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The first formal Allied conference met in Paris on 26 March 1916 (Italy did not participate) but initially made little impact, perhaps because Briand had vetoed the British suggestion of a permanent secretariat, or perhaps because there had been three informal sets of Anglo-French talks in the last quarter of 1915, one of which, the Chantilly meeting, had already seen strategy plans drawn up. Late in March 1916 Joffre and Briand blocked the withdrawal of five British divisions from Salonika. Briand was widely suspected of wanting to make his mistress Princess George Queen of Greece. In the spring of 1916 Briand urged Sarrail to take the offensive in the Balkans to take some of the heat off Verdun, although the British, preoccupied with the upcoming Somme offensive, declined to send further troops and Sarrail’s offensive that summer was not a success. Briand also attended the conference at Saleux on 31 May 1916 about the upcoming Anglo-French offensive on the Somme, with President Poincaré (on whose train it was held), General Foch (commander, Army Group North) and the British Commander-in-Chief General Haig.

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>The first formal Allied conference met in Paris on 26 March 1916 (Italy did not participate) but initially made little impact, perhaps because Briand had vetoed the British suggestion of a permanent secretariat, or perhaps because there had been three informal sets of Anglo-French talks in the last quarter of 1915, one of which, the Chantilly meeting, had already seen strategy plans drawn up. ⇒1916年3月26日に、最初の正式な連合国会議がパリで行われた(イタリアは参加しなかった)が、当初はあまりインパクトはなかった。それは、おそらくブリアンが永久事務局としての英国の提案を拒否したからであろう。あるいは、おそらく1915年の第4四半期の英仏会談で非公式ながら3項目の了解事項があったからであろう。その1つ、シャンティイ会議では、すでに戦略計画が作成されていたのである。 >Late in March 1916 Joffre and Briand blocked the withdrawal of five British divisions from Salonika. Briand was widely suspected of wanting to make his mistress Princess George Queen of Greece. In the spring of 1916 Briand urged Sarrail to take the offensive in the Balkans to take some of the heat off Verdun, although the British, preoccupied with the upcoming Somme offensive, declined to send further troops and Sarrail’s offensive that summer was not a success. ⇒1916年3月下旬、ジョフルとブリアンは、英国軍の5個師団がサロニカから撤退しようとしたのを阻止した。ブリアンは、彼の愛するジョージ王女をギリシャの女王にしたがっている、と広く疑われていた。1916年の春に、ブリアンはヴェルダンの熱気を一部なりと取り込むべく、バルカン諸国で攻勢に出るようサライユに訴えたが、英国軍が近づくソンム攻撃に心を奪われていて更なる軍隊の派遣を辞退したので、その夏はサライユの攻撃は成功しなかった。 >Briand also attended the conference at Saleux on 31 May 1916 about the upcoming Anglo-French offensive on the Somme, with President Poincaré (on whose train it was held), General Foch (commander, Army Group North) and the British Commander-in-Chief General Haig. ⇒ブリアンはまた、1916年5月31日に、近づく英仏軍によるソンム攻撃について、(そのための訓練を掌握する)ポアンカレ大統領、(北部方面軍グループ指揮官)フォッシュ将軍、および英国軍の総司令官ヘイグ将軍らと、サルーで会談を行った。

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