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The British and French benefitted from superior numbers, which enabled the Allied commanders to relieve divisions after shorter periods in the line. Severe criticism of General Sir Douglas Haig and General Henry Rawlinson during and since the war, for persisting with attacks on October, was challenged in 2009 by Philpott, who put the British share of the battle into the context of strategic subordination to French wishes, Joffre's general Allied offensive and the continuation of French attacks south of Le Transloy, which had to be supported by British operations and by more recent writing of the ordeal inflicted on the German armies.

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>The British and French benefitted from superior numbers, which enabled the Allied commanders to relieve divisions after shorter periods in the line. Severe criticism of General Sir Douglas Haig and General Henry Rawlinson during and since the war, for persisting with attacks on October, was challenged in 2009 by Philpott, who put the British share of the battle into the context of strategic subordination to French wishes, Joffre's general Allied offensive and the continuation of French attacks south of Le Transloy, which had to be supported by British operations and by more recent writing of the ordeal inflicted on the German armies. ⇒英国軍とフランス軍は数的優勢の利を得ていたので、それで連合国軍指揮官は比較的短い期間で戦線につく師団を軽減することができた。将軍ダグラス・ヘイグ卿とヘンリー・ローリンソン将軍が、戦争の間もそれ以来も10月の攻撃に固執したことに対して、フィルポットは2009年に疑問を呈した。彼らは戦いにおける英国の分担をフランスの願望に合わせた戦略的な従属という文脈に落とし込んだ、というものである。ジョフル将軍の(指揮する)連合国軍の攻撃やル・トランスロイ南でのフランス軍の攻撃も、英国軍の作戦行動によって支援しなければならなかった。そして、ドイツ軍に課された厳しい試練(戦争裁判)について最近書かれた文書によっても(そう言われている)。

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