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Before it fell into ruin Stonehenge must have had much of the grandeur of an Egyptian temple, which, despite its circu-iar shape, in some ways it resembles, and that it was temple there can be little doubt. Surrounded by a ditch and bank, it stood, as it were, upon a plinth, complete, classical in its iso-lation, and Neolithic worshippers on its perimeter would watch the procession of priests about the ambulatory, and the great trilithons. It would be not unlike watching the performance of a play, and perhaps Stonehenge is the prototype of the 'round' in which medieval miracle plays were presented, and ultimately of the ’wooden O' for which Shakespeare wrote.

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  • Nakay702
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以下のとおりお答えします。 (訳文) ストーンヘンジは、荒廃する前には荘厳なエジプト寺院とそっくりだったに違いない。それは、より丸みのある形状*だったにもかかわらず、どこか似たところがあるので、それが(一種の)寺院であったことは、ほぼ疑いのないところである。 *circu-iar はcircularの誤植とみなして訳しました。 溝や土手に囲まれて、それは礎石(台座)の上に、いわば昔ながらの完全な孤立建築(の姿で)立っていた。その境内では、新石器時代の崇拝者たちが、回廊や大トリリソン(三柱、2本の立石上に1石を載せた石組)の周りで、司祭たちの祈り(の儀式)を見ていたことであろう。 それは、演劇のパフォーマンスを見るのに似ていなくもなかっただろう。そして、おそらくストーンヘンジは、中世の奇跡劇が演じられた「ラウンド」(半円の野外劇場)の原型であった。それは、後にシェイクスピアが 'wooden O'「樹木のO」として描いた。

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    The early speculator was harassed by no such scruples, and asserted as facts what he knew in reality only as probabilities. But we are not on that account to doubt his perfect good faith, nor need we attribute to him wilful misrepresentation, or consciousness of asserting that which he knew not to be true. He had seized one great truth, in which, indeed, he anticipated the highest revelation of modern enquiry -- namely, the unity of the design of the world, and its subordination to one sole Maker and Lawgiver. With regard to details, observation failed him. He knew little of the earth's surface, or of its shape and place in the universe; the infinite varieties of organized existences which people it, the distinct floras and faunas of its different continents, were unknown to him. But he saw that all which lay within his observation bad been formed for the benefit and service of man, and the goodness of the Creator to his creatures was the thought predominant in his mind. Man's closer relations to his Maker is indicated by the representation that he was formed last of all creatures, and in the visible likeness of God. For ages, this simple view of creation satisfied the wants of man, and formed a sufficient basis of theological teaching, and if modern research now shows it to be physically untenable, our respect for the narrative which has played so important a part in the culture of our race need be in nowise diminished. No one contends that it can be used as a basis of astronomical or geological teaching, and those who profess to see in it an accordance with facts, only do this sub modo, and by processes which despoil it of its consistency and grandeur, both which may be preserved if we recognise in it, not an authentic utterance of Divine knowledge, but a human utterance, which it has pleased Providence to use Providence a special way for the education of mankind.

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  • 回答No.3
noname#232424
noname#232424

いや。前の質問文にもありましたが,行末で単語が途中で切れ,「-」で次行につないであるのを,そのまんま書き写したんでしょ。高校教科書ではそんな組み方はしませんが,専門書や論文にはふつうにある。そんなところでも,「ああ,この質問者は英文をあんまり読んでないねえ。大学の課題をカンニングしてんだろ?」とわかっちゃうの(笑)。

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  • 回答No.1
noname#232424
noname#232424

うん。ぼくが https://okwave.jp/qa/q9506944.html で書いたように,やっぱりストーンヘンジだったね。環状列石だとはわかったけれども,特定できるかどうか気になってたんだ(笑)。 斜め読みして「アレかな?」と思い当たるだけの基礎知識がないと,こういう科学英文はわからないよ。

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