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The British were to attack the salient that had formed between Bapaume and Vimy Ridge with two armies and the French with three armies from the Somme to Noyon. The attacks were to be made on the broadest possible fronts and advance deep enough to threaten German artillery positions. When Marshal Joseph Joffre was superseded by General Robert Nivelle, the "Chantilly strategy" was altered. A policy of breakthrough and decisive battle to be achieved within 24–48 hours and lead to the "total destruction of active enemy forces by manoeuvre and battle" was returned to. Successive attacks in a methodical battle were dropped and continuous thrusts were substituted, to deprive the Germans of time to reinforce and strengthen their defences. A large amount of heavy artillery fire up to 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) deep, to the rear edge of the German defences would achieve the breakthrough. The infantry advance was to reach the German heavy artillery in one attack and then widen the breach with lateral attacks.

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>The British were to attack the salient that had formed between Bapaume and Vimy Ridge with two armies and the French with three armies from the Somme to Noyon. The attacks were to be made on the broadest possible fronts and advance deep enough to threaten German artillery positions. When Marshal Joseph Joffre was superseded by General Robert Nivelle, the "Chantilly strategy" was altered. A policy of breakthrough and decisive battle to be achieved within 24–48 hours and lead to the "total destruction of active enemy forces by manoeuvre and battle" was returned to. ⇒英国軍は2個方面軍をもってバポームとヴィミイ・リッジの間にできた突出部を攻撃し、フランス軍は3個方面軍をもってソンムからノヨンまでを攻撃することになっていた。前線をなるべく幅広く攻撃するものとし、またドイツ軍の砲兵隊陣地を脅かすべく十分(敵陣)深くまで進軍するものとなっていた。ジョセフ・ジョフル元師がロベール・ニベーユ将軍によって取って代わられたとき、「シャンティイ戦略」が変更された。24–48時間のうちに成し遂げられるべき飛躍的・決定的な戦いと、「機動作戦や戦闘によって敵軍団の活動を完全に破壊すること」まで至るようにする方針が戻ってきたのである。 >Successive attacks in a methodical battle were dropped and continuous thrusts were substituted, to deprive the Germans of time to reinforce and strengthen their defences. A large amount of heavy artillery fire up to 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) deep, to the rear edge of the German defences would achieve the breakthrough. The infantry advance was to reach the German heavy artillery in one attack and then widen the breach with lateral attacks. ⇒秩序立った戦いにおける連続した襲撃は取り下げられ、連続した突撃はドイツ軍が防衛軍を補強し強化する時間を奪うことに代えられた。ドイツ軍防衛隊の後方部隊の端に届く最高8キロ(5マイル)の射程の大量の重砲火なら貫通を達成できるだろう。歩兵連隊の進軍は1回の攻撃でドイツ軍の大型重砲兵隊を掴み、それから側面の突破口を広げることになっていた。

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