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The main influence of air operations was exerted through message-carrying and reconnaissance, particularly in observing ground conditions in front of the advance and intermittent co-operation with artillery. Distant reconnaissance, some by single-seat fighters, found no evidence of German defences beyond the Hindenburg Line but many new aerodromes and supply dumps, indicating the permanence of the new position. The success of the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line has been explained as an Allied failure to anticipate the retirement and in being unable seriously to impede it. Another view is that the Anglo-French were not pursuing a broken enemy but an army making a deliberate withdrawal after months of preparation, which retained considerable powers of manoeuvre and counter-attack.

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>The main influence of air operations was exerted through message-carrying and reconnaissance, particularly in observing ground conditions in front of the advance and intermittent co-operation with artillery. Distant reconnaissance, some by single-seat fighters, found no evidence of German defences beyond the Hindenburg Line but many new aerodromes and supply dumps, indicating the permanence of the new position. ⇒空中作戦の主要な影響は、メッセージの伝達と斥候調査を通じて、特に、進軍先の前線の地上状況を観察、および砲兵隊との断続的な協力関係を通じて及ぼされた。遠くの斥候調査隊は、機種によっては一人乗りの戦闘機であったが、それらがヒンデンブルク戦線を越えてはドイツ防衛軍の証拠を見つけることはなかったが、多くの新しい飛行場や供給集積場を発見して、新しい陣地の耐久力を指示した。 >The success of the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line has been explained as an Allied failure to anticipate the retirement and in being unable seriously to impede it. Another view is that the Anglo-French were not pursuing a broken enemy but an army making a deliberate withdrawal after months of preparation, which retained considerable powers of manoeuvre and counter-attack. ⇒ヒンデンブルク戦線へのドイツ軍の撤退の成功は、退去を予想することに関する連合国軍の失敗で、それを厳しく阻止することができなかったからであるとして説明された。もう一つの見方は、英仏軍は、敗れた敵を追跡することをしなかったので、その(敗れた)方面軍が、慎重な撤退をして数か月に及ぶ準備の後に、機動作戦や反撃のためのかなりの軍力を再保持したからである、としている。

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