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In the early afternoon a German counter-attack at the junction of the Entente armies on the Steenbeek was repulsed. The position gained by the French was not easily defensible, consisting of craters half-full of water, which dissolved into rivulets when connected. Contact with the rear was difficult to maintain over the moonscape of shell-holes, many of them wide and of great depth but the French infantry had been issued supplies for four days to minimise the difficulty. The German 2nd Guard Reserve Division advanced through Houthoulst Forest towards the junction of the Fifth and French First armies but the attack bogged down in deep mud. A prisoner said that in his company of about 150 men, barely fifty reached attacking distance and most of those took cover in shell-holes. The first four days of August were exceptionally rainy, which added to the difficulty of maintaining troops in the ground captured on 31 July. On 4 August despite the mud, the First Army advanced east of Kortekeer Kabaret and took two farms west of the road from Woumen to Steenstraat. On 26 July 37 British fighters engaged fifty Albatros scouts near Polygon Wood. During the mêlée, four German reconnaissance aircraft were able to slip over the line and reconnoitre. Next evening eight British aircraft over Menin lured about twenty Albatros scouts to Polygon Wood, where 59 British fighters were waiting. Allied and German aircraft in the vicinity joined in the dogfight and after an hour the surviving German aircraft withdrew. The British decoys shot down six German aircraft and the ambushers another three while the British lost two aircraft. On 27 July a British reconnaissance aircraft detected an apparent German tactical withdrawal, which enabled XIV Corps to occupy 3,000 yards (2,700 m) of the German front line. Next day the fine weather allowed the British to conduct a large amount of air observation for counter-battery fire and to detect numerous German batteries which had been moved. By 31 July, the Allied air concentration from the Lys River to the sea consisted of 840 aircraft, 330 being fighter aircraft.

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>In the early afternoon a German counter-attack at the junction of the Entente armies on the Steenbeek was repulsed. The position gained by the French was not easily defensible, consisting of craters half-full of water, which dissolved into rivulets when connected. Contact with the rear was difficult to maintain over the moonscape of shell-holes, many of them wide and of great depth but the French infantry had been issued supplies for four days to minimise the difficulty. ⇒昼過ぎに、ドイツ軍の反撃がシュテーンベークにおける協商国軍との接合地点で撃退された。フランス軍が獲得した陣地は、くぼみ半分まで水でいっぱいの流弾痕から成っていて、簡単に防御できるようなところではなかった。流弾痕がつながると、泥水の細い流れになった。月面上のあばたのように、流弾痕の多くが広く深いので、後衛部との接触を維持するのは困難であったが、しかしフランス歩兵連隊は困難を最小限にすべく、4日間の必需品配給が出された。 >The German 2nd Guard Reserve Division advanced through Houthoulst Forest towards the junction of the Fifth and French First armies but the attack bogged down in deep mud. A prisoner said that in his company of about 150 men, barely fifty reached attacking distance and most of those took cover in shell-holes. The first four days of August were exceptionally rainy, which added to the difficulty of maintaining troops in the ground captured on 31 July. On 4 August despite the mud, the First Army advanced east of Kortekeer Kabaret and took two farms west of the road from Woumen to Steenstraat. ⇒ドイツ軍の第2護衛予備師団はフーツールスト森林を通って、第5方面軍とフランス第1方面軍との交差ち点の方へ進んだが、攻撃隊は深い泥の中で動きが取れなかった。兵士約150人の中隊のある囚人の話では、かろうじて50人が攻撃距離に達したが、その多くが流弾痕に隠れたという。8月の最初の4日間は例外的に雨だったので、それで7月31日に占領した地面で軍隊を維持することがさらに困難になった。この泥にもかかわらず、8月4日、第1方面軍はコルテケール・カバレット東を進軍して、ウーメンからシュテーンシュトラートに至る道の西で2つの農場を奪取した。 >On 26 July 37 British fighters engaged fifty Albatros scouts near Polygon Wood. During the mêlée, four German reconnaissance aircraft were able to slip over the line and reconnoitre. Next evening eight British aircraft over Menin lured about twenty Albatros scouts to Polygon Wood, where 59 British fighters were waiting. Allied and German aircraft in the vicinity joined in the dogfight and after an hour the surviving German aircraft withdrew. The British decoys shot down six German aircraft and the ambushers another three while the British lost two aircraft. ⇒7月26日、ポリゴン森の近くで37機の英国軍戦闘隊が50機のアルバトロス偵察飛行隊と交戦した。混戦の間、4機のドイツ軍の斥候調査航空機が戦線上にすべり込んで、偵察することができた。翌日の夕方、メニン上空で8機の英国軍航空機が、およそ20機のアルバトロス偵察飛行隊をポリゴン森に誘い込んだが、そこには59機の英国軍戦闘機が待っていた。連合国軍とドイツ軍の航空機が激しい戦闘にもつれ込んで、1時間後、生き残ったドイツ軍航空機は退散した。英国軍が2機の航空機を失う間、英国軍のおとり機が6機のドイツ軍航空機を撃ち落し、伏兵機がもう3機を撃ち落した。 >On 27 July a British reconnaissance aircraft detected an apparent German tactical withdrawal, which enabled XIV Corps to occupy 3,000 yards (2,700 m) of the German front line. Next day the fine weather allowed the British to conduct a large amount of air observation for counter-battery fire and to detect numerous German batteries which had been moved. By 31 July, the Allied air concentration from the Lys River to the sea consisted of 840 aircraft, 330 being fighter aircraft. ⇒7月27日に、英国軍の調査航空機は明らかなドイツ軍の戦術的撤退先を見届けたことで、第XIV軍団がドイツの最前線の3,000ヤード(2,700m)を占拠することが可能となった。次の日、晴天のおかげで、英国軍が反砲兵隊砲火のために大量の航空観察隊を指揮して、移動した多数のドイツ軍砲兵隊を見つけることができた。7月31日までには、リース川から海にかけての連合国軍の航空機集中域は840機の航空機から成っていて、そのうちの330機が戦闘航空機であった。

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    German tunnellers came within metres of several British mine chambers, found the mine at La Petite Douve Farm and wrecked the chamber with a camouflet. The British diverted the attention of German miners from their deepest galleries, by making many secondary attacks in the upper levels. Co-ordinated by tunnelling companies of the Royal Engineers, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and British miners laid 26 mines with 447 long tons (454 t) of ammonal explosive. The British knew of the importance the Germans placed on holding the Wijtschate salient, after a captured corps order from Gruppe Wijtschate stating "that the salient be held at all costs" was received by Haig on 1 June. In the week before the attack, 2,230 guns and howitzers bombarded the German trenches, cut wire, destroyed strong-points and conducted counter-battery fire against 630 German artillery pieces, using 3,561,530 shells. In May, the 4th Australian, 11th and 24th divisions were moved north from Arras, to become reserve divisions for those corps in the Second Army which were preparing to attack Messines Ridge. Seventy-two of the new Mark IV tanks also arrived in May and were hidden south-west of Ypres. British aircraft began to move north from the Arras front, the total rising to about 300 operational aircraft in II Brigade in the Second Army area. The mass of artillery to be used in the attack was supported by many artillery observation and photographic reconnaissance aircraft, in corps squadrons which had been increased from twelve to eighteen aircraft. Strict enforcement of wireless procedures allowed a reduction of the minimum distance between observation aircraft from 1,000 yards (910 m) at Arras in April 1917 to 400 yards (370 m) at Messines, without mutual wireless interference.

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