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Although the French and British had intended to launch a spring offensive in 1917, the strategy was threatened in February, when the Russians admitted that they could not meet the commitment to a joint offensive, which reduced the two-front offensive to a French assault along the Aisne River. In March, the German army in the west (Westheer), withdrew to the Hindenburg line in Operation Alberich, which negated the tactical assumptions underlying the plans for the French offensive. Until French troops advanced to compensate during the Battles of Arras, they encountered no German troops in the assault sector and it became uncertain whether the offensive would go forward. The French government desperately needed a victory to avoid civil unrest but the British were wary of proceeding, in view of the rapidly changing tactical situation. In a meeting with Lloyd George, French commander-in-chief General Nivelle persuaded the British Prime Minister, that if the British launched a diversionary assault to draw German troops away from the Aisne sector, the French offensive could succeed.

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>Although the French and British had intended to launch a spring offensive in 1917, the strategy was threatened in February, when the Russians admitted that they could not meet the commitment to a joint offensive, which reduced the two-front offensive to a French assault along the Aisne River. ⇒フランス軍と英国軍は1917年に春の攻撃を開始するつもりだったが、その戦略は2月時点で実施が危ぶまれるものとなった。ロシア軍が共同攻撃への参画を果たすことができないと認めたので、複数前線での攻撃(の計画)が、エーン川に沿った1か所の襲撃に縮小したのである。 >In March, the German army in the west (Westheer), withdrew to the Hindenburg line in Operation Alberich, which negated the tactical assumptions underlying the plans for the French offensive. Until French troops advanced to compensate during the Battles of Arras, they encountered no German troops in the assault sector and it became uncertain whether the offensive would go forward. ⇒3月に、西部戦線(ドイツ語:Westheer)のドイツ方面軍は、「アルベリヒ作戦」においてヒンデンブルク戦線まで撤退したので、フランス軍の攻撃計画の基礎を成す戦術上の仮定がくつがえされた。フランス軍隊が、(そういう当て外れを)補償するために、「アラスの戦い」の間に進軍するまでは、攻撃(予定)地区でドイツ軍隊に出会うことがなかったので、攻撃が進むかどうかについて不確実になったのである。 >The French government desperately needed a victory to avoid civil unrest but the British were wary of proceeding, in view of the rapidly changing tactical situation. In a meeting with Lloyd George, French commander-in-chief General Nivelle persuaded the British Prime Minister, that if the British launched a diversionary assault to draw German troops away from the Aisne sector, the French offensive could succeed. ⇒フランス政府は、市民の不安を避けるために何としても勝利を必要としていたが、目まぐるしく変わる戦術的状況に照らしてみれば、英国軍は進むことに慎重であった。(それで)フランス軍の司令官ニベーユ将軍は、ロイド・ジョージとの会談で、英国軍が陽動作戦攻撃を開始してドイツ軍隊をエーン地区から引き離してくれるなら、フランス軍の攻撃がうまくいくだろう(ので実行してほしい)、と英国の首相を説得した。

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