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In addition, only half of the available artillery was committed at any one point in time with the intensity of the barrage expressly varied as to confuse the Germans and preserve some level of secrecy. Phase two lasted the entire week beginning 2 April 1917 and employed the entire artillery arsenal at the disposal of the Canadian Corps, massing the equivalent of one heavy gun for every 18 metres (20 yd) and one field gun for every 9.1 metres (10 yd). The German soldiers came to refer to the week before the attack as 'the week of suffering'. By the Germans' own account, their trenches and defensive works were almost completely demolished. Furthermore, German health and morale suffered from the stress of remaining at the ready for eleven straight days under extremely heavy artillery bombardment. Compounding German difficulties was the inability of ration parties to bring food supplies to the front lines. On 3 April, General von Falkenhausen ordered his reserve divisions to prepare to relieve frontline divisions over the course of a long drawn-out defensive battle, in a manner similar to the Battle of the Somme. However, the divisions were kept 24 kilometres (15 mi) from the battlefield to avoid being shelled.

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>In addition, only half of the available artillery was committed at any one point in time with the intensity of the barrage expressly varied as to confuse the Germans and preserve some level of secrecy. Phase two lasted the entire week beginning 2 April 1917 and employed the entire artillery arsenal at the disposal of the Canadian Corps, massing the equivalent of one heavy gun for every 18 metres (20 yd) and one field gun for every 9.1 metres (10 yd). ⇒その上、数レベルにもわたる機密を保持しつつドイツ軍を混乱させるための、多様かつ変化の激しい集中砲火への徹底について、いかなる点からも適時(の対応)を委ねられるのは、都合のつく砲兵隊のうちの半分のみであった。(攻撃の)第2段階が1917年4月2日に始まって丸1週間続き、全軍需工場の大砲兵器をカナダ軍団の処置にまかせて使用し、18メートル(20ヤード)ごとに1門の大型重砲、9.1メートル(10ヤード)ごとに1門の野戦砲の相当分を結集した。 ※すみませんが、この段落(特に冒頭)はよく分かりません。誤訳の節はお許しください。 >The German soldiers came to refer to the week before the attack as 'the week of suffering'. By the Germans' own account, their trenches and defensive works were almost completely demolished. Furthermore, German health and morale suffered from the stress of remaining at the ready for eleven straight days under extremely heavy artillery bombardment. ⇒ドイツ軍兵士は、攻撃前の週を「受難週間」と表すに至った。ドイツ軍自身の演出(仕留め)によって、彼らの塹壕と防御の労作が、ほとんど完全に破壊された。さらにまた、極めてつらい砲撃砲弾の下に11日間連続で準備状態を維持して(位置について)いて、ドイツ軍の健康と士気はそのストレスに苦しんだ。 >Compounding German difficulties was the inability of ration parties to bring food supplies to the front lines. On 3 April, General von Falkenhausen ordered his reserve divisions to prepare to relieve frontline divisions over the course of a long drawn-out defensive battle, in a manner similar to the Battle of the Somme. However, the divisions were kept 24 kilometres (15 mi) from the battlefield to avoid being shelled. ⇒ドイツ軍の困難を倍加させたのは、最前線への割当て供給の関係者が、食料を給配できないことであった。4月3日、フォン・ファルケンハウゼン将軍は、彼の予備師団に「ソンムの戦い」と似た手法で、延々と続く防御戦中にある前線師団の救援準備をするよう命令した。しかし師団は、被弾を避けるために戦場から24キロ(15マイル)地点に駐留した。

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