• ベストアンサー
  • 困ってます

The Dark Glassesから

Coming to the edge of the lake we paused to look at our reflections in the water. It was then I recognized her from the past, her face looking up from the lake. She had not stopped talking.  I put on my dark glasses to shield my eyes from the sun and conceal my recognition from her eyes.  "Am I boring you?" she said.  "No, not a bit, Dr Gray."  "Sure?"  It is discouraging to put on sun-glasses in the middle of someone's intimate story. But they were necessary, now that I had recognized her, and was excited, and could only honourably hear what she had to say from a point of concealment. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 ●It was then I recognized her from the past, her face looking up from the lake. her faceは I recognized her face looking up from the lakeという繋がりですか? ●and could only honourably hear what she had to say from a point of concealment. ここの意味がよくわかりません。 隠蔽のポイントから彼女が言う必要があることを見事に聞くことができるだけでした? どういうことを言っているのでしょうか? from a point of concealmentは直前のsayにかかるのでしょうか? それともhearですか? 教えてください。お願いいたします。

共感・応援の気持ちを伝えよう!

  • 回答数2
  • 閲覧数165
  • ありがとう数4

質問者が選んだベストアンサー

  • ベストアンサー
  • 回答No.1
noname#238819

It was then I recognized her from the past, her face looking up from the lake. 意訳。 過去記憶との照合で彼女とわかったのは、彼女の顔が湖からみあげていたそのときだった。 独立分詞構文というやつです。 her faceをいれずに、looking up ~ とやってしまうと 、looking upしたのが I( 私)になっちゃう。ソレじゃためだから、意味上の主語として、her faceがきている。 But they were necessary, now that I had recognized her, and was excited, and could only honourably hear what she had to say from a point of concealment. 意訳。 サングラス(they)はつけるほかなかった。いまや彼女がだれかわかって、興奮していたし、隠れてようやく彼女の言いたいことをきける有り様だったからだ。 ちなみに what she had to say は 「なければならない」ではないです。 She had somthing to say. を関係詞化したものです。 from a point of concealmentはhearにかかります。

共感・感謝の気持ちを伝えよう!

質問者からのお礼

her face looking up from the lakeのところは独立分詞構文だったのですね。 what she had to sayのところの元の形を教えて頂いて勉強になりました。 意訳していただいてfrom a point of concealmentがhearにかかることがわかりました。 ありがとうございます!

関連するQ&A

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    "I took up psychology during the war. Up till then I was in general practice." I had come to the summer school to lecture on history and she on psychology. Psychiatrists are very often ready to talk to strangers about their inmost lives. This is probably because they spend so much time hearing out their patients. I did not recognize Dr Gray, except as a type, when I had attended her first lecture on "the psychic manifestations of sex." She spoke of child-poltergeists, and I was bored, and took refuge in observing the curious language of her profession. I noticed the word "arousement". "Adolescents in a state of sexual arousement," she said, "may become possessed of almost psychic insight." Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンが続いていましたが、ここから現代に戻ります。 主人公とDr Grayが湖の近くを一緒に歩いて話しています。 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- ● I did not recognize Dr Gray, except as a typeの個所はどういう意味でしょうか? typeは典型ですか? 教えてください。よろしくお願いします。 以下は物語の冒頭の部分です。この場面に戻ってきています。 Coming to the edge of the lake we paused to look at our reflections in the water. It was then I recognized her from the past, her face looking up from the lake. She had not stopped talking.  I put on my dark glasses to shield my eyes from the sun and conceal my recognition from her eyes.  "Am I boring you?" she said.  "No, not a bit, Dr Gray."  "Sure?"  It is discouraging to put on sun-glasses in the middle of someone's intimate story. But they were necessary, now that I had recognized her, and was excited, and could only honourably hear what she had to say from a point of concealment.

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    I had my glasses on again, and was walking on. "How did your husband react to his sister's accusations?" I said. "He was remarkably kind." "Kind?" "Oh, yes, in the circumstances. Because she started up a lot of gossip in the neighbourhood. It was only a small town. It was a long time before I could persuade him to send her to a home for the blind where she could be looked after. There was a terrible bond between them. Unconscious incest." "Didn't you know that when you married him? I should have thought it would have been obvious." She looked at me again. "I had not studied psychology at that time," she said. I thought, neither had I. We were silent for the third turn about the lake. Then she said, "Well, I was telling you how I came to study psychology and practise it. My husband had this breakdown after his sister went away. He had delusions. He kept imagining he saw eyes looking at him everywhere. He still sees them from time to time. But eyes, you see. That's significant. Unconsciously he felt he had blinded his sister. Because unconsciously he wanted to do so. He keeps confessing that he did so." Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンから現代に戻って、主人公とDr Grayが湖のまわりを一緒に歩きながら話している場面です。 ********************************************* 最後の方に He kept imagining he saw eyes looking at him everywhere. He still sees them from time to time. But eyes, you see. とあるのですが、 But eyes, you see.のButはどういう意味になって、この一文はどう訳すのでしょうか? 教えてください。よろしくお願いします。 前文は "It can all be explained psychologically, as we've tried to show to my husband. We've told him and told him, and given him every sort of treatment--shock, insulin, everything. And after all, the stuff didn't have any effect on his sister immediately, and when she did go blind it was caused by acute glaucoma. She would probably have lost her sight in any case. Well, she went off her head completely and accused her brother of having put the wrong drug in the bottle deliberately. This is the interesting part from the psychological point of view--she said she had seen something that he didn't want her to see, something disreputable. She said he wanted to blind the eye that saw it. She said...." We were walking round the lake for the second time. When we came to the spot where I had seen her face reflected I stopped and looked over the water. "I'm boring you." "No, no." "I wish you would take off those glasses." I took them off for a moment. I rather liked her for her innocence in not recognizing me, though she looked hard and said, "There's a subconscious reason why you wear them." "Dark glasses hide dark thoughts," I said. "Is that a saying?" "Not that I've heard. But it is one now." She looked at me anew. But she didn't recognize me. These fishers of the mind have no eye for outward things. Instead, she was "recognizing" my mind:I already came under some category of hers. となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    He pulled a sheet of blotting paper towards him. He dipped his pen in the ink and started writing on the bottom of the sheet of paper before him, comparing it from time to time with the one he had taken out of the safe. I was not surprised, but I was thrilled, when the door behind him slowly opened. It was like seeing the film of the book. Dorothy advanced on her creeping feet, and he did not hear, but formed the words he was writing, on and on. The rain pelted down regardless. She was looking crookedly, through her green glasses with her one eye, over his shoulder at the paper. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 主人公は15歳ぐらいの女の子です。 he=検眼士です。 Dorothyは検眼士の姉です。 窓の外から主人公が検眼士の様子を窺っている場面です。 ----------------------------------------------- ●It was like seeing the film of the book.のthe film of the bookのところがわかりません。 "本の映像"ですか? the bookと定冠詞がついているのも気になります。ここでa bookとしていないのはなぜなのでしょうか? ●She was looking crookedly, through her green glasses with her one eye, over his shoulder at the paper.について、この英文はShe was looking at the paperという繋がりになるのでしょうか? 前文は Then he took up the pen. I can still smell the rain and hear it thundering about me, and feel it dripping on my head from the bough hanging above me. He raised his eyes and looked out at the rain. It seemed his eyes rested on me, at my station between the tree and the window. I kept still and close to the tree like a hunted piece of nature, willing myself to be the colour of bark and leaves and rain. Then I realized how much more clearly I could see him than he me, for it was growing dark. となっています。 教えてください。宜しくお願いします。

その他の回答 (1)

  • 回答No.2
  • SPS700
  • ベストアンサー率46% (14911/31768)

1。●It was then I recognized her from the past, her face looking up from the lake. her faceは I recognized her face looking up from the lakeという繋がりですか?  彼女が誰であるかに気づいた時、これが何時だったか、その答がこの文の要点です。  ですから水面に映った彼女の顔を、今までとは別の角度で見た時、「あ、彼女だ!」と気づいた、と言っています。 2。●and could only honourably hear what she had to say from a point of concealment. ここの意味がよくわかりません。  彼女の方は終止同じ彼と思って話を進めている。しかし彼の方は、話の途中で、彼女の前歴を知る人間に変わってしまった。  だから彼は、今までの無知な彼から、今や彼女の過去を知っ人間に変わった事を彼女に悟られないように隠さなければならない。 3。隠蔽のポイントから彼女が言う必要があることを見事に聞くことができるだけでした? どういうことを言っているのでしょうか?  だからサングラスで目を隠し、彼女の過去を知らない振りをして、彼女の話に聞き入る以外、紳士の名誉を保つ事は出来ない、という意味だと思います。 3。from a point of concealmentは直前のsayにかかるのでしょうか?  いいえ。 4。それともhearですか?  はい、おっしゃる通りです。 5。これだけでは二人の以前の関係が分かりませんが、彼女が以前の彼を批判するなら、別人でない事にして聞いておかないと honourably にならない訳です。

共感・感謝の気持ちを伝えよう!

質問者からのお礼

順を追って詳しいご解説をいただいて内容がよく掴めるようになりました。 ありがとうございます! 質問の英文は小説の冒頭部分なのですが、まだ二人の関係はわからないようにしている感じです。(ちなみに"I"は先を読むと女性のようです)

関連するQ&A

  • ask for her company

     "Must you wear those glasses?"  "Well, yes. The glare."  "The wearing of dark glasses," she said, "is a modern psychological phenomenon. It signifies the trend towards impersonalization, the weapon of the modern Inquisitor, it--"  "There's a lot in what you say." But I did not remove my glasses, for I had not asked for her company in the first place, and there is a limit to what one can listen to with the naked eye. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 (二人の女性が湖に歩いて来たところです) I had not asked for her company in the first placeの部分なのですが、 ここは、 私は第一に彼女に同伴することを求めなかった、でしょうか?(companyは動詞) それとも 私は第一に彼女の仲間(になること)を(自分自身に)求めなかった、でしょうか?(companyは名詞) どちらにもとれるのでしょうか? その場合は文脈から判断するのでしょうか? 前文は Coming to the edge of the lake we paused to look at our reflections in the water. It was then I recognized her from the past, her face looking up from the lake. She had not stopped talking.  I put on my dark glasses to shield my eyes from the sun and conceal my recognition from her eyes.  "Am I boring you?" she said.  "No, not a bit, Dr Gray."  "Sure?"  It is discouraging to put on sun-glasses in the middle of someone's intimate story. But they were necessary, now that I had recognized her, and was excited, and could only honourably hear what she had to say from a point of concealment. となっています。(前文の冒頭が物語の出だしになっています) 教えてください。お願い致します。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    After lunch, since the Eng. Lit. people had gone off to play tennis, she tacked on to me and we walked to the lake across the lawns, past the rhododendrons. This lake had once been the scene of a love-mad duchess's death. ".....during the war. Before that I was in general practice. It's strange," she said, "how I came to take up psychology. My second husband had a breakdown and was under a psychiatrist. Of course, he's incurable, but I decided.... It's strange, but that's how I came to take it up. It saved my reason. My husband is still in a home. His sister, of course, became quite incurable. He has his lucid moments. I did not realize it, of course, when I married, but there was what I'd now call an oedipus-transference on his part, and..." How tedious I found these phrases! We had come to the lake. I stooped over it and myself looked back at myself through the dark water. I looked at Dr Gray's reflection and recognized her. I put on my dark glasses, then. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンから現代に戻って、主人公とDr Grayが湖の近くを一緒に歩きながら話している場面です。 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- ●It's strange, " she said, "how I came to take up psychology.と It's strange, but that's how I came to take it up.の中に I came to take up psychologyと I came to take it upがありますが、前者はtake up psychologyとtake upが繋がっているのに、何故後者は take it upのように、take とupの間にitが入るのでしょうか? 教えてください。よろしくお願いします。 前文は "I took up psychology during the war. Up till then I was in general practice." I had come to the summer school to lecture on history and she on psychology. Psychiatrists are very often ready to talk to strangers about their inmost lives. This is probably because they spend so much time hearing out their patients. I did not recognize Dr Gray, except as a type, when I had attended her first lecture on "the psychic manifestations of sex." She spoke of child-poltergeists, and I was bored, and took refuge in observing the curious language of her profession. I noticed the word "arousement". "Adolescents in a state of sexual arousement," she said, "may become possessed of almost psychic insight." となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

     ”You're quite the young lady, Joan," he said, looking at my new breasts.   I smiled and put my hand in my blazer pocket.   He was smaller than he had been two years ago. I thought he must be about fifty or thirty. His face was more freckled than ever and his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paints. Miss Simmonds appeared silently in her soft slippers. "You're quite the young lady, Joan," she said from behind her green glasses, for her right eye had now gone blind and the other was said to be troubling her. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 he=Mr Simmondsは検眼士です。 13歳だった主人公の女の子が2年経って再びSimmondsさんのお店を訪れた場面です。 ----------------------------------- His face was more freckled than ever and his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paints.の his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paintsがわからないのですが、 as fromを辞書で引くと ・・・から(法律・契約など正式な日付に用いる)とありました。 この英文の場合には意味的に当てはまらない感じなのですが どのように訳すのでしょうか? 教えてください。宜しくお願いします。 前文は I broke the glasses by sitting on them during my school holidays two years later.   My grandmother said, after she had sighed, "It's time you had your eyes tested--" "--eyes tested in any case," said my aunt when she had sighed.   I washed my hair the night before and put a wave in it. Next morning at eleven I walked down to Mr Simmonds's with one of my grandmother's long hat-pins in my blazer pocket. The shop front had been done up, with gold lettering on the glass door: Basil Simmonds, Optician, followed by a string of letters which, so far as I remember, were FBOA, AIC, and others. となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

     "Can you read?" said Mr Simmonds.   I stopped looking round. I said, "Read what?"--for I had been told I would be asked to read row after row of letters. The card which hung beneath the dim light showed pictures of trains and animals.   "Because if you can't read we have pictures for illiterates."  This was Mr Simmonds' joke. I giggled. His sister smiled and dabbed her right eye with her handkerchief. She had been to London for an operation on her right eye.  I recall reading the letters correctly down to the last few lines, which were too small. I recall Mr Simmonds squeezing my arm as I left the shop, turning his sandy freckled face in a backward glance to see for certain that his sister was not watching. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 Mr Simmonds=検眼士です。 ーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーー ●row after row of lettersのところはどうやって読むのでしょうか? ●Mr Simmonds' jokeというのは、主人公の女の子が字が読めないなら、と言って(検眼のときに)文字ではなく絵を見せたことですか? 前文は I had seen Miss Simmonds once before, at a garden fete, where she stood on a platform in a big hat and blue dress, and sang "Sometimes between long shadows on the grass", while I picked up windfall apples, all of which seemed to be rotten. Now in her white overall she turned and gave me a hostile look, as if I had been seducing her brother. I felt sexually in the wrong, and started looking round the dark room with a wide-eyed air. となっています。 宜しくお願いします。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    "Am I boring you?" she said. "No, carry on." "Must you wear those glasses?....it is a modern psychological phenomenon....the trend towards impersonalization ...the modern Inquisitor." For a while, she watched her own footsteps as we walked round the lake. Then she continued her story. "...an optician. His sister was blind---going blind when I first attended her. Only the one eye was affected. Then there was an accident, one of those psychological accidents. She was a trained dispenser, but she mixed herself the wrong eye-drops. Now it's very difficult to make a mistake like that, normally. But subconsciously she wanted to, she wanted to. But she wasn't normal, she was not normal." "I'm not saying she was," I said. "What did you say?" "I'm sure she wasn't a normal person," I said, "if you say so." Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンから現代に戻って、主人公とDr Grayが湖の近くを一緒に歩きながら話している場面です。 ------------------------------------------------ ●"I'm not saying she was," I said.というセリフが出てくるのですが、 このセリフはDr Grayの話を今まで聞いていた主人公のセリフと思われます。 I'm not sayingとわざわざ現在進行形にしているところがわかりません。 またshe wasの後はshe was normalと続くのでしょうか? (「私は彼女はノーマルだったと言っていないところです」となるのでしょうか?) "What did you say?"とそのあとDr Grayが言っているので、何か変なことを主人公が言っている感じはするのですが。 教えてください。よろしくお願いします。 前文は After lunch, since the Eng. Lit. people had gone off to play tennis, she tacked on to me and we walked to the lake across the lawns, past the rhododendrons. This lake had once been the scene of a love-mad duchess's death. ".....during the war. Before that I was in general practice. It's strange," she said, "how I came to take up psychology. My second husband had a breakdown and was under a psychiatrist. Of course, he's incurable, but I decided.... It's strange, but that's how I came to take it up. It saved my reason. My husband is still in a home. His sister, of course, became quite incurable. He has his lucid moments. I did not realize it, of course, when I married, but there was what I'd now call an oedipus-transference on his part, and..." How tedious I found these phrases! We had come to the lake. I stooped over it and myself looked back at myself through the dark water. I looked at Dr Gray's reflection and recognized her. I put on my dark glasses, then. となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    She looked at me, then returned to attend to the person in the shop, leaving the intervening door wide open. She was back again almost immediately. My examination was soon over. Mr Simmonds saw me out at the front door and gave me pleading unhappy look. I felt like a traitor and I considered him horrible. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 Mr Simmondsは検眼士です。(she=Mr Simmondsの姉) 主人公は15歳ぐらいの女の子です。 --------------------------------- I felt like a traitor とあるのですがtraitorは”裏切り者”でしょうか? (horribleは”ひどく嫌な”?主人公がMr Simmondsをそう思うのはわかるのですが) なぜ主人公が自分のことをそのように感じたのかがわかりません。 前文は :(主人公が検眼にMr Simmondsのお店を訪れた場面です) You're quite the young lady, Joan," he said, looking at my new breasts.   I smiled and put my hand in my blazer pocket.   He was smaller than he had been two years ago. I thought he must be about fifty or thirty. His face was more freckled than ever and his eyes were flat blue as from a box of paints. Miss Simmonds appeared silently in her soft slippers. "You're quite the young lady, Joan," she said from behind her green glasses, for her right eye had now gone blind and the other was said to be troubling her. We went into the examination room. She glided past me and switched on the dim light above the letter card. I began to read out the letters while Basil Simmonds stood with folded hands. Someone came into the front shop. Miss Simmonds slid off to see who it was and her brother tickled my neck. I read on. He drew me towards him. I put my hand into my blazer pocket. He said, "Oh!" and sprang away as the hat-pin struck through my blazer and into his thigh.   Miss Simmonds appeared in the doorway in her avenging white overall. Her brother, who had been rubbing his thigh in a puzzled way, pretended to be dusting a mark off the front of his trousers. "What's wrong? Why did you shout?" she said. "No, I didn't shout." となっています。 教えてください。宜しくお願いします。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    "And attempted to forge the will?" I said. She stopped. "What are you saying?" "Does he admit that he tried to forge his mother's will?" "I haven't mentioned anything about a will." "Oh, I thought you had." "But, in fact, that was his sister's accusation. What made you say that? How did you know?" "I must be psychic, I said." She took my arm. I had become a most endearing case history. "You must be psychic indeed," she said. "You must tell me more about yourself. Well, that's the story of my taking up my present profession. When my husband started having these delusions and making these confessions I felt I had to understand the workings of the mind. And I began to study them. It has been fruitful. It has saved my own reason." "Did it ever occur to you that the sister's story might be true?" I said. "Especially as he admits it." She took away her arm and said, "Yes, I considered the possibility. I must admit I considered it well. She saw me watching her face. She looked as if she were pleading some personal excuse. "Oh do," she said, "please take off those glasses." "Why don't you believe his own confession?" "I'm a psychiatrist and we seldom believe confessions." She looked at her watch as if to suggest I had started the whole conversation and was boring her. I said, "He might have stopped seeing eyes if you'd taken him at his word." She shouted, "What are you saying? What are you thinking of? He wanted to give a statement to the police, do you realize...." "You know he's guilty," I said. "As his wife," she said, "I know he's guilty. But as a psychiatrist I must regard him as innocent. That's why I took up the subject." She suddenly turned angry and shouted, "You damned inquisitor, I've met your type before." I could hardly believe she was shouting, who previously had been so calm. "Oh, it's not my business," I said, and took off my glasses to show willing. I think it was then she recognized me. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 過去の回想シーンから現代に戻って、主人公とDr Grayが湖のまわりを一緒に歩きながら話している場面です。 ここでこの物語は終わりになります。 ***************************************************** As his wife," she said, I know he's guilty. But as a psychiatrist I must regard him as innocent. というDr Grayのセリフがあるのですが、 以前に Then there was an accident, one of those psychological accidents. She was a trained dispenser, but she mixed herself the wrong eye-drops. Now it's very difficult to make a mistake like that, normally. But subconsciously she wanted to, she wanted to. But she wasn't normal, she was not normal." とあって、姉は潜在的に盲目になりたくて点眼薬の調合を間違えたのだと思っていたのですが、 結局つまり、姉の点眼薬を別の劇薬にすり替えたのは弟(Dr Grayの夫)だったのか。 最後のオチがよくわからなくなってしまいました。 もしわかるようでしたら教えてください。お願いします。 (英語そのものの質問ではないのでここまで物語を読んでいただいていない方には質問の内容がわからなくて申し訳ないです。) 前文は I had my glasses on again, and was walking on. "How did your husband react to his sister's accusations?" I said. "He was remarkably kind." "Kind?" "Oh, yes, in the circumstances. Because she started up a lot of gossip in the neighbourhood. It was only a small town. It was a long time before I could persuade him to send her to a home for the blind where she could be looked after. There was a terrible bond between them. Unconscious incest." "Didn't you know that when you married him? I should have thought it would have been obvious." She looked at me again. "I had not studied psychology at that time," she said. I thought, neither had I. We were silent for the third turn about the lake. Then she said, "Well, I was telling you how I came to study psychology and practise it. My husband had this breakdown after his sister went away. He had delusions. He kept imagining he saw eyes looking at him everywhere. He still sees them from time to time. But eyes, you see. That's significant. Unconsciously he felt he had blinded his sister. Because unconsciously he wanted to do so. He keeps confessing that he did so." となっています。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    My grandmother said, "Did you see--" "--Mr Simmonds' sister?" said my aunt. "Yes, she was there all the time," I said, to make it definite. My grandmother said, "They say she's going---" "---blind in one eye," said my aunt. "And with the mother bedridden upstairs---" my grandmother said. "---she must be a saint," said my aunt. Presently--it may have been within a few days or a few weeks--my reading glasses arrived, and I wore them whenever I remembered to do so. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 (主人公は13歳の女の子です) Mr Simmonds=検眼士です。 ・ "---she must be a saint," (彼女は聖人であるに違いない?) このセリフはどういう意味ですか? sheはMr Simmonds' sisterのことですか? ☆"眼鏡をかける"、を英文にしたときwearとput onのどちらを使っても違いはないのでしょうか?よく使われるのはwearの方ですか? 前文は "Can you read?" said Mr Simmonds.   I stopped looking round. I said, "Read what?"--for I had been told I would be asked to read row after row of letters. The card which hung beneath the dim light showed pictures of trains and animals.   "Because if you can't read we have pictures for illiterates."  This was Mr Simmonds' joke. I giggled. His sister smiled and dabbed her right eye with her handkerchief. She had been to London for an operation on her right eye.  I recall reading the letters correctly down to the last few lines, which were too small. I recall Mr Simmonds squeezing my arm as I left the shop, turning his sandy freckled face in a backward glance to see for certain that his sister was not watching. となっています。 宜しくお願いします。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    I had seen Miss Simmonds once before, at a garden fete, where she stood on a platform in a big hat and blue dress, and sang "Sometimes between long shadows on the grass", while I picked up windfall apples, all of which seemed to be rotten. Now in her white overall she turned and gave me a hostile look, as if I had been seducing her brother. I felt sexually in the wrong, and started looking round the dark room with a wide-eyed air. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 ーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーー I felt sexually in the wrong, and started looking round the dark room with a wide-eyed air. ここの、 I felt sexually in the wrongとはどういう意味合いですか? in the wrongとはどういうことを言いたかったのでしょうか? (主人公の女の子は何も悪くはないと思うのですが) また、 and started looking round the dark room with a wide-eyed air.の個所の with a wide-eyed airという表現は(主人公の状態として)どんなことを表しているのでしょうか? 小説なので書いている表現を読み取るのが難しいのですが 教えていただけると幸いです。 前文は I was sent to have my eyes tested. He took me into the darkened interior and said, "Sit down, dear." He put his arm round my shoulder. His forefinger moved up and down on my neck. I was thirteen and didn't like to be rude to him. Dorothy Simmonds, his sister, came downstairs just then; she came upon us silently and dressed in a white overall. Before she had crossed the room to switch on a dim light Mr Simmonds removed his arm from my shoulder with such a jerk that I knew for certain he had not placed it there in innocence. となっています。 (お手数をおかけしてしまってすみません) he(Mr Simmonds)=検眼士です。 宜しくお願いします。

  • The Dark Glassesからの英文です。

    I saw Dr Gray leaving the Simmonds at six o'clock one evening. She must have been calling on poor Miss Simmonds. She noticed me at once as I emerged from the lane. "Don't loiter about, Joan. It's getting chilly." The next evening I saw a light in the office window. I stood under the tree and looked. Dr Gray sat upon the desk with her back to me, quite close. Mr Simmonds sat in his chair talking to her, tilting back his chair. A bottle of sherry stood on the table. They each had a glass half-filled with sherry. Dr Gray swung her legs, she was in the wrong, sexy, like our morning help who sat on the kitchen table swinging her legs. But then she spoke. "It will take time," she said. "A very difficult patient, of course." Basil nodded. Dr Gray swung her legs, and looked professional. She was in the right, she looked like our games mistress who sometimes sat on a desk swinging her legs. Before I returned to school I saw Basil one morning at his shop door, "Reading glasses all right now?" he said. "Oh yes, thank you." "There's nothing wrong with your sight. Don't let your imagination run away with you." I walked on, certain that he had known my guilty suspicions all along. Muriel SparkのThe Dark Glassesからの英文です。 主人公(Joan)は15歳ぐらいの女の子です。 Miss SimmondsはMr Simmonds (検眼士)の姉です。 Miss Simmondsが誤ってatropineという薬を点眼してしまい、失明の危機に陥っているところです。 -------------------------------------------------------------- ●Dr Gray swung her legs, she was in the wrong, in the wrongを辞書で引くと「間違って」とありました。 グレイ医師は足を揺らし、間違っていた。というのはどういう意味でしょうか? 教えてください。お願いします。 前文は "Dr Gray says if you switch from eserine to atropine--" It was put down to an accident. There was a strong hope that Miss Simmonds's one eye would survive. It was she who had made up the prescription. She refused to discuss it. I said, "The bottle may have been tampered with, have you thought of that?" "Joan's been reading books." The last week of my holidays old Mrs Simmonds died above the shop and left all her fortune to her daughter. At the same time I got tonsillitis and could not return to school. I was attended by our woman doctor, the widow of the town's former doctor who had quite recently died. This was the first time I had seen Dr Gray, although I had known the other Dr Gray, her husband, whom I missed. The new Dr Gray was a sharp-faced athletic woman. She was said to be young. She came to visit me every day for a week. After consideration I decided she was normal and in the right, though dull. となっています。