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In 2007 Sheldon gave 22,988 casualties for the German 4th Army from 1–10 June 1917. At 3:00 a.m. on 8 June, the British attack to regain the Oosttaverne line from the river Douve to the Warneton road found few German garrisons as it was occupied. German artillery south of the Lys, heavily bombarded the southern slopes of the ridge and caused considerable losses among Anzac troops pinned there. Ignorance of the situation north of the Warneton road continued; a reserve battalion was sent to reinforce the 49th Australian Battalion near the Blauwepoortbeek for the 3:00 a.m. attack, which did not take place. The 4th Australian Division commander, Major-General William Holmes, went forward at 4:00 a.m. and finally clarified the situation. New orders instructed the 33rd Brigade (11th Division) to side-step to the right and relieve the 52nd Australian Battalion, which at dusk would move to the south and join the 49th Australian Battalion for the attack into the gap at the Blauwepoortbeek. All went well until observers on the ridge saw the 52nd Australian Battalion withdrawing, mistook it for a German counter-attack and called for an SOS bombardment. German observers in the valley saw troops from the 33rd Brigade moving into the area to relieve the Australian battalion, mistook them for an attacking force and also called for an SOS bombardment. The area was deluged with artillery fire from both sides for two hours, causing many casualties and the attack was postponed until 9 June. Confusion had been caused by the original attacking divisions on the ridge, having control over the artillery which covered the area occupied by the reserve divisions down the eastern slope. The arrangement had been intended to protect the ridge from large German counter-attacks, which might force the reserve divisions back up the slope.

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>In 2007 Sheldon gave 22,988 casualties for the German 4th Army from 1–10 June 1917. At 3:00 a.m. on 8 June, the British attack to regain the Oosttaverne line from the river Douve to the Warneton road found few German garrisons as it was occupied. German artillery south of the Lys, heavily bombarded the southern slopes of the ridge and caused considerable losses among Anzac troops pinned there. ⇒2007年に、シェルドンは1917年6月1-10日のドイツ第4方面軍の犠牲者として22,988人をあげた。6月8日午前3時に、ドゥーヴ川からヴァルネトン道にわたるオースタフェルネ戦線を奪還するための英国軍の攻撃にとって、戦線が占拠されているのにほとんどドイツ駐屯軍が見当たらなかった。リース南のドイツ軍砲兵隊は、尾根の南傾斜を激しく砲撃して、そこにクギづけされたアンザック兵部隊の間にかなりの損失を与えた。 >Ignorance of the situation north of the Warneton road continued; a reserve battalion was sent to reinforce the 49th Australian Battalion near the Blauwepoortbeek for the 3:00 a.m. attack, which did not take place. The 4th Australian Division commander, Major-General William Holmes, went forward at 4:00 a.m. and finally clarified the situation. New orders instructed the 33rd Brigade (11th Division) to side-step to the right and relieve the 52nd Australian Battalion, which at dusk would move to the south and join the 49th Australian Battalion for the attack into the gap at the Blauwepoortbeek. ⇒ヴァルネトン道北で続く状況に関する不案内のために、1個予備大隊が午前3時の攻撃のためにブラウヴェポールツベーク近くの第49オーストラリア大隊を補強するために送られたが、その攻撃は起こらなかった。第4オーストラリア師団の指揮官ウィリアム・ホームズ少将が、午前4時に前進していって、ようやく状況をはっきりさせた。第33旅団(第11師団)に対して、右へ旋回して第52オーストラリア軍大隊を救援するようにという新しい命令が下されたので、旅団は夕暮れどきに南へ移って、ブラウヴェポールツベークの隙間に対する攻撃のために第49オーストラリア大隊に合流することとなった。 >All went well until observers on the ridge saw the 52nd Australian Battalion withdrawing, mistook it for a German counter-attack and called for an SOS bombardment. German observers in the valley saw troops from the 33rd Brigade moving into the area to relieve the Australian battalion, mistook them for an attacking force and also called for an SOS bombardment. The area was deluged with artillery fire from both sides for two hours, causing many casualties and the attack was postponed until 9 June. ⇒第52オーストラリア軍大隊が撤退していくのを見て、尾根上の観察隊がそれをドイツの反撃と間違えてSOS爆撃を要求するまで、すべてはうまくいっていた。渓谷のドイツ軍観察隊は、第33旅団からの軍隊がオーストラリア軍大隊を救援するために地域へ移動するのを見て、彼らを攻撃隊と間違えてSOS爆撃を要求した。地域は2時間の間両側からの大砲砲火であふれて多くの犠牲者を引き起こしたので、(歩兵隊の)攻撃は6月9日まで延期された。 >Confusion had been caused by the original attacking divisions on the ridge, having control over the artillery which covered the area occupied by the reserve divisions down the eastern slope. The arrangement had been intended to protect the ridge from large German counter-attacks, which might force the reserve divisions back up the slope. ⇒尾根上の最初の(開戦用の)攻撃をする師団によって混乱が引き起こされて、東斜面の下で予備師団が占拠している地域を掩護する砲兵隊に影響した。予備師団を斜面の上へ押し戻すかもしれなかったが、大規模なドイツの反撃から尾根を保護することを目的として話し合いがなされた。 ※全体的に状況がいまいち掴みきれません。誤訳の節はどうぞ悪しからず。

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