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The Battle of Messines (7–14 June 1917) was an offensive conducted by the British Second Army, under the command of General Sir Herbert Plumer, on the Western Front near the village of Messines in West Flanders, Belgium, during the First World War. The Nivelle Offensive in April and May had failed to achieve its more ambitious aims, led to the demoralisation of French troops and the dislocation of the Anglo-French strategy for 1917. The offensive at Messines forced the Germans to move reserves to Flanders from the Arras and Aisne fronts, which relieved pressure on the French. The tactical objective of the attack at Messines was to capture the German defences on the ridge, which ran from Ploegsteert (Plugstreet) Wood in the south, through Messines and Wytschaete to Mt. Sorrel, to deprive the German 4th Army of the high ground south of Ypres. The ridge commanded the British defences and back areas further north, from which the British intended to conduct the "Northern Operation", to advance to Passchendaele Ridge, then capture the Belgian coast up to the Dutch frontier. The Second Army had five corps, of which three conducted the attack and two remained on the northern flank, not engaged in the main operation; the XIV Corps was available in General Headquarters reserve (GHQ reserve). The 4th Army divisions of Gruppe Wijtschate (Group Wytschaete) held the ridge, which were later reinforced by a division from Gruppe Ypern. The battle began with the detonation of a series of mines beneath German lines, which created 19 large craters and devastated the German front line defences. This was followed by a creeping barrage 700 yards (640 m) deep, covering the British troops as they secured the ridge, with support from tanks, cavalry patrols and aircraft.

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>The Battle of Messines (7–14 June 1917) was an offensive conducted by the British Second Army, under the command of General Sir Herbert Plumer, on the Western Front near the village of Messines in West Flanders, Belgium, during the First World War. The Nivelle Offensive in April and May had failed to achieve its more ambitious aims, led to the demoralisation of French troops and the dislocation of the Anglo-French strategy for 1917. The offensive at Messines forced the Germans to move reserves to Flanders from the Arras and Aisne fronts, which relieved pressure on the French. ⇒「メッシネスの戦い」(1917年6月7-14日)は、第一次世界大戦間の西フランドル(ベルギー)のメッシネス村近くの西部戦線で、将軍ハーバート・プルーマー卿の指揮下に英国第2方面軍によって実行された攻撃であった。4月、5月の「ニヴェーユ攻撃」はその野心的な狙いを達成することに失敗して、フランス軍隊の士気沮喪と1917年の英仏戦略の崩壊に至った。メッシネスの攻撃は、ドイツ軍にアラス前線やエーン前線から予備軍をフランドル方面へ動かすことを余儀なくさせ、フランス軍への圧力を軽減した。 >The tactical objective of the attack at Messines was to capture the German defences on the ridge, which ran from Ploegsteert (Plugstreet) Wood in the south, through Messines and Wytschaete to Mt. Sorrel, to deprive the German 4th Army of the high ground south of Ypres. The ridge commanded the British defences and back areas further north, from which the British intended to conduct the "Northern Operation", to advance to Passchendaele Ridge, then capture the Belgian coast up to the Dutch frontier. ⇒メッシネス攻撃の戦術目的は、尾根でドイツ軍守備隊を攻略することであり、南のプロエグステールト(プルグストレート)の森からメッシネスやウィッツシャエトを通ってソレル山まで走り、ドイツ軍第4方面軍からイープル南の高地を奪うことであった。その尾根は、英国軍守備隊とさらに北の後方地域を見下ろしているので、英国軍はそこから「北の作戦行動」を実行し、パッシェンダエレ・リッジへ進軍してベルギーの海岸をオランダ国境まで攻略することを意図していた。 >The Second Army had five corps, of which three conducted the attack and two remained on the northern flank, not engaged in the main operation; the XIV Corps was available in General Headquarters reserve (GHQ reserve). The 4th Army divisions of Gruppe Wijtschate (Group Wytschaete) held the ridge, which were later reinforced by a division from Gruppe Ypern. ⇒第2方面軍は5個軍団を擁していたが、そのうち3個は攻撃を実行して、2個は主要な作戦行動では交戦することなく北の側面に残っていた。第XIV軍団は、総司令部予備軍(GHQ予備軍)として利用に供された。グルッペ・ウィッツチャテ(グループ・ウィツチャエテ)の第4方面軍師団は尾根を占拠していて、それは後にグルッペ・イペルンから師団による補強を受けた。 >The battle began with the detonation of a series of mines beneath German lines, which created 19 large craters and devastated the German front line defences. This was followed by a creeping barrage 700 yards (640 m) deep, covering the British troops as they secured the ridge, with support from tanks, cavalry patrols and aircraft. ⇒戦いは、ドイツ軍戦線の下で一連の爆薬の起爆をもって始まった。そして、それは19個の大きなクレーター(弾痕)をつくって、ドイツ軍最前線の防衛力を損なった。この後に、奥行き700ヤード(640m)の纏わりつく集中砲火が続き、戦車隊、騎兵パトロール隊、航空隊からの支援をもって、英国軍による尾根の確保が掩護された。

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