつけ、予備隊が北のイープルに移されるのを防いだ。英国軍砲兵隊は、ドイツ軍の通信ルートに対して、6インチ砲弾が許す範囲でフランス式の夜間砲撃を実施した。

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